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buzzer51
05-01-2012, 10:18 PM
I want to help out a friend by grading his gravel driveway. The driveway is very steep and he has trouble getting a car/ truck up the driveway w/out it getting stuck. He had a local company spread crusher-run but the problem (to me) seems that he needs to have the ruts graded and smoothed. I have a B2710 Kubota and I'm looking at using a power rake to clean-up the ruts and smooth out the driveway. Is the best method? Any suggstions on other tools/ implements to use? Do I need to worry about putting a crown in the driveway? I've seen other posts that discuss the use of a power rake but all of them are grading a flat road/ driveway.

Thanks!

shovelracer
05-05-2012, 08:16 AM
ruts and pot holes will continue to be a problem unless you are able to properly compact it. A rake would be helpful to loosen it up, but the best approach would be to have a box blade, grader, or dozer. Assuming you do not have any of that. Loosen up and relevel/grade the area. Water management is essential as water running over the crusher will destroy it. You can also apply a binder to the surface to help. I have a 10% crusher road on my property and even with proper drainage angles I regrade it at least once a year to keep up on it.

DVS Hardscaper
05-05-2012, 10:47 AM
you need to have a crown and direct water accordingly.

I have a steep road. Gravel/dirt. But I use the skid steer to maintain it. Most of the water is routed to run off to the sides....not down the road.



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buzzer51
05-06-2012, 01:26 PM
ruts and pot holes will continue to be a problem unless you are able to properly compact it. A rake would be helpful to loosen it up, but the best approach would be to have a box blade, grader, or dozer. Assuming you do not have any of that. Loosen up and relevel/grade the area. Water management is essential as water running over the crusher will destroy it. You can also apply a binder to the surface to help. I have a 10% crusher road on my property and even with proper drainage angles I regrade it at least once a year to keep up on it.
Thanks Shovelracer - I've been talking to a few "professionals" and they have suggested a similar approach.

buzzer51
05-06-2012, 01:27 PM
you need to have a crown and direct water accordingly.

I have a steep road. Gravel/dirt. But I use the skid steer to maintain it. Most of the water is routed to run off to the sides....not down the road.



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Thanks for your response - good to know that I'm going in the right direction.

FLCthes4:11-12
05-06-2012, 10:15 PM
if you are going to beat up a harley rake on it (i hope its a rental lol) what about mixing some portland into the mix

DVS Hardscaper
05-06-2012, 11:17 PM
if you are going to beat up a harley rake on it (i hope its a rental lol) what about mixing some portland into the mix


ya know.....i'm not 100% sold on mixing cement into an aggregate driveway.

And a few years ago, I even advised my neighbor to do this :hammerhead:

See....cement, it needs wire and rebar to reinforce it. Just like the human body has a skeleton system. So, yeah, Portland may do the trick for a week or two, but after its been driven over 2-4 times per day - it will just pulverize.


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mxridernorth
05-07-2012, 06:47 PM
I've done a few steep drives and the best performing one used recycled asphalt. It binds well, resists washing out and is easy to replenish.

Water management is key and you need to move it off the driveway quickly before it creates ruts from the tires. There is a driveway near my house that was uses crushed screenings as the surfacing material. To control water, they installed strip drains, constructed from 3"x.25" bar stock, every 50 ft or so and let them drain to the side of the driveway. I have to say that the driveway holds up admirably well. And we get a lot of rain up here.

To get rid of potholes you need to scarify the surface with something, and then regrade and compact. Without first scarifying the area around the pothole it will return in short order.

shovelracer
05-07-2012, 08:57 PM
Asphalt screenings do perform slightly better, but are illegal to use in many areas. In NJ you have to put down with a paver box or binder in order to use. People put it down anyways but you'd be risking water contamination and a visit from the EPA.

DVS Hardscaper
05-07-2012, 11:17 PM
LOL - the EPA! I don't think there isn't much you can't do that doesn't risk a visit from the EPA.

I had some questions, wanted
To make sure i wasnt doing anything illegal, and called the EPA......was on the phone for over an hr being passed from
Person to person to person and still
Never got my question answered. What a joke. So needless to say the EPA can kiss my you-know-what.

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