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View Full Version : My first estimate for a New Irrigation System.


KrayzKajun
05-25-2012, 02:40 PM
went looked at a residence today in the same community i just finished up a big landscape install in. homeowner wants an irrigation system installed in the whole front yard inorder to save the turf that was installed last year.:dizzy:

looks like this is going to be fun!! Can anyone say TREE ROOTS!!!!!!!!

:cry::cry::cry::cry:

Mike Leary
05-25-2012, 03:15 PM
Can anyone say TREE ROOTS!!!!!!!!

I'd be thinking either MP Rotators or Stream-Rotors to avoid damage to the tree trunks. Remember, trench INTO the root zones, rather than across. A couple of areas look almost impossible to into- trench, but do all you can to avoid tree stress/death. I used a Japanese fine-kerf saw to trim and a ton of 45s to get under/over. A lot of that looks like hand-work.

Stuttering Stan
05-25-2012, 03:31 PM
Price it high- way high. Roots are a BIG PITA and you will work your butt off digging trenches. If this is your first install, it will probably be your last install.

Mike Leary
05-25-2012, 04:14 PM
I learned about the Oriental "pull saws" from a shipwright when I was doing finish carpentry, they act on gravity, and are very accurate. When I got into pruning, I found them much better than traditional saws, even Felcos. They make such a clean cut that the chances of rot and disease are nill, and the wound heals clean and quickly. I used them on all root pruning, also.

KrayzKajun
05-25-2012, 04:57 PM
Thanks for the info mike. I don't think the homeowner has any idea what's involved in putting in a qaulity system. I think before I even start on the design I'm going to ask for a budget too determine if its worth my time.
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Mike Leary
05-25-2012, 05:09 PM
Thanks for the info mike. I don't think the homeowner has any idea what's involved in putting in a qaulity system. I think before I even start on the design I'm going to ask for a budget too determine if its worth my time.

Do you want the job? If you do, have some numbers ready, remember, EVERYONE has a budget. I've done a lot of projects where they could not do it all at once, and we worked off a "shoe box" sort of deal. "When the box is full, come on over." I did one where we planned for the entire system, and six years later, completed it to my and the owner's approval.

Tom Tom
05-25-2012, 05:28 PM
why even trench into that cluster of a mess....?

lay some pipe on the ground and paint it green

Mike Leary
05-25-2012, 05:35 PM
I know of an air-powered "root cleaner" that opens-up the area without trashing the bones. I'll check with the Arboretum that has one if you're interested.

KrayzKajun
05-25-2012, 05:37 PM
why even trench into that cluster of a mess....?

lay some pipe on the ground and paint it green

I like that idea!
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Mike Leary
05-25-2012, 05:41 PM
why even trench into that cluster of a mess....?

lay some pipe on the ground and paint it green

Sounds like something Dana taught you. :rolleyes:

greenmonster304
05-25-2012, 07:11 PM
I have heard of people missileing under tree roots to avoid damage.
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Wet_Boots
05-25-2012, 08:31 PM
get a Pipe Piper :)

Mike Leary
05-25-2012, 08:37 PM
The more I look at those pics, the more I'd be thinking of passing; unless you've got Mr. & Mrs. Deep Pockets. Even so, I would be worried about the trees and the lawyers if the trees stressed and/or croaked. Bail out.

DanaMac
05-25-2012, 08:38 PM
Sounds like something Dana taught you. :rolleyes:

Don't you be stealing my tricks now. :)
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Wet_Boots
05-25-2012, 08:48 PM
a thicket of trees is going to thin itself out, strictly by owner selection. Oak trees are not much worry at all.

This is a job made for poly and a plow (Pipe Piper, please) since you can take roundabout routes to give the worst trees some respectful distance.

CAPT Stream Rotar
05-25-2012, 09:52 PM
Either A PUll those lines far away as possible with a 410.
B Use an airspade or air compression to push the dirt away from the roots while not hurting them.
C Price that bad boy high and make sure to include a clause about the issue at hand

you can do it brotha...knock it out.

Autoflow
05-26-2012, 12:09 AM
Looks like a tough initiation into installing if you get it.

Price it very high. If they don't want to spend the money, tell em there is always this :o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tktInd9GCC4

FIMCO-MEISTER
05-26-2012, 09:48 AM
This might be one of the few jobs I'd consider subsurface with netafim. Keep your main trench closer to the street property line and netafim from there towards the house. Take the main trench up the property line with the neighbor into the backyard and pick up the front beds from there as well. Avoid spraying into tree trunks. Minimize the depth needed for trenching. They need to decide if they want trees or turf. Personally I'd water to the trees benefit and just mulch the bare spots that develop.

KrayzKajun
05-26-2012, 11:11 AM
I'm waiting for the homeowner to call me back, my 1st suggestion is going to raising the canopy on most of the trees to see how much sunlight the yard will get. It may be possible to run my main line around the out perimeter of the yard and run the laterals in towards the center too minimize root damage.
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Wet_Boots
05-26-2012, 11:20 AM
If you have the pressure, you would try to do as much as you can with big rotors in the corners, and on the outside edges of the lawn areas.

Kiril
05-26-2012, 11:33 AM
I'm waiting for the homeowner to call me back, my 1st suggestion is going to raising the canopy on most of the trees to see how much sunlight the yard will get. It may be possible to run my main line around the out perimeter of the yard and run the laterals in towards the center too minimize root damage.

Ummm, thinning the canopy would be more effective.

If you have the pressure, you would try to do as much as you can with big rotors in the corners, and on the outside edges of the lawn areas.

Barring the failure to mention also having the necessary flow volume to support a big rotor, I am in agreement .... that is if you don't just lose the turf like you should.

Wet_Boots
05-26-2012, 12:01 PM
Ummm, thinning the canopy would be more effective.People getting effective energy-saving shading from trees do not thin the canopies, and you could talk yourself blue in the face, and still they won't thin the canopies. The best way to get more sunlight into a tree-lover's lawn is to do as offered here, opening things up from underneath, giving more light to the lawn, while keeping the shade from the upper branches, which helps homes stay cool.

Mike Leary
05-26-2012, 12:09 PM
Before I broke ground,I would have a arborist/ plant pathologist come out, give me an idea of the health of the trees and some information as to projected root growth out beyond the drip line.

KrayzKajun
05-26-2012, 12:35 PM
Before I broke ground,I would have a arborist/ plant pathologist come out, give me an idea of the health of the trees and some information as to projected root growth out beyond the drip line.

I'm licensed Arborist, I would rather focus on the health and survival of the trees, rather than "TRY" to grow grass.
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Mike Leary
05-26-2012, 02:02 PM
I'm licensed Arborist, I would rather focus on the health and survival of the trees, rather than "TRY" to grow grass.

Agreed, turf can exist around trees, but it takes some doing, since the water requirements are different, mandating separate zones.

Duekster
05-26-2012, 02:21 PM
I like trees more than turf but that is too many trees, partcularly the pines. I would likely pass on this one from the pictures. Hard to get the depth perception but not hard to tell there is too many tress in that yard in general and too many to work around.

Wet_Boots
05-26-2012, 04:21 PM
If there is great pressure, it should be possible to cover all from the outside edges, and not shortchange anyone. With my old Pipe Piper, I'd take that gig in a microsecond.

Duekster
05-26-2012, 04:23 PM
If there is great pressure, it should be possible to cover all from the outside edges, and not shortchange anyone. With my old Pipe Piper, I'd take that gig in a microsecond.

You going to bank shot some water off the trees? You can not cover this from the outside, not and meet Texas code anyway.... I know this is not a Texas job site.

Kiril
05-26-2012, 04:58 PM
people getting effective energy-saving shading from trees do not thin the canopies, and you could talk yourself blue in the face, and still they won't thin the canopies. The best way to get more sunlight into a tree-lover's lawn is to do as offered here, opening things up from underneath, giving more light to the lawn, while keeping the shade from the upper branches, which helps homes stay cool.

bullshiit!

I'm licensed Arborist, I would rather focus on the health and survival of the trees, rather than "TRY" to grow grass.

Than lose the grass .... as an arborist you should well know it is far from an ideal situation to irrigate trees based on turf grass requirements.

Wet_Boots
05-26-2012, 05:04 PM
You cannot get people saving energy to expose their home to more sunlight, and that is that. They won't do it, and you can't make them. But they'll still buy sprinkler systems.

Kiril
05-26-2012, 05:11 PM
You cannot get people saving energy to expose their home to more sunlight, and that is that. They won't do it, and you can't make them. But they'll still buy sprinkler systems.

And more blah, blah, blah.

Wet_Boots
05-26-2012, 05:20 PM
Truth, Magnet Boy. Truth. Better these folks have some change left over to buy sprinklers.

FIMCO-MEISTER
05-26-2012, 07:20 PM
I prefer the mass tree look to the one giant stately tree look. Trees mean ticks though. If I had stayed in my old house my next project was going to mass plant river birches. No lectures please. River birch bark looks cool and the look meets my precepts of feng shui.

1idejim
05-26-2012, 07:40 PM
I like trees more than turf but that is too many trees, partcularly the pines. I would likely pass on this one from the pictures. Hard to get the depth perception but not hard to tell there is too many tress in that yard in general and too many to work around.

try closing 1 eye :rolleyes:

muddywater
05-26-2012, 09:08 PM
Trench through them. The trees are ugly. Pine trees have a tap root, you are not going to kill them.

Price it high because of roots? Really? How many more man hours will it really take?

Homeowner would have a price before i left the site. Easy job.

Alot of analysis for a small job on 200k house.

Mike Leary
05-26-2012, 09:52 PM
Trench through them. The trees are ugly. Pine trees have a tap root, you are not going to kill them.

Price it high because of roots? Really? How many more man hours will it really take?

Homeowner would have a price before i left the site. Easy job.

Alot of analysis for a small job on 200k house.

Analysis for a pin-head job is just as important as a mega. What, maybe Aunt Bee planted those pines, maybe they're important to them. Who cares? You'd be the first contractor down the driveway with that attitude. By the way, you forgot your cone markers.

muddywater
05-27-2012, 07:29 AM
Analysis for a pin-head job is just as important as a mega. What, maybe Aunt Bee planted those pines, maybe they're important to them. Who cares? You'd be the first contractor down the driveway with that attitude. By the way, you forgot your cone markers.


The more I look at those pics, the more I'd be thinking of passing; unless you've got Mr. & Mrs. Deep Pockets. Even so, I would be worried about the trees and the lawyers if the trees stressed and/or croaked. Bail out.

Well at least they would have a price, I wouldn't "pass." I could understand if it was big beautiful oak trees or 100 year old live oaks... but pine trees and scrub oaks????