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landscapetastic
05-11-2012, 06:15 PM
Hi,

Do any of your customers ever demand that you buy your plants from
a certain nursery? Well I did, I usually deal with one local nursery. Thats were
I get most of my plants from. The customers demands that I get the leyland cypress from a nursery 25 miles away from there house. But as I keep telling the customer my nursery I deal with is very good quailty in terms of plant material. But she does not believe me . But she does take no for a answer. She wants it from nursery she wants to go to. What do I do walk away or please her and pick up the plants 25 miles away and charge her extra.

Duekster
05-11-2012, 06:17 PM
Hi,

Do any of your customers ever demand that you buy your plants from
a certain nursery? Well I did, I usually deal with one local nursery. Thats were
I get most of my plants from. The customers demands that I get the leyland cypress from a nursery 25 miles away from there house. But as I keep telling the customer my nursery I deal with is very good quailty in terms of plant material. But she does not believe me . But she does take no for a answer. She wants it from nursery she wants to go to. What do I do walk away or please her and pick up the plants 25 miles away and charge her extra.

Charge for the plant and by the hour to go get it. :hammerhead:

HPSInc
05-11-2012, 06:57 PM
i would definately tell her its going to cost more. but if i wasnt hungry for the work id probably pass on it. thats a sign they will be a royal pain in the @ss. sometimes im up for the challenge. sometimes im not.

Think Green
05-11-2012, 09:34 PM
land,
I have several customers that choose one nursery over another.......it is a sign of loyalty and to others it is a sign of a pain. Make your own opinion after time with working for this customer. I will tell them that the drive time will cost them more than purchasing from a closer supplier but if the customer is insistent, then so be it. Tell them that the cost for one tree in delivery will be the same as 100 in terms of driving.
The end to this story is the customer knows that if something happens to this tree, they can probably get a replacement .......................I have a friend that has a reputation like this with his supplier.
I have a account with the 5 local suppliers we use and always have a tax exempt account for resales. I am not married to one supplier over another.............it is who has what I need at the time of the sale.

grandview (2006)
05-12-2012, 07:04 AM
Charge he drive time.Then sign up at the nursery to get the wholesale price on it.

93Chevy
05-12-2012, 08:30 AM
How is your history with the customer? How old are you? How long have you been in business?

If it's a newer customer, insisting on where you get your product is a sign of disrespect towards you. I would tell her "I get my nursery product from so and so because I have a good relationship with them. If you don't believe me that they have good product, then hire a jackwagon from craigslist."

If it's a more established customer just charge them for drive time.

FLCthes4:11-12
05-12-2012, 09:58 AM
The way I have handled that in the past is for the customer to go to the nursery on their own (or with me for consult charge 50bucks or so per hour), purchase the plants and pay the nursery for delivery. That way it is their plants and you charge for labor only and no warranty. Usually it is a little less money for me but alot less headache and the customer is happy because they truly beleive they got a deal and in some instances they do.

Coffeecraver
05-12-2012, 12:14 PM
I would get the leyland where she wants to get it.
If you are not normally using this nursery you should get her to pay for it retail so she has the warranty.(example) If she paid 80.00 for it you should divide by 3 which is 26.66 x 2 = 53.33 this is what you would charge for delivery and installation per plant.As it was stated earlier in this post you may lose a little money but you won't be carrying the warranty.
:)

Think Green
05-13-2012, 08:21 PM
Charge he drive time.Then sign up at the nursery to get the wholesale price on it.

How do you sign up for a wholesale price on products???
I have been doing business with the locals for over 20 years, and all I get is 20-25% off per plant or product, excluding mulches like cypress.
I guess you guys have more lucrative customer basis than I do. The nurseries here only do a reduced rate because of the costs associated with purchases.
If I could get a gallon plant........wholesale's for about 4.00 and the MSRP is 9.99 then I could do a little warranty work. Then again, it isn't happening either.

Duekster
05-13-2012, 08:48 PM
How do you sign up for a wholesale price on products???
I have been doing business with the locals for over 20 years, and all I get is 20-25% off per plant or product, excluding mulches like cypress.
I guess you guys have more lucrative customer basis than I do. The nurseries here only do a reduced rate because of the costs associated with purchases.
If I could get a gallon plant........wholesale's for about 4.00 and the MSRP is 9.99 then I could do a little warranty work. Then again, it isn't happening either.

It is getting harder, 1 G plants cost between 2.85 to 3.85 but you need to buy 300 of them. :dizzy:


Used to be able to get $300 delivered then 500, then 750 then 1,000 now 1K plus fuel surcharges.

FLCthes4:11-12
05-14-2012, 08:10 AM
you have to understand the nursery supply chain. you have gowers/wholsale plants will be the cheapest here because this is where they are started and 85% finished. Then you have re wholsale thats the model that jdl, stovall and others fall into they normally have a 25% to 33% mark up on material for contractors. Then you have retail garden center normal retail mark up is close to 100% then they might knock off 20% off retail and call it there wholesale price. With mulch to get the best price you have to find it when it comes out of the grinder once it is sold then resold there is not much of a margin left. It is the diesel the that is required to make it that drives the price.

Think Green
05-15-2012, 12:03 AM
I completely understand the wholesale game you guys are mentioning. I used to run and work a nursery for 3 big ticket stores.
Mobile, Alabama area is one location for suppies, Burt Hybell Nursery is the other. I am not a nursery dealer, I am a independent landscaper, maintenance provider whom does the work for residential clients that don't need the services of the big job guys. You know this old--Chestnut??

wildstarblazer
05-15-2012, 06:59 PM
If the customer doesn't balk about paying more to go extra distance, than that's not not a pita. As long as they pay what you want it's a good customer in my book.

andyslawncare
05-15-2012, 09:31 PM
I would turn my head and walk away. I buy from 4 wholesalers and generally only those 4. Its rare that my customers even ask me where I got a plant unless its a unique specimen that costs them $700+ to install.

wildstarblazer
05-15-2012, 10:57 PM
I would turn my head and walk away. I buy from 4 wholesalers and generally only those 4. Its rare that my customers even ask me where I got a plant unless its a unique specimen that costs them $700+ to install.

Shoot, you got all that equipment and 6 employees, you may be in a good position that your able to walk away from business.

some of us take what we can get sadly enough... :cry:

Duekster
05-16-2012, 01:10 AM
It depends on the bigger picture but the client will pay for the extra time.

I would like to say each and every job stands alone and I make money on all of them. I rarely lose money on a single job but I think all will cover Overhead and Direct cost. Jobs that cover overhead and direct cost does help in many ways.

This is particularly true if you have your cost covered by routine work.
However, These types of jobs are supposed to be money jobs, maintenance is supposed to cover cost and provide cash flow. Installs are profit jobs, do not give them away.

My exceptions are some small extras to good clients. I make my hourly rates and mark ups but do not consider as money jobs.