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lawn connection
12-18-2002, 05:17 PM
we are a small but special lawn care company that produces aprox. 1.3 million in sales of lawn,tree and deck care. we have 7 full-time workers and 5 part-timers. is there a standard pay structure for guys that over see route responsiblities that include: sales,production,supervise etc.

rodfather
12-18-2002, 06:26 PM
Standard pay structure throughout the state of New Jersey or the industry at whole? I am afraid your question is somewhat vague.

I find it somewhat strange that an employee would be in charge of sales, production, and supervision (management). Basically, they are the 3 main elements of business (excluding finance).

I am curious as to how (if any) of your people manage to do all 3 of these within their jobs?

rodfather
12-18-2002, 06:30 PM
I guess now that I think about it, if they "oversee" these activities, you would consider them managers. A pay structure then I would think would be a salary (taking care of the production and supervision task) and a commission plan (based upon sales events and quotas).

Hope that made some sense...

Ric
12-20-2002, 07:07 AM
1.3 sales?? How have you been paying?? What is your gross and net Margins??

GroundKprs
12-20-2002, 08:18 AM
Green industry surveys in the past 10 years have shown a wide variation of wages, even in one geographic region. I remember one where the hourly charges to customers ranged from $6/hr to $135/hr.

I have met other contractors who purposely pay 2x the going labor rate for their areas, to get stability and productivity from their employees. One of these fellows even claimed he was getting 2½-3 times the production of like businesses in his area, and just paying 2x the going rate. Most of really open talk of numbers occurs at state and national trade conferences.

Best way to gauge the situation in your exact area is to talk to other workers and/or owners in your area. This may seem crazy, who's gonna share his details like that? And workers might inflate their own pay when talking about it. And you can't just approach someone and start asking numbers. Long term communication will be helpful to everyone in the trade, on a local, state, national, and global level.

That being said, for every local cohort that I can communicate with on almost everything, there are at least 5 others who just scowl at me. LOL.

From your other post, you seem to be running a class business, and treating your workers with class. Don't stoop to standards.