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jabbo
06-19-2012, 08:45 AM
How about some recommendations. I am a homeowner that has been coming to this site for years now. I started doing my homework to be able to put my own system in and finally did 4-5 years ago and it's doing great. I water alittle over an acre and I am on a well. So now I am in the process of drawing up a system for my dad. He will be watering about the same amount but he is on city water. Presently he is getting his 3/4" meter changed to a 1". He has plenty of pressure. His front yard, which is probably half the system is full sun. His backyard has big pines so it's mostly in the shade most of the day. I know back when I installed my system I used pgp's and now have added some pgp ultras to some of the dryer spots around the edges. I really like the ultras with the blue nozzles!!! I was just wanting to get some feedback as to what most would use in the big open front yard and in the back. I have already said I would go with the ultras most everywhere but wanted to see if ya'll have anything different that I might not be considering, i.e MP rotators, 1-20's, or some other type head. We have not done a flow test yet, just waiting on the meter to be changed. The POC is going to be the lowest point on the system so I need to figure out the backflow also...I have no trouble with layout, head spacing, or anything like that, just wanted to make sure I give him the best bang for the buck and the latest and greatest. Thanks!

Wet_Boots
06-19-2012, 08:57 AM
Since you're going uphill from the POC, you want to figure on using an RPZ as backflow preventer. Just what the current state of the code is there, I don't know, but regional codes all wind up with an RPZ when elevation is against you, and it is far easier to go ahead and install it, and work from the reduced pressure, rather than to try to figure things out later on, if an RPZ gets retrofitted into a system not designed for one.

Wet_Boots
06-19-2012, 09:08 AM
By the way, if you do have a good water supply, both pressure and flow, you might want to consider going retro with Toro Stream Rotors. Not cheap, but probably the most reliable product you can install, besides looking awesome in operation.

FIMCO-MEISTER
06-19-2012, 09:46 AM
I will make my usual suggestion of using the Rainbird 5000sam/prs with the low angle nozzle.

jabbo
06-19-2012, 09:54 AM
Can get the 4" for $7.43 a piece. Tell me what you like/dislike about them. I can remember you talking about them but not specifically...Thanks!

I will make my usual suggestion of using the Rainbird 5000sam/prs with the low angle nozzle.

Kiril
06-19-2012, 10:03 AM
Since you're going uphill from the POC, you want to figure on using an RPZ as backflow preventer. Just what the current state of the code is there, I don't know, but regional codes all wind up with an RPZ when elevation is against you, and it is far easier to go ahead and install it, and work from the reduced pressure, rather than to try to figure things out later on, if an RPZ gets retrofitted into a system not designed for one.

Holy shiit, I actually agree with something boots said. :clapping: :laugh:

By the way, if you do have a good water supply, both pressure and flow, you might want to consider going retro with Toro Stream Rotors. Not cheap, but probably the most reliable product you can install, besides looking awesome in operation.

And then he has to ruin the good feeling.

jabbo
06-19-2012, 10:49 AM
One of the issues I'm dealing with is watering out to the street. :rolleyes: And yes I've read over the years where yall have hashed it out about this one...:dizzy: There is no sidewalk or curb and the yard is about 2 feet HIGHER than the ashalt(yes I know that sounds backwards). The distance it takes the yard to level out onto the street is about 14 feet from the edge of the ashalt. I was thinking about using a row of square pattern sprays like Hunter has and put them up where the yard levels back out. It would do a 17' X 17" square pattern... Or maybe use those "side strip" nozzles. My dad does not want to put any heads down in the ditch area because thats where the main runs down the street. So what ya think???

ArTurf
06-19-2012, 01:04 PM
My vote is for the RB5000 sam. PGP's are a seal leaking SOB. I've replaced hundreds. The 5000 is also just plain easier to work with in alot of ways.

The square pattern would probably work. I guess you would need to put half circles on the ends which wouldnt be perfect but prob good enough. They take alot of water though 4GPM. Be sure to space head to head and not to the edge of the pattern.

jabbo
06-19-2012, 02:47 PM
Yea I am going to space head to head...

My vote is for the RB5000 sam. PGP's are a seal leaking SOB. I've replaced hundreds. The 5000 is also just plain easier to work with in alot of ways.

The square pattern would probably work. I guess you would need to put half circles on the ends which wouldnt be perfect but prob good enough. They take alot of water though 4GPM. Be sure to space head to head and not to the edge of the pattern.

1idejim
06-19-2012, 05:33 PM
Yea I am going to space head to head...

don't usually post about irrigation design but my theory is that head to head design is bunk.

system performance gets worse with age, not better. parts wear and water supply and pressures taper off, they don't increase.

i believe that you must plan for a 10-15% reduction in performance to begin with as you can always tune the sytem down in the begining and up as needed.

Kiril
06-19-2012, 07:41 PM
don't usually post about irrigation design but my theory is that head to head design is bunk.

system performance gets worse with age, not better. parts wear and water supply and pressures taper off, they don't increase.

i believe that you must plan for a 10-15% reduction in performance to begin with as you can always tune the sytem down in the begining and up as needed.

Bingo. Give the man a cookie. 15-20% is my rule of thumb.

FIMCO-MEISTER
06-19-2012, 09:34 PM
You can put the 10-15% reduction in the pressure calculations. I wouldn't necessarily do it with spacing. Wouldn't stretch the spacing either.

The 5000 sam/prs will even out the pressure to all the rotors and cut down considerably on misting. Plus eliminating low head drainage and soggy spots around rotors which leads to other problems. The LA nozzle does better in wind as well as lose less to evaporation since the water isn't be blown 15' in the air. On the bottom of slopes though use the standard nozzle and the low angle at the top of the slope.

jabbo
06-20-2012, 07:41 AM
I have been reading up on these heads. Looks like a good head. Especially the one with the flow stop. I used all hunter stuff on my system so I don't have alot of experience with RB. Anybody got any pics of the 5000 sams in action???

You can put the 10-15% reduction in the pressure calculations. I wouldn't necessarily do it with spacing. Wouldn't stretch the spacing either.

The 5000 sam/prs will even out the pressure to all the rotors and cut down considerably on misting. Plus eliminating low head drainage and soggy spots around rotors which leads to other problems. The LA nozzle does better in wind as well as lose less to evaporation since the water isn't be blown 15' in the air. On the bottom of slopes though use the standard nozzle and the low angle at the top of the slope.

Mike Leary
06-20-2012, 12:57 PM
Anybody got any pics of the 5000 sams in action???

5000 SAM 6" stainless:

jabbo
06-22-2012, 08:10 AM
Now what about the controller??? I have a Pro C and have never had so much as a hick-up from it(5 yrs.). But now we have these "smart controllers" so i was just wanting to get some feedback on these. I doubt my dad would be willing to go the whole 9 yards as far as putting sensors all over the yard but I would like some feedback on this....

jabbo
06-22-2012, 09:45 AM
I was looking at the smart controller that Rainbird makes and wondering if it does as good as they claim it does??? If it does, the price is not all that bad...

ArTurf
06-22-2012, 03:28 PM
I was looking at the smart controller that Rainbird makes and wondering if it does as good as they claim it does??? If it does, the price is not all that bad...

I have not personally used this smart system but my opinion of systems that adjust run times only are not the way to go. Some of the more expensive systems adjust frequency which in my opinion is the best way to do it. Then and again I believe an observant person with common sense can do the best job but most of my customers cannot acomplish this.

DanaMac
06-22-2012, 03:35 PM
Then and again I believe an observant person with common sense can do the best job but most of my customers cannot acomplish this.

:clapping::clapping::clapping:

Kiril
06-22-2012, 08:00 PM
I have not personally used this smart system but my opinion of systems that adjust run times only are not the way to go. Some of the more expensive systems adjust frequency which in my opinion is the best way to do it.

Interval and runtime. Intervals can be adjusted manually if needed however, once you have collected and crunched the data required to actually know what an appropriate interval is.

Then and again I believe an observant person with common sense can do the best job but most of my customers cannot acomplish this.

Most people (and irrigators) do not have the equipment or knowledge to do this correctly, nor will most clients pay for the daily babysitting you "should" get from a smart controller. So what you end up with is an "ass" schedule (aka lawnboy schedule), which more likely than not is applying way too much water.