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mrsteve
06-27-2012, 06:13 PM
I was checking a property today that has high pressure and decided to try and regulate it with the flow control on the master valve. First I took a reading (all dynamic) at a spray head near the higher elevation of the system, it was 72psi. Then took another station that was slightly smaller in gallons and lower in elevation, it was 80psi. With the gauge still connected I started to turn down the flow control on the master, all the time checking the pressure. I had to go down to where I was only about one turn from closed to make a reduction. The head that was 80 is now 50, and the head that was 72 is now 40. I didn't want to go any lower because I have two rotor sections. It seems to work, the valve wasn't hissing nor did it snap close. What are the concerns with this approach to reducing pressure?

Wet_Boots
06-27-2012, 07:34 PM
cheapsh!t way to operate when a module added to the valve gets you true regulation

greenmonster304
06-27-2012, 07:42 PM
cheapsh!t way to operate when a module added to the valve gets you true regulation

This module is only like $40.
Posted via Mobile Device

mrsteve
06-27-2012, 07:46 PM
cheapsh!t way to operate when a module added to the valve gets you true regulation
I'm listening. What do I gain? I've got a regulator on a zone valve and wonder what's the difference. Tell me why and I'll put a prs dial on this master. Especially if it is going to damage something. Even with the dial you are closing the flow way down.

irritation
06-27-2012, 07:48 PM
What are the concerns with this approach to reducing pressure?

I find temperature and humidity both effect how flow control works. Same with using the screw on spray nozzles.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 08:21 PM
That is a pretty good valve. Flow control is not pressure controll however.
Work off the furthest run first then balance the rest at the station valve.

Best you can do with what is at hand but you could recommend pressure compensation.

If you ask here you will get more of the same type of advice from all concerned.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 08:22 PM
cheapsh!t way to operate when a module added to the valve gets you true regulation

Still better would be at the head regulation. :rolleyes:

Mike Leary
06-27-2012, 08:24 PM
I find temperature and humidity both effect how flow control works. Same with using the screw on spray nozzles.

Not to mention what phase the moon is in.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 08:37 PM
Not to mention what phase the moon is in.

That is your period... :laugh:

Wet_Boots
06-27-2012, 08:37 PM
Still better would be at the head regulation. :rolleyes:not when the head gets more pressure than the body and cap are rated for - knock it down at the master valve first

Duekster
06-27-2012, 08:40 PM
not when the head gets more pressure that the body and cap are rated for - knock it down at the master valve first

Sure, why not if that happens to be the case then I would expect the pipe to have problems too right?

irritation
06-27-2012, 08:49 PM
Only if you use some cheap ass pipe.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 08:51 PM
Only if you use some cheap ass pipe.

Or heads. :laugh:

mrsteve
06-27-2012, 08:58 PM
Or heads. :laugh:
Just happens that I exchanged a bunch of heads to the new Rain Bird RD 1804 PRS SAM on one zone that just got new sod. When I put the gauge (before turning down the master) on one of those heads it was rock steady at 30. Pretty cool.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 09:05 PM
Just happens that I exchanged a bunch of heads to the new Rain Bird RD 1804 PRS SAM on one zone that just got new sod. When I put the gauge (before turning down the master) on one of those heads it was rock steady at 30. Pretty cool.

There is no doubt in my mind at head PSI regulation is best but you have to sell it. Other options include zone then system.

it is what it is. Even if you adjust during the day, you have no way of knowing what the PSI during the day.

I will leave it at that for now.

Except, Flow control is not PSI control.

irritation
06-27-2012, 09:07 PM
Just happens that I exchanged a bunch of heads to the new Rain Bird RD 1804 PRS SAM.
Good luck, any debris from a pipe break makes those heads useless. I prefer the standard 1800.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 09:14 PM
Good luck, any debris from a pipe break makes those heads useless. I prefer the standard 1800.

From HD no doubt.

mrsteve
06-27-2012, 09:18 PM
Good luck, any debris from a pipe break makes those heads useless. I prefer the standard 1800.
Clarify that. Useless at regulating, the check feature or both. I'm after a better seal in the RD and retraction has been a problem with the regular 1804's. Debris could be a problem with the new flow stem deal I guess. That's the one that shoots a small stream up if the nozzle is removed.

irritation
06-27-2012, 09:22 PM
Both, and very time consuming to clean.

Duekster
06-27-2012, 09:25 PM
So wasting water is better!@

mrsteve
06-27-2012, 09:29 PM
Both, and very time consuming to clean.
Not saying it works, but the RD has a debris pocket at the bottom. Maybe just a R/B selling point.

irritation
06-27-2012, 09:32 PM
Yes, it goes back into the ground.

Wet_Boots
06-27-2012, 09:39 PM
Or heads. :laugh:75 psi is the rating of a popup spray - dude is giving them 80+

Duekster
06-27-2012, 09:43 PM
75 psi is the rating of a popup spray - dude is giving them 80+

http://www.hunterindustries.com/product/pop-bodies/pro-spray

•Recommended pressure range: 15 to 100 PSI

Wet_Boots
06-27-2012, 09:48 PM
everybody doesn't use those heads - good thing he doesn't have Orbit heads

Duekster
06-27-2012, 10:20 PM
everybody doesn't use those heads - good thing he doesn't have Orbit heads

If the pressure were higher they would be in orbit.


If I had hi PSI and wanted to optimize water conservation and pressure regullation at the head....


Just because everybody does not make good choices does not mean I to too

Sprinkus
06-27-2012, 10:28 PM
Did they remove the chemically treated seal, which helped prevent root intrusion, from the RD 1800?
It seemed like a great idea, my only question was whether or not an RP would be required to use a head with a chemically treated seal.

mrsteve
06-27-2012, 10:44 PM
Didn't know about that

bcg
06-28-2012, 12:14 AM
Did they remove the chemically treated seal, which helped prevent root intrusion, from the RD 1800?
It seemed like a great idea, my only question was whether or not an RP would be required to use a head with a chemically treated seal.

In Tx, the law is crystal clear on that. If there is chemical, an RP is required. That even applies to the SDI with root inhibitor. TCEQ's position is that if there is any chemical then they believe it's reasonable to expect backpressure as well.