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View Full Version : STIHL Commercial Lithium-Ion Series (Electric Rechargeable Trimmers/Blower) 36v


TimTim2008
04-17-2012, 02:05 PM
http://www.stihlusa.com/graphics/li-ion-products.jpg

he Future of Professional Green Technology Is Here

STIHL Harnesses the Power of Lithium-Ion Battery Technology


STIHL Lithium-Ion technology – No Gasoline, No Emissions, No Power Cords.

STIHL harnesses this technology to produce an exciting new line of cordless, battery-powered outdoor power equipment. The result is a new breed of environmentally responsible products, eliminating both fuel costs and exhaust emissions. You can “save green” while “going green” with STIHL Lithium-Ion technology.

The 36-volt AP 160 Lithium-Ion battery is designed for long running times with quick recharges and operates at full speed until depleted, so there is no gradual drop in power during use. Batteries can be charged hundreds of times without any noticeable loss in capacity, and special battery electronics constantly monitor the battery to ensure optimal operation and a long service life.

STIHL Lithium-Ion battery powered products:
Environmentally responsible option for high-performance machines
Eliminate fuel costs for less expensive long-term operation
No cord, no exhaust emissions, no gasoline smell
Instant startup – just pull the trigger
No need for oil and fuel mixing
Less vibrations and quieter equipment performance
No gradual drop in power –runs at full speed until battery is depleted
Two batteries available – with 80 or 160 watt hours of power
Long service life – more than 80% of battery capacity remains after 500 charges
Battery design monitors temperature and shuts down if too warm or too cold
Intelligent battery circuit board exchanges data between tool and charger
AP 160 battery can be used interchangeably with the AP 80 battery



------------------

Anyone own any of these products?

If i could save just 1 gallon of gas per day ($4 @ just 100 days) that would pay for each tool.

vs 1kWh to charge the battery (7cents in power).

Now i doubt the blower is strong enough, but if the trimmers alone work, the gas savings, and no more visits to the small engine tech, this could really save me $..






http://www.stihlusa.com/li-ion.html

Richard Martin
04-17-2012, 03:49 PM
It's not that simple.

The run time of the FSA 85 with the big battery is 45 minutes. Then it takes, well, it doesn't say how long it takes to charge the big battery with the rapid charger. Hmmm... In fact, they don't state what the charge time of the big battery is with either charger.

It's really hard to do this comparison when Stihl doesn't provide the information necessary to do a true cost analysis.

Okay, we won't even bother to include the amount of time wasted while waiting for a battery to charge. You can just buy more batteries, but wait, that increases the cost of ownership. Hmm...

I'll try this another way.

We know the big battery will last 45 minutes until it suddenly, and without warning, dies. It would be nice to have a meter on it so I could have avoid the trip back to the truck to replace the battery. Darn, 10 more minutes wasted.

Okay, 45 minutes (maximum, it may be less depending on what I'm trimming, easy grass or deep grass) per battery. I use my trimmer for 2 hours each day so I'm going to need 3 batteries to complete a day of work. Just how much do those batteries cost?

They have an advertised life of at least 500 charges. It may go more, it may go less. Who knows? But we can multiply 500 times 45 minutes and divide that by 60 minutes (in an hour) and expect to have to replace the batteries every 375 hours. And regular gas trimmers are good for 1,000. I'll have to buy 3 sets of batteries for every trimmer just to equal a gas trimmer.

Okay, I get home with my 3 spent batteries. I can either sit around baby sitting my batteries while they charge with my one charger or I can charge all 3 of them at once with 3 charges. Decisions, decisions. Oh, I know... I'll charge them at the customers houses while I work. Opps. I forgot and left one behind one day. Someone then walked off with it.

You see... It is not cheaper. I have gone over this stuff a million times. Gas is still cheaper.

TimTim2008
04-17-2012, 04:26 PM
was just qutoed from my dealer, $299 for each trimmer, & chain saw.

and battery is $259, for the first one.. and 2nd one half off (plus rebate).
and $49 for charger.

batt only last about 45mins of use, each charge.
recharge in 30-70mins
if anyone can beat that price, pm me. (hint, hint)

i guess its a Huge upfront cost investment.
im also pissed about how much gas, my guys, (and even myself) SPILL every year just on the back of the truck alone.
so, i was trying to find another way out.

http://img.ehowcdn.com/article-new/ehow/images/a04/8e/i1/clean-up-small-gasoline-spill-800x800.jpg

Richard Martin
04-17-2012, 04:53 PM
and battery is $259, for the first one.. and 2nd one half off (plus rebate).
and $49 for charger.

batt only last about 45mins of use, each charge.
recharge in 30-70mins
if anyone can beat that price, pm me. (hint, hint)

i guess its a Huge upfront cost investment.
im also pissed about how much gas, my guys, (and even myself) SPILL every year just on the back of the truck alone.
so, i was trying to find another way out.

So you're going to have a man running a trimmer for 8 hours plus a day? You're going to need 11 batteries. :laugh:

It sounds like you need to have some serious retraining in refueling techniques. Approach this from a professional standpoint and they will get it right the first time and remember it. Go through the whole process including the mixing of the oil and gas. And you need to practice your training seminar before you give it to them. You may even want to contact the fire department and see if they would be willing to put on a gasoline fire demonstration at their place of choosing for you. Put together a comprehensive training program and it will pay off.

cleanairNC
04-17-2012, 05:10 PM
I have the blower and the heavy-duty trimmer. I have a total of 3 batteries. Each battery does have a lighted meter on it indicating battery life remaining. The rapid charger does the big AP 160 battery in 30m or less. I can tell you that for typical residential mows, the blower and one battery will get you through the better part of a day. Its actually pretty good, but probably not as useful for big commercial jobs. If you are planning on doing multiple hours of trimming each day, Richard is correct, this may not be the machine for you. I know not everyone can do this, but installing an inverter on your truck will allow you to take a charger with you and charge batteries while in the field. We actually have ours running off energy pulled from a solar panel set-up in the back of the rig. This allows us to charge on the go, and more importantly, not buy any gas. $100 rebates help ease the cost, making it a little more affordable. Again, electric is not for everyone (which is actually good for me, as it definitely sets me apart from the crowd in this industry).

Richard Martin
04-17-2012, 05:13 PM
I have the blower and the heavy-duty trimmer. I have a total of 3 batteries. Each battery does have a lighted meter on it indicating battery life remaining.

Your whole message is a good reply. You offered information and counter points without attacking. I like that. :)

rlitman
04-17-2012, 05:29 PM
According to this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline_gallon_equivalent
A gallon of gasoline contains around 33.41 kWh of energy.

Yes, the electric motor is probably 5 times as efficient as an internal combustion, BUT if you were to add an inverter to the mix, and charge off your vehicle, then you're probably burning MORE gas in your vehicle than you would be in a trimmer (because of the inefficiency of your vehicle's engine, PLUS the inefficiency of the inverter).

Even charging at home, isn't 7 cents though.
Assuming the electric is 5x more efficient, it would cost 47 cents in electric if you charged the batteries at your ridiculously low electric rates , to get the same use as a gallon of gas, or $1.41 at my ridiculously high electric rates. There are savings there, but not as much as you were thinking.

cleanairNC's reply shows a great use case for these. I can think of several others, but they're not for everyone. It's a niche item, and either it's great for you, or a lousy choice.

At least with Stihl, the reviews I've read say that the power is there (the hedge trimmers are supposed to be badass, and easily as good as a gas model, but lighter), so it's not like you're using home-store electric junk. It has finally reached the level where it CAN be used professionally, but I'm not sure if the up-front costs make it worthwhile for everyone.

Maybe you can use their quiet operation as a selling point in better neighborhoods, or their "green'ness"?

mowerbrad
04-17-2012, 07:24 PM
I talked with my John Deere/Stihl dealer about the electric string trimmer and hedge trimmer and was extremely impressed with the string trimmer. I don't know how well they would work for large commercial jobs, but they would do very well on residential lawns.

I played with the string trimmer a little in the dealer's showroom and was pleasantly surprised with it. The thing is extremely well balanced and lighter than any other trimmer I had ever used. It was also VERY QUIET!

The 45 minutes of run time did scare me a little but after talking with my dealer I realized that 45 minutes would actually get me through several accounts. The thing with the run time is that the 45 minutes is continuous run time, the trimmer is only drawing power when your finger is on the trigger. So as you walk from one part of the lawn to another to trim, the machine is actually not running. So it isn't like a gasoline engine where you have to keep it running the whole time you are on a lawn.

For me, most of my accounts can be trimmed in roughly 5 minutes, with only a few taking 10-15 minutes. And the trimmer is not actually trimming as I am at that property. So I definately see how these products can be beneficial to companies.

Classic Cuts Lawn Service
04-17-2012, 08:40 PM
was just qutoed from my dealer, $299 for each trimmer, & chain saw.

and battery is $259, for the first one.. and 2nd one half off (plus rebate).
and $49 for charger.

batt only last about 45mins of use, each charge.
recharge in 30-70mins
if anyone can beat that price, pm me. (hint, hint)

i guess its a Huge upfront cost investment.
im also pissed about how much gas, my guys, (and even myself) SPILL every year just on the back of the truck alone.
so, i was trying to find another way out.

http://img.ehowcdn.com/article-new/ehow/images/a04/8e/i1/clean-up-small-gasoline-spill-800x800.jpg

Simple solution for spilling gas...get the no spill gas cans...I used to be the same way...spilling gas everywhere until i got a no spill..works like a charm

hackitdown
04-17-2012, 08:46 PM
For me, most of my accounts can be trimmed in roughly 5 minutes, with only a few taking 10-15 minutes. And the trimmer is not actually trimming as I am at that property. So I definately see how these products can be beneficial to companies.

That is the big question. How much "trimmer run time" does a guy need to trim a day's route. That 45 minutes may work if you take 5 minutes each to trim 8 lawns. If.

I forgot that an electric motor doesn't burn energy at "idle", so that is a big factor. With a 2nd battery for backup, it could work.

roberthathaway7
04-22-2012, 01:37 AM
I am about to graduate as Certified Occupational Therapist Assistant, and will be going straight through to be a full OT before too long. I also have a lawn/landscaping business that has gotten me through school and will probably/HOPEfully keep paying off those student loans on the side :cool2:
I have already started developing a little paresthesia, especially in my right hand, which is a bad sign for carpal tunnel. All of the vibrating equipment in our industry not to mention the precarious angles we have to work with are just bad news in the way of our chances to develop injuries from overuse/etc. My professors use me as an example/guinea pig all the time because I think I'm the only student we have who has been doing hard manual labor (lawn/landscaping, logging, commercial fishing, etc)

I haven't personally got to try out any of these battery operated Stihls, but I've defintely taken a good look at them (all my peripheral equipment is Stihl). I assume that the vibration is taken down to zilch compared to the gasoline engines, and this could save big $$ on possible surgeries or other therapy services that a guy might need to go through from all of the power equipment usage. Also, you get to feel your 1-3 fingerstips for the rest of your life, which is a plus, haha, not to mention all of the other pain associated with CTS.

Also- it looks like nobody has considered the cost of oil mix? I use stihl's ultra-mix, which makes my 2-stroke fuel cost around 7$ per gallon

and on a side-note, just picked up a "used once" Stihl ms 362 for 500 bucks, and I am a HAPPY man!! :weightlifter:

roberthathaway7
04-22-2012, 01:47 AM
As much craziness as I jump into, I am always a safetey nut when it comes to work, mostly because I like to see other people be safe. This is a really good source to be educated on what carpal tunnel is, and you'll start to get an idea of how to protect yourself from it. Scan through the different sections on the left hand side of the page, especially the definition and prevention sections. If you're an employer, you'll definitely want to take a look as this because we all know how much we treasure a good worker that we would never want to lose due to injury.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/DS00326/DSECTION=symptoms

A quick tip that they don't tell you on the site is to take an (1/2 reg dose) ibuprofen right before and right after work. Unless you're a big old boy, then you can prob take 2. This will help to keep the swelling down in the nerve tunnel that you never realize is there from the vibration, which will reduce friction of the nerves etc. Stay healthy!!

LindblomRJ
04-22-2012, 01:51 AM
I can see a place in the market for battery powered equipment. The first would be for an eco-minded mowing setup.

The next would be for tools that see use on smaller projects.

Third option would be wiring up an inverter to power the charger in truck. You can keep a battery on the charger and two others at the ready.

There is a potential for cost savings. It looks like a viable option for moving away from gas powered equipment.

IMO there are some areas where running gas powered would give an advantage.

Ridin' Green
04-22-2012, 01:52 AM
roberthathaway7-


switch over to Amsoil Saber, and you can cut your oil costs down by an enormous amount. It also increases the power of your machine noticably, and the smoke is almost non existant. There are several threads here on that subject, and I posted a whole lot of breakdown data in one of them, but I don't have a link for you to that thread right now.

roberthathaway7
04-22-2012, 02:06 AM
I'll definitely look into that, Ridin Green. At least for my hedge trimmers. They're awesome but the smoke it produces is just AWFUL. I could knock a maggot off a gut wagon the way I smell after running those things. Been like that since they were new, and they've always ran great.. they just stank!

sjessen
04-22-2012, 08:32 AM
One problem the electric trimmer solves is how to deal with ethanol in 2 strokes. No more carb issues.

Busybee Lawns
04-22-2012, 11:22 AM
By using battery commercial trimmers, Are we really going green? I think not There somewhere is a coal fired power plant which makes up 90% of are electric produced in this country.. I think it would be better to use natural gas or lp. it cheaper

Bottom line everything uses some type of energy there is no such thing as going green! just because you think I use batteries you think your helping the environment but 80 miles there a power plant burning more to charge your trimmer.

even if you use a pair of hedge scissors some where in china a plant that produces them is burning more fuel such as coal. don't' be fooled!

roberthathaway7
04-22-2012, 12:37 PM
Oh yeah, I definitely agree, there's no way to technically even know how green you're going unless you trace the carbon footprint back to the beginning of time. I always thought the electric car idea was hilarious when it came to "going green". BS!! Every coal company was DROOLING over the idea of electric cars!! Which I'm ok with, personally I think we should burn all the coal we can get our hands on as long as we're always seeking more efficient and environmentally friendly ways to do it and still seeking out more renewable energy resources. The cool thing about depending on this electricity though- is that we are depending on our own natural resources a little more Thumbs Up rather than foreign oil, creating jobs and so on. I realize there are other points of view out there so I don't mean to start some crazy arguments, I promise to not even reply is someone tries to argue. BUT- I was going to say: nothing wrong with letting people decide to think you're "going green" it's always positive for business! As far as me going green: safety, effectiveness and efficiency! that's my working motto! going green is just a by-product

Cheffy
04-22-2012, 12:50 PM
So what am I supposed to do with my 4 Stihl trimmers I have now. I think in 10 years when the last one dies. I will maybe switch to pulling my bubble powered mowers around behind a prius and mount an eco friendly trimmed rack on top of the bubble powered prius. That of course by then will work with battery powered or bubble powered stihl trimmers.

All_Toro_4ME
04-23-2012, 11:12 AM
Interesting thread. For those of you that are concerned with the charging issues, there are adaptors you can buy that plug into your cigarette lighter and they will convert to 120v and you should be able to charge the batteries from your vehicle while you're using the other battery on an account.

ALEX'S LANDSCAPING
04-23-2012, 11:26 AM
This proves just how powerful they are: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BD5DfiP7wb8

Richard Martin
04-23-2012, 11:48 AM
Interesting thread. For those of you that are concerned with the charging issues, there are adaptors you can buy that plug into your cigarette lighter and they will convert to 120v and you should be able to charge the batteries from your vehicle while you're using the other battery on an account.

Yeah, I'm not so sure you really want to do that. Presumably the AL 300 rapid charger pulls 300 watts. That's 25 amps at 12 volts. I don't think it's a good idea to try to pull that through a cigarette lighter outlet. You could get away with using the 100 watt slow charger since it's only pulling a little over 8 amps. But if you're using the big battery it will take longer to charge it than you could use another battery for

The cigarette lighter in my truck is fused at 15 amps so it would pop the first time I tried to run 25 amps through it. I have a power point that is fused at 25 amps so that may work. If it pops then don't try to use it.

Richard Martin
04-23-2012, 12:01 PM
If I were to do an inverter I would hard wire it through a fuse and relay with a switch so I could turn the inverter on and off. There is no point in doing a half assed job when you will be relying on this to earn a living. I would also upsize the inverter to 500 watts minimum.

For those of you who doubt I would do this. This is a pic of my main panel for the single stage wet nitrous I put in my Mustang. I don't play around with electricity. There are 2 10 gauge cables to feed the power with a single 8 gauge ground cable. There is also another fuse block under the hood.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb56/RMartin631/Mustang/DSC01071.jpg

BBC.lawn.services
04-23-2012, 12:10 PM
Get two batteries. Get a solar panel with a battery source and a converter. (northern tools has a few if your want to get a visual) Mount it on your truck or trailer. Mount a cool box for your battery. Charge away. For free! I'll do the math later today and get the hour mark that you'll get a pay back on this system.

Richard Martin
04-23-2012, 12:37 PM
Get two batteries. Get a solar panel with a battery source and a converter. (northern tools has a few if your want to get a visual) Mount it on your truck or trailer. Mount a cool box for your battery. Charge away. For free! I'll do the math later today and get the hour mark that you'll get a pay back on this system.

Don't forget to price in a deep cycle battery.

petscanning
04-23-2012, 01:45 PM
I actually offer a green service. I have a older worx lawner mower and then I have 450watt solar panels total and 2 batteries. I charge my mower and my batteries for my trimmer and blower and I also have a the chainsaw all ryobi. Works well and never have a problem with them. The stihl trimmer would be much better than the ryobi I have but if a yard is maintained then the trimmer has no problem.

frotis
04-23-2012, 02:06 PM
Market seems too small. This is more for homeowners, but most homeowners aren't going to pay $250 for a battery trimmer, when they see trimmers for sale at big-box stores for half that price, that will serve them fine for the 20 minutes of use they will get each week.

petscanning
04-23-2012, 02:21 PM
green stuff is for those who dont want to mess with oil, gas, chaning oil and such.

grass_cuttin_fool
04-23-2012, 03:46 PM
Im seriously considering the blower to start with...I do alot of residential that only takes a few minutes to blow off the walk...might be a tax advantage out there that would help with the cost...plus so far we dont have the code red days that we cant use gas equipment but it wouldnt surprise me in the future....

BBC.lawn.services
04-23-2012, 04:03 PM
So...
$300 for trimmer
$250 for battery
$50 for charger.

Total - $600

Total for comparable gas trimmer (fs-90r)

$300

Gas - $4.00 per gallon

Oil - About $1.5 per gallon

Well tab gas consumption at .5 gallon per hour.

We're looking at around $2.50 per hour in fuel.

120 hours tell you start "making" a pay back on your investment.

(this is incorrectly assuming electricity is free)

So If you add in a extra battery and electricity cost. I would say 250 hrs. is a safe estimate of when you would start saving money.

For fun lets say you buy a $1,000 solar power kit and mount it to your truck to charge your batteries.

It would than take 720 hrs. to recoup the cost. (keep in mind this example is with only one string trimmer with two batteries.)

petscanning
04-23-2012, 04:21 PM
Im seriously considering the blower to start with...I do alot of residential that only takes a few minutes to blow off the walk...might be a tax advantage out there that would help with the cost...plus so far we dont have the code red days that we cant use gas equipment but it wouldnt surprise me in the future....

I carry my blower with my just incase I dont want to use the back pack for small stuff

grass_cuttin_fool
04-23-2012, 04:58 PM
I carry my blower with my just incase I dont want to use the back pack for small stuff
I use a bg55 90% of the time...before I can get a back pack out of the rack, crank and put it on...I grab the 55 out of the basket and crank it while walking to the side walk...

Richard Martin
04-23-2012, 05:04 PM
It would than take 720 hrs. to recoup the cost. (keep in mind this example is with only one string trimmer with two batteries.)

There are a few unknowns here. The first being, you are assuming the trimmer will even last to 720 hours. The second is the batteries won't last that long. The batteries are already down by 20% at only 375 hours (500 charges and each charge is good for 45 minutes on a brand new battery). The more number of times you charge the batteries the less time you will get to use that battery. By the time you get to the 500th charge the battery is only good for 36 minutes. You would probably need to replace the batteries at just about the time they start to turn a profit.

BBC.lawn.services
04-23-2012, 05:14 PM
really good points Richard. Unless gas get a gets really up there in $ I don't see these being able to make much of a dent in the bottom line

bucknut4u
07-08-2012, 06:33 PM
I'm looking at buying a battery operated Stihl weed trimmer but it looks like the trimmers don't hold a lot of line. I don't want to be adding line everytime I turn around. Any thoughts?

sjessen
07-08-2012, 06:36 PM
I'm looking at buying a battery operated Stihl weed trimmer but it looks like the trimmers don't hold a lot of line. I don't want to be adding line everytime I turn around. Any thoughts?

Swap out the head for a different/aftermarket one.

wall
07-08-2012, 08:52 PM
I been using the FSA 85 trimmer and it works great the batteries are not the problem,,, It's the trimmer head it uses, low line capacity + can be cantakerous to reload. But I am just a home owner.

leon2245
07-09-2012, 04:06 AM
I been using the FSA 85 trimmer and it works great the batteries are not the problem,,, It's the trimmer head it uses, low line capacity + can be cantakerous to reload. But I am just a home owner.


Just curious wall, "made in" what country is your FSA 85 stamped?

Duekster
07-09-2012, 06:55 AM
I am going to put a wind turbine on my electric van to help charge these things up.

caseysmowing
07-09-2012, 09:10 AM
I went to my dealer to buy a hedge trimmer and he was basically trying to give away the battery powered one. I think he was up to 300 off for charger battery and trimmer. I told him the only way I would have one of those is for free or gas goes though the roof. If these batteries are anything like the ones in remote control cars and trucks they have to be cared for carefully. I also think time will take a bigger toll on the batteries than how many charges they have on them. Just not for me. (yet) Gas 15 a gallon I'll take a closer look.

MOturkey
07-09-2012, 10:31 AM
My take on this after reading this entire thread is, that at this time, battery powered handhelds are largely going to be a novelty, with regards to commercial use. There are those who will purchase them, simply because they like to be able to say they have the newest thing on the block, just like they have to upgrade their TV or cell phone every time something new hits the market, even if what they have works perfectly well.

Myself, I'm one of those "wait and see" type of individuals, and likely I won't be in this business long enough to see a time when battery powered is more economical and/or, legislated into use in this area. I can, however, almost guarantee that they will, at some point, in some areas, become mandatory. It is my understanding that there are cities now that ban gas-powered blowers, so adding trimmers, edgers, chainsaws to that list, is just a natural progression.

Now, if I were a homeowner, who ran my trimmer maybe 20 minutes or so a week, and never left the house with it, I might seriously consider one of these units. No gas can to store, no mix to buy, no having to mess with mixing, and no reason to purchase an extra battery. Just buy the trimmer with one battery and the slow, and I'm guessing, cheaper charger, and you are in business.

rlitman
07-09-2012, 10:32 AM
. . . Just not for me. (yet) Gas 15 a gallon I'll take a closer look.

If you buy the MotoMix, gas is way over $15 a gallon.
If you just use the HP Ultra oil, it's closer to $7 a gallon.

caseysmowing
07-09-2012, 11:01 AM
I use the ultra HP. Moto mix is for homeowners with very small yards. I mix up 2 to 2 1/2 gallons at a time depending on the season. I forget how much is the mix when you buy in the 6 packs? I didn't think it would come to 7 dollars a gallon when gas is 3 dollars.

herler
07-09-2012, 12:04 PM
The unit still requires energy to run, which it draws from a battery that must be recharged with electricity that is produced by burning fossil fuels!

Bit of a lecture...
The electric company can not simply produce just the electricity required so that when I plug in a 100w lamp it simply produces 100 watts more at the generating end, it doesn't work that way... The electricity that my lamp is about to use when I turn it on must already be present, otherwise the lamp won't light... And for that to happen the electric company must take an educated guess based on historical records as to how many megawatts of electricity are being used by the hour on any given day, and it then over-produces this demand by about 20 percent to make sure there is always enough power available.

For any electric device to work, there must be enough electricity present in the pool.
Unfortunately it's either there or it isn't, we can't store it for later use, we can produce it but if it doesn't get used, it is lost.
Hence, electricity in its production is only about 80% efficient.
And we are using this electricity to recharge the battery that ultimately must power the unit.
A unit which requires just as much power whether it burns fuel or electricity...

All we have managed to accomplish is put smoke and mirrors around a situation by diverting the path of energy and making it look like this is the solution to the problem, but the truth is we are still using just as much energy and burning just as much fossil fuel in the process, truthfully since we are now using three steps in delivering energy from the production end to the consuming one we are probably using more energy now than if we had simply used a gas trimmer to begin with.

Might be a bit quieter, and maybe a little more pollution friendly due to the fact that hand held tools don't have catalysators but then I'm not sure if electric companies do...

Duekster
07-09-2012, 12:07 PM
The unit still requires energy to run, which it draws from a battery that must be recharged with electricity that is produced by burning fossil fuels!Really? Did not know that.

However most power plants have been moved out of the city into attainment areas. The other is they hope you charge them at night when the power plants are otherwise idle.

I know, we are just shifting over sources. *trucewhiteflag*

leon2245
07-10-2012, 02:05 PM
I went to my dealer to buy a hedge trimmer and he was basically trying to give away the battery powered one.

Yeah mine aren't doing anything even remotely similar.




Just curious wall, "made in" what country is your FSA 85 stamped?

Austria, btw. Made in Austria.

Lordtimothy
07-10-2012, 05:16 PM
Just a note on the power inverter. I install a 110volt inverter in any car I take over the road. Normally a 450watt one and direct wire that to the battery with a fuse. That way I can have several laptops and other items plugged in to keep the passengers busy and not talking to me while I am driving.

They are not that expensive starting at around 30 dollars on up. The little 120/140 watt ones is the only ones you can use in cigarette plugs as that is 15 amps or there about.

hackitdown
07-10-2012, 07:28 PM
After reading this thread, I see many opinions. But does anyone have any ACTUAL experience using one of these things? It seems like a lot of guesswork going on here.

cleanairNC
07-11-2012, 05:51 PM
I have ACTUAL experience using these, every day. If you have any specific questions about them, feel free to PM me.

Richard Martin
07-11-2012, 06:05 PM
If you have any specific questions about them, feel free to PM me.
How about we just share the info out here in the forums. That way everybody can see. Seriously. There are a ton of questions and theories posted here. Maybe you can answer some of those that have already been posted?

Duekster
07-11-2012, 07:44 PM
How about we just share the info out here in the forums. That way everybody can see. Seriously. There are a ton of questions and theories posted here. Maybe you can answer some of those that have already been posted?

See the name, Clear Air. I agree post it.

leon2245
07-11-2012, 11:45 PM
Definitely a premium alternative for those considering or coming from the likes of B&D, Ryobi, & Toro electrics at the big box stores, butvwhat I find curious is the pro designation, commercial warranty etc. The 85 anyway. I don't know how they're going to stack up to even stihl's or anyone's power trimmers, even their least powerful homescaper models- any input in that regard cleanair?

I understand the city of dallas uses these things.


Austria, btw. Made in Austria.

Acgually Austria (trimmer), Germany (battery), & Slovakia (charger).

leon2245
07-12-2012, 08:37 AM
How about we just share the info out here in the forums. That way everybody can see. Seriously. There are a ton of questions and theories posted here. Maybe you can answer some of those that have already been posted?

+1 no need to take it to PM, although I could also appreciate anyone's reluctance to discuss theirs, around here.


Stihl is not Crazy there hoping there are just enough STUPID customers willing to buy the junk to keep the line alive, I do not see it happening.
easy-lift guy


"I'm an electric car.
I can't go very fast, or very far.
And if you drive me,
everyone will think you're gay.

ONE OF US!
ONE OF US!
ONE OF US!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkzBwXNACrM

:laugh:

cleanairNC
07-12-2012, 05:05 PM
Its a time issue really. Too busy burnin' batteries to read 6 pages of questions at the moment! Only hop on here for a few minutes now and then when I can.

For the most recent question, I can't honestly say, as I am not real familiar with gas trimmers and the difference in power from model to model. I started with electric and have stuck with it. I think I alluded to this in my first post about the Stihl equipment--for residential accounts they work great. Lightweight, fast, powerful. I'm not doing miles of edging, heavy brush, or pastures with it obviously. The power is there and I've not had a problem. Plus, the lack of maintenance is great. One less thing for me to worry about/spend time on.

David Grass
03-27-2013, 10:45 AM
I am getting the FSA 85, with 2 batteries and the quick charger today, along with the blower. I am a musician and have started developing a few pains in my arm from the vibrations of hand held equipment (primarily the weed eater). I am not jeopardizing playing guitar/bass, etc. I WILL PAY FOR THIS NEW LINE that stihl has developed and am glad it has finally come along. I also have worried about breathing fumes for 20 years, and it's effects. Walker Super B exhausts way behind me as I fly, so now no fumes. I will let everyone know how this works. I plan to use it very efficiently, and truly I can weed eat most of my accounts in 3 to 5 minutes with 3 minutes blow off.......

weeze
03-27-2013, 01:31 PM
i have a craftsman 19.2v battery powered hedge trimmer. i have 4 batteries since i also have craftsman drills, impact wrench, etc. each battery lasts about 30-45 min. i don't do alot of shrub trimming so it works great for me since it's so light.

i imagine one day everything we use will be electric or something like that. they have a long way to go though. there are already electric push mowers, ztrs, etc. out there. the deal breaker right now is the run time. once they get a battery to last 8hrs or more then it will really take off. right now most mowers only last 1-1/12hrs on batteries which is only good enough for a homeowner with a small yard.