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rpearlberg
05-15-2012, 08:07 PM
We're looking to have a patio installed and I've had a couple of quotes. Some have said we need drainage pipes under the patio, others have said the sand and gravel will do enough...
What are your thoughts? Attached are pictures of today during the rain....

I just want to know if I should spend the money on drainage or if it's not necessary.

Thanks!!

Dr.NewEarth
05-15-2012, 08:18 PM
Put up the pictures again. They aren't displaying.

rpearlberg
05-15-2012, 08:27 PM
I forgot to add pictures!

AztlanLC
05-16-2012, 12:33 AM
I'd say whoever is recommending drainage under the patio has deal with this type of issues before and knows what will happen to the patio in the future, also make sure they attach the gutters as well now is the best time.
Enjoy you patio

2brothersyardcare
05-16-2012, 08:41 AM
Give us a call 203-494-7816 ill be in fairfield today and would happily come out and discuss your options.

Sincerely,

Bo Baker

rpearlberg
05-16-2012, 11:05 AM
Give us a call 203-494-7816 ill be in fairfield today and would happily come out and discuss your options.

Sincerely,

Bo Baker

I usually don't get home until after 5:30pm...what company are you with?

Glenn Lawn Care
05-16-2012, 11:20 AM
Sand and class 5 should be enough for drainage. Just make sure the patio itself has drainage and that start with the class 5 and a laser level. example: Where you want all the water to drain should be the lowest point around an inch. And at the other end of the patio should be at 3 inches and dropping a 1/4 to 1/8 of an inch every 10 feet down to that inch I mentioned earlier!

rpearlberg
05-16-2012, 11:21 AM
Sand and class 5 should be enough for drainage. Just make sure the patio itself has drainage and that start with the class 5 and a laser level. example: Where you want all the water to drain should be the lowest point around an inch. And at the other end of the patio should be at 3 inches and dropping a 1/4 to 1/8 of an inch every 10 feet down to that inch I mentioned earlier!

So there's no need for actual drains under the patio with the gutter downspouts tied it (to get the gutter water off of the patio).

CSLC
05-16-2012, 11:43 AM
It would not be a bad idea if you did. I have installed floor drains into patio's usually only when I can not run water off of patio to one area or are doing a pool job so no watershed goes into the pool. You can slope patio obv away from house have a drainage run go from end to end and tie two spouts into it from house and either day light it or dump it into a drywell.

DVS Hardscaper
05-16-2012, 01:53 PM
You do not fix standing water issues with "sand" and "gravel". Oh my heavens.

Water issues are remedied:
1) proper grading. Sloping the ground accordingly to ensure positive run-off.
2) drywells. And perforated flexible drain tubing
3) drain boxes such as Duraslope


I'm on a jobsite lookin at your pic on a 2x3.5" screen. I'll take a look again tonight on another computer and will advise intelligently.

Also need more info from you. the pics are of the sideyard. Are you putting the pato on the side? How bout pics of where the patio is to go? Along with pics of the lowest point of the yard? Is the front lower than the back?? Where does the water go now? Please elaborate. Also, we're all busy, it's hard to sit here and envision your overall plans and site. The More pics and details - the better feedback you'll receive :)


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Glenn Lawn Care
05-16-2012, 01:58 PM
So there's no need for actual drains under the patio with the gutter downspouts tied it (to get the gutter water off of the patio).

I just built a paver patio, and with the proper drainage you should have no problems. Where the water runs off the patio there is a french drain that I also installed. We have had heavy rain since I built it 3 weeks ago and it seems to be fine.

DVS Hardscaper
05-16-2012, 02:46 PM
You need to be careful with drywells by dwellings. Concentrated water in the drywell could find its way to the basement. If you do a drywell, you need to pipe the water far from the dwelling.
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AztlanLC
05-16-2012, 06:56 PM
By looking at the pictures I can see water travel from on end of the house to the other my advice for a long lasting installation catch the water before it gets to the patio, catch basin or channel drain, run solid pipes under the patio, connect gutters and daylight to the other end far away from the house , how big of a catch basin? well you have to measure the area and calculate how much run off will be, but I can assure you it needs some type of drainage.

AztlanLC
05-16-2012, 06:58 PM
build it once build it right it might not show in 3 weeks a month or maybe a year but I can see many issues there.

alldayrj
05-16-2012, 08:59 PM
While were on the subject Anyone have a formula for sf of drainage area to gallons in a drywell?
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AztlanLC
05-16-2012, 10:03 PM
I haven't seen a specific formula myself but some other members migh know it, what I do know it's basec on the type of soil you have and the percolation rate of the site, it's like when building a leach fill you have to do some test holes

alldayrj
05-16-2012, 10:04 PM
Yea I'm just looking for something general. I always dig to sand anyway
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AztlanLC
05-16-2012, 10:20 PM
http://www.poribesh.org/Documents/drywell.pdf

This you shoul reas tough

alldayrj
05-16-2012, 11:37 PM
its all in metric speak, and says to inspect your drywell 4 times per year, no thanks haha

Moneypit
05-16-2012, 11:53 PM
I'm almost certain that you have to design a drywell to handle a 4" rainfall here in NY.

alldayrj
05-17-2012, 12:16 AM
so big enough to handle 4" over the SF that you have draining to it? 4" in 4 hours is a lot more than 4" over 24 hours, guess thats where the variable soils come in to play too

Moneypit
05-17-2012, 11:01 PM
It's just 4"s. No time frame. That dictates the size or volume of the drywell.
So, in other words, if you had a 1,000 sq ft patio then you would need a drywell of at least 334 sq ft. which would be one 4' tall x 8' diameter precast drywell.
Its obviously less if you were taking the runoff from an area other then a roof or paved surface.

rpearlberg
05-18-2012, 10:34 AM
You do not fix standing water issues with "sand" and "gravel". Oh my heavens.

Water issues are remedied:
1) proper grading. Sloping the ground accordingly to ensure positive run-off.
2) drywells. And perforated flexible drain tubing
3) drain boxes such as Duraslope


I'm on a jobsite lookin at your pic on a 2x3.5" screen. I'll take a look again tonight on another computer and will advise intelligently.

Also need more info from you. the pics are of the sideyard. Are you putting the pato on the side? How bout pics of where the patio is to go? Along with pics of the lowest point of the yard? Is the front lower than the back?? Where does the water go now? Please elaborate. Also, we're all busy, it's hard to sit here and envision your overall plans and site. The More pics and details - the better feedback you'll receive :)


.

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Posted via Mobile Device

This is the backyard. We plan to remove the landscape timbers and mulch and put the pavers right up to the house, the full length of the back of the house and then out to the fence (leaving about 18-24" of space to the fence for landscaping). The lowest point is probably right in the middle where the puddle is and then the plan is to drain it from the far end of the pic back towards the close end of the pic and then down a little slope towards a creek....

2brothersyardcare
05-22-2012, 09:26 AM
I usually don't get home until after 5:30pm...what company are you with?

I'm with Two Brothers Yard Care if your still interested give me a call we can set up a meeting, I have some ideas that could work out and be a lot better.

DVS Hardscaper
05-22-2012, 10:51 AM
I usually don't get home until after 5:30pm...what company are you with?


A little secret:


Make sure you have a cold beer for the contractor!!

And no! They don't wanna meet and pet any yippy yappy rat dogs!