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Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 02:11 PM
I've seen all different caster tire height and width. Some are slick, some have tread.

Seems like a slick tread would be easier on turf when rotating. The bigger the tire the better the ride?
The wider the tire, the less ground pressure?

What's the scoop here? :confused:

TLS
12-18-2002, 02:34 PM
:eek:

LAWNGODFATHER
12-18-2002, 03:35 PM
Treaded tire will through debris up on the machine also. The more tread the more debris.

For the rest you got it right on.

Doc Pete
12-18-2002, 06:05 PM
Originally posted by Envy Lawn Service
The wider the tire, the less ground pressure?
What's the scoop here? :confused:

Well to a point. The wider the tire the large the "footprint", and the larger effort to turn it. As far as a softer rider, you want a larger "sideway", to "cushion" the bumps. For some stupid reason "most" all of the rider makers are offering the 12x23/25 tire/rim combo. If they went to the 8/9 X 23 tire/rim combo you'd get a much better ride.
Pete

Flex-Deck
12-18-2002, 08:38 PM
Switchless - your numbers do not make sense -

If the tire is a 9x3.5x4 - 4 ply - It means it is 9" tread diameter or height of the tire from ground to top.

3.5 inches wide (sidewalls)

Fits a 4 inch rim. - 4 ply

Thanks, Brad

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 09:04 PM
He's talking about 24x12-12 v/s 24x12-8, saying the smaller rim gives a better ride.

Doc Pete
12-18-2002, 09:10 PM
Originally posted by Flex-Deck
Switchless - your numbers do not make sense -

If the tire is a 9x3.5x4 - 4 ply - It means it is 9" tread diameter or height of the tire from ground to top.

3.5 inches wide (sidewalls)

Fits a 4 inch rim. - 4 ply

Thanks, Brad

Sorry,
I thought you'd catch my drift. I was referring to the tires rear tires on a rider, of which I meant, the tire size was from 23" to 25" in diameter on a 12" rim. And, the second part was the suggestion to decrease the rim size to 8" or 9", and still run a 23"to 25" diameter tire. This would increase the sizewall (as I call it) 3"or 4" inches. Also, keep in mind that going from a 12" rim to an 8", besides being 4" small is 33% smaller, which is a big amount.
Pete

Doc Pete
12-18-2002, 09:15 PM
Originally posted by Envy Lawn Service
He's talking about 24x12-12 v/s 24x12-8, saying the smaller rim gives a better ride.
Yup, right on. FWIW, after experimenting with my WB's tires, the larger sidewall, also gives a better cut. The reason for this is the the bigger sidewalled tire acts like a "tank track" and rolls "over and around" the bumps, keeping the deck more level with the ground, as compared to the stiffer sidewall, which follows every high and low spot of the ground.
Pete

LAWNGODFATHER
12-18-2002, 09:42 PM
This goes both ways. Ferris offers tires like you described on their WB'a and they give a "floatiing" felling but as they float they cannot follow when the ground changes.

On another note the more sidewall you have the higher cost of a tire. More sidewall = more rubber = more ply's.

DC runs the turf boss tires like this, for some they love and others hate it.

I find the 24-12-12 size is optimum for what they are mounted to.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 09:46 PM
I'm glad I thought to ask this question because makes like Gravely for instance have tread on the castor tires. But Gravely uses a taller tire.

Anyways, the knowledge is good either way if I go with a rider, a walkbehind or both. Best of all, a good friend of mine is very handy with a welder. So I may be building a custom sulky sometime soon. If my ideas and his work come together right, we might just have a great invention!

Doc Pete
12-18-2002, 11:08 PM
Originally posted by Envy Lawn Service
I'm glad I thought to ask this question because makes like Gravely for instance have tread on the castor tires. But Gravely uses a taller tire.

As far as I know, the treaded tire is the same as the non tread tire (front castor type), except it has the additional rubber to make the tread. With that in mind, the treaded tire offers much greater protection against damage and/or getting a hole in it.
Pete

Doc Pete
12-18-2002, 11:24 PM
Originally posted by LAWNGODFATHER
This goes both ways. Ferris offers tires like you described on their WB'a and they give a "floatiing" felling but as they float they cannot follow when the ground changes.

On another note the more sidewall you have the higher cost of a tire. More sidewall = more rubber = more ply's.

DC runs the turf boss tires like this, for some they love and others hate it.

I find the 24-12-12 size is optimum for what they are mounted to.

I can't argue personal preferences, however, you bring out my exact point. I "don't" want the machine to follow the ground perfectly. This is why, besides other things, that a 48" WB or such gives a smoother look to the same lawn as compared to using a little 21" snapper machine, which follows every little detail of the lawn. Also, correct tire design and pressure need to be matched to the machine. As far as cost, I found the difference in price only $1.23 per tire. For the improved cut, less visits to the back Doctor, and less wear and tear on my machine, the $1.23 per tire is acceptable.
Pete

LAWNGODFATHER
12-18-2002, 11:39 PM
I've run mowers several different ways.

I like the stiffer ride better.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 11:43 PM
You know, I was thinking the other day while looking at stripes from Dixie Choppers. If you look close they are accented very well at the edges where the tire marks are. I think that is part of the reason their stripes stand out so well. The tires...

Take a look and you'll see what I mean. If I can find one of those I'll post it over here.

Envy Lawn Service
12-18-2002, 11:58 PM
Ok, this isn't the one I was looking at. But it's an OK example. This is one cut by Nick. What I'm talking about can be seen better over on Eric's stripping page.

LAWNGODFATHER
12-19-2002, 12:03 AM
Bluegrass will show stipes like that.


Here is Fescue. It's not really the tires but how you make your stripes.

Envy Lawn Service
12-19-2002, 12:08 AM
I was just pointing out that the tire tracks outline the stripes more causing big difference in the coloration between to and away stripe.

Doc Pete
12-19-2002, 12:32 AM
Originally posted by LAWNGODFATHER
I've run mowers several different ways.

I like the stiffer ride better.

Hmmmm, my wife says the same thing:dizzy:

LAWNGODFATHER
12-19-2002, 02:07 AM
Originally posted by Switchless@aol.com
Hmmmm, my wife says the same thing:dizzy:

Does Viagra help them tires?

Phishook
12-19-2002, 02:21 AM
Originally posted by Switchless@aol.com
As far as I know, the treaded tire is the same as the non tread tire (front castor type), except it has the additional rubber to make the tread. With that in mind, the treaded tire offers much greater protection against damage and/or getting a hole in it.
Pete

No, the smooth tires have tread, it's just a smooth tread. If the tire didn' have a tread, it wouldn't be able to last a day. The ribbed tires just have that pattern in the mold. Let your wife try those.:D

Tony Harrell
12-19-2002, 06:54 AM
I noticed Bob-Cat has changed their tires on WB's for '03. They are narrower and they look taller (drive tires).

Doc Pete
12-19-2002, 08:16 AM
Originally posted by LAWNGODFATHER
Does Viagra help them tires?

Err.......:D Yeah, it keeps them from gong flat:p
Pete

Doc Pete
12-19-2002, 08:22 AM
Originally posted by Phishook
No, the smooth tires have tread, it's just a smooth tread. If the tire didn' have a tread, it wouldn't be able to last a day. The ribbed tires just have that pattern in the mold. Let your wife try those.:D

Hey thanks. Most of the non-ribbed tires seemed much smaller in diameter than their ribbed counter part. So, I just assumed it was from a smaller thickness of rubber on the tire.
OH, and my wife "does" like the ribbed kind much better:blush:
Pete