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kirk1701
06-07-2012, 12:10 AM
Hey guys, just looking ahead here and seeing if this is a fungus or stress on the trunk or if anything at all I should be concerned with.

A little background, this tree is over 200 feet tall, don't know what kind it is but its on the property line and the neighbor though she was going to get one up and make it fall our way. She cut all the branches off going in her direction right against the trunk. The only branch left was one great big limb that extended out 75 feet and was just about to our house so we had it cut, left the rest because its on her and we've took care of enough of her tree's on the property line. This was 2010 and now the only thing left is the main trunk of the tree which goes straight up and then leans in her direction so its hers.

Now, I'm noticing a white colorerd area on the bark which I'm just curious as to what it is. From the first photo you can see it from a distance just at the top of the privacy fence

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/307019_3006376371879_1636527708_2030728_1032083875_n.jpg

This just gives an idea how tall the tree is
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/303553_3006376651886_1497379794_n.jpg

And two pics of the bark up close and closer
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/526967_3006376891892_977269738_n.jpg

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/209001_3006377051896_498945122_n.jpg

Could this be stress on the trunk from both parties cutting limbs off and now causing more weight on the trunk then it can handle? Making it where it will eventually give and fall?

Dr.NewEarth
06-07-2012, 11:38 PM
The crown looks healthy and full. You have good trunk taper (as it goes into the ground)

I've seen this before and don't believe that it will bring upon an early dimise of this tree. I had a look through a tree disease manual that I have, and haven't located your affliction. Although, my book is put out by our Federal Government for British Columbia, in particular.

I don't see any obvious signs of decline...no konks or dead branches, no cracking of the soil etc.

As a tree gets older, it's more difficult for it to heal from severe pruning episodes. Young trees have more energy to put into healing. As for the lean, a tree will stabilize itself even if it has a crooked trunk. They're actually quite adaptive and almost intelligent.

Although the discoloured bark is noticeable, I would not fret.

Monitor it for signs of decline in the canopy or a dead top, conks or other fruiting bodies, and keep an eye on the soil.

It's difficult to do a proper assessment from photographs, although you have give us some good pictures.

If you're still concerned, please call an I.S.A. Certified Arborist familiar with your native trees to have a look at it. The money spent should give you peace of mind.

www.isa.com

Darryl G
06-07-2012, 11:55 PM
200 feet...I don't think so but guess it don't really matter.

kirk1701
06-08-2012, 12:01 AM
The crown looks healthy and full. You have good trunk taper (as it goes into the ground)

I've seen this before and don't believe that it will bring upon an early dimise of this tree. I had a look through a tree disease manual that I have, and haven't located your affliction. Although, my book is put out by our Federal Government for British Columbia, in particular.

I don't see any obvious signs of decline...no konks or dead branches, no cracking of the soil etc.

As a tree gets older, it's more difficult for it to heal from severe pruning episodes. Young trees have more energy to put into healing. As for the lean, a tree will stabilize itself even if it has a crooked trunk. They're actually quite adaptive and almost intelligent.

Although the discoloured bark is noticeable, I would not fret.

Monitor it for signs of decline in the canopy or a dead top, conks or other fruiting bodies, and keep an eye on the soil.

It's difficult to do a proper assessment from photographs, although you have give us some good pictures.

If you're still concerned, please call an I.S.A. Certified Arborist familiar with your native trees to have a look at it. The money spent should give you peace of mind.

www.isa.com

Thanks Dr.NewEarth,
I'm not overly concerned as it is on the property line and mostly the neighbors now. However, if anything needed to be done I would first call our insurance company and have them notify the next door neighbor (No contact with her or little as possible always ends badly). This way, any damage like if it was uprooted and damaged our fence or landscaping it would be her responsibility.

She had another tree close to this one which was dead and when we bought the property. Our insurance Co. did the same thing then but this tree was all on her property and she had to remove it or be held responsible if it fell our way.

Think thats what started the bad blood between us also.

Thanks Bud, I'll keep an eye out if it gets bigger but feel safer knowing its nothing needs to be done ASAP.

mdvaden
06-11-2012, 09:34 PM
200 feet...I don't think so but guess it don't really matter.

ho .. .. ho .. yes it does !

I don't think you have one tree over there on that entire half of the USA over 200 feet tall.

In 2011, I think Will Blozan and team measured a Tulip Poplar in the 192' range. New east side champ for height. I heard of a Boogerman Pine that breached 200 feet, but the top blew out.

************

RE the tree of this posting, that could be as simple as a region of some lichen or something on the trunk. Not sure if water hits it, but I've seen sprinklers hit high before and discolor part of trunks.

Is there a chance that side used to be shaded one, with a gap toward the sun where the light area is?

gunsnroses
06-18-2012, 02:04 PM
[B][SIZE="3"] Not sure if water hits it, but I've seen sprinklers hit high before and discolor part of trunks.

this is what I was thinking....looking at the angle, you may have a rotor about where the gate is. Usually you see this in a place like a golf course where the psi is 90+

Mark Oomkes
06-18-2012, 05:09 PM
Unless I'm mistaken, I'd be more worried about EAB than discolored bark.