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Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 02:56 PM
Been letting my lawn boy logic get in the way for too long on this one I think. TELL ME IF MY LINE OF THINKING IS INCORRECT HERE.

I have known about attrimec by Gordon's for awhile now, but have always held off on purchasing it because the initial cost. That is until this coming Monday when I will be picking up my first Gallon of it.

After reading the label - the Three major plants I see it being used on (Viburnum and Eugenia and Ligustrum trees/shrubs) call for 2oz per gallon of water = 400 to 600 square foot of shrub.

According the the representatives that I have spoken to I can expect growth ******ation/ not sure why by it would not me use that word but lets call it limited growth, for 3 to 4 months from this application.

I am still working on getting chemical companies to give the best cost but right now if purchasing a gallon my cost per application (again 400 to 600 square ft to label) will be in the mid $2 range.

If I have figured this correctly it does not take much common sense (non lawn boy logic that is) to figure out that you labor saving will be realized very quickly with this product on properties with at least the three shrubs/trees listed above.

Am I missing something or has my lawn boy logic been in the way this entire time? Is the products residual truly that long? Would there not be a niche market with this that those of us with the limited license could offer, say to our existing customer base which maintain there own shrubs as we know they are not doing it because they enjoy it most of the time but rather they simply do not want to pay the cost of having them maintained by someone else.

Thoughts/Opinions on experiences with the product and my non lawn boy line of thinking about the use of this product and potential upsell niche market to potential clients?

williams lcm
06-30-2012, 03:25 PM
Many shrubs at my commericals are having to be cut every other week. They grow like crazy. Does this stuff real slow them down from growing? What about the vines that grow in the shrubs that pop up after a few days from being trimmed. My commericals have about 1hr worth of shrub trimming alone on each property. I think it would be worth it if you don't have to trim for 3 months.

Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 03:45 PM
Many shrubs at my commericals are having to be cut every other week. They grow like crazy. Does this stuff real slow them down from growing? What about the vines that grow in the shrubs that pop up after a few days from being trimmed. My commericals have about 1hr worth of shrub trimming alone on each property. I think it would be worth it if you don't have to trim for 3 months.

The vines in the shrubs I would assume you would have to know what they are and read the label William. I am assuming you are talking about essentially a weed as it sounds as if they are not wanted there? Would dabbing them with a Round up Solution not be a better long term plan for them - using a sponge dipped in RU or a pvc glue applicator etc so that you only hit the targeted plant?

But to answer you question - assuming the information that I am being given is correct, which is what I am looking for other FL LCO's past experiences with this product in this thread, I would assume if you figure your time is worth $40 to $70 a hour - then it would not take you long to realize a return on your investment in this product - if you are spend that amount of time ( a hr on some properties doing shrubs). It would only make sense if this product works as described as you would essentially be able to just take off a few stray growths with a pair of felco inbetween applications each week and keep them very formal without much man power.

Here is the label - see for yourself if the shrubs you are most often trimming are on the label. As I said there is plenty of use for my three main fast growing shrubs that consistently need trimmed or have spurts of growth which cause a extra trip to the trailer for the trimmer and of course the time to trim and clean up.


William here is a link to the label if you want to review http://www.pbigordon.com/pdfs/Atrimmec-SL.pdf

So anyone with experience want to share? Positive/Negative reviews.

greendoctor
06-30-2012, 04:59 PM
Atrimmec acts by killing the apical meristem. What I find is that there is some phytotoxicity, however the end effect is that the plant stays shorter and fills out. I have used it on stemmy hibiscus for that reason.

In my area, I do not know why growth regulators are unpopular. There is no such thing as leaving cuttings on property or at the curb. Landscapers must pay an arm and a leg for disposal unless they also have a 2 or 3 acre yard where they can dump stuff and let it rot. A rig like my engine drive backpack with disc-core nozzles would be the idea means to apply. 7 gallons applied in 7 minutes.

williams lcm
06-30-2012, 05:55 PM
Around here in my area the accesss clippings get blown under the shrubs(4-6 weeks of growth) If the shrubs are out of control then people bag them up. This is how most lco's do it around here or they blow the clippings into the yard to be mulched up by mower.

greendoctor
06-30-2012, 05:58 PM
Blow anything under the plants and there will be drama. The expectation is that clippings of any kind are cleaned up. Be it grass clippings or hedge/shrub clippings.

Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 06:59 PM
Blow anything under the plants and there will be drama. The expectation is that clippings of any kind are cleaned up. Be it grass clippings or hedge/shrub clippings.

William has it right that it is a accepted practice to blow short growth trimming right under the shrub. Is this the best practice..no...but it is a commonly accepted practice here by many in the commercial market for sure and even most of the home owner market. The best you can do is inform the consumer of why they should be removed and price it both ways for regular trimmings. The consumer is at least that way given the choice. I do have a few that are willing to pay for the extra time spent cleaning up the debris ...other still who do not but have nice enough looking properties that I will be a regular lawn boy and clean it up for free :hammerhead: just because it bothers me too much, however, there are those that do not care about there properties that are essentially just paying to "have the lawn and shrubs cut" and if they do not care but still want to pay then I figure I am still open for business, there are way too many trailers on the road in Florida for me to tell a customer that I simply would refuse to do it, and I am smart enough not to do it for free on all properties, because I know in the end, if I can not give them the desired look they want at the price the market will bare..someone else will.

Tri-City Outdoors
06-30-2012, 07:02 PM
I can tell you pgr's save you time. Time that you can apply at the next job. New growth is generally smaller and stunted. Making very little debris in the bed to blow under the bushes or in the yard to mulch. The only time we need to bag is when we let the plant gets overgrown or a clean up job. We actually still trim often but it is mostly the eye soars.

Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 07:16 PM
Atrimmec acts by killing the apical meristem. What I find is that there is some phytotoxicity, however the end effect is that the plant stays shorter and fills out. I have used it on stemmy hibiscus for that reason.

In my area, I do not know why growth regulators are unpopular. There is no such thing as leaving cuttings on property or at the curb. Landscapers must pay an arm and a leg for disposal unless they also have a 2 or 3 acre yard where they can dump stuff and let it rot. A rig like my engine drive backpack with disc-core nozzles would be the idea means to apply. 7 gallons applied in 7 minutes.

I can agree with disposal from your explanation. If it was not commonly accepted to leave for the homeowner to dispose of on their yard waste day here, a lco would incur great cost with waste produced in a given week from the cost of actually having enough space to hold all the debris, the time to dispose of it as well as the cost.

My thoughts with the redirected growth is that it maybe helpful to many of these shrubs, for example the older viburnum, which have been kept small and formal for many many years, all the leaves are on the outside two inches at most, if growth is redirected to create a more dense shrub I can not imagine that being a bad thing.

Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 07:19 PM
I can tell you pgr's save you time. Time that you can apply at the next job. New growth is generally smaller and stunted. Making very little debris in the bed to blow under the bushes or in the yard to mulch. The only time we need to bag is when we let the plant gets overgrown or a clean up job. We actually still trim often but it is mostly the eye soars.

That has been my understanding so far - the any growth that does occur is small and can be easily removed with a pair a felcos along the way which is not a issue as we always have on us vs going back to the trailer and grabbing the trimmer, then either the blower or the rack and garbage bag. I am hoping that this statements hold true.

How long have you used and does the gordons attrimmic seam to be the best value to you? Any other thoughts? I am starting with this one as I have been told by a few people that it is the best overall bang for the buck.

Patriot Services
06-30-2012, 07:21 PM
I've used Atrimmec for years. Primarily on Viburnum and Holly. Saves a ton of man hours this time of year. Label is spot on for app rate. Beware bounce back if you miss a dose. Yes you will notice more density. Clippings usually disappear when the mulch gets fluffed. Never had a complaint. Its more like green confetti than long clippings.
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Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 07:43 PM
I've used Atrimmec for years. Primarily on Viburnum and Holly. Saves a ton of man hours this time of year. Label is spot on for app rate. Beware bounce back if you miss a dose. Yes you will notice more density. Clippings usually disappear when the mulch gets fluffed. Never had a complaint. Its more like green confetti than long clippings.
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So in your experiance, Viburnum, do you experience 3 months or more of controlled growth? Are you allowing a bounce back period or applying again within a targeted time frame to keep them consistently easy to maintain?

Any Experience with Ligustrum and Eugenia ?

Duekster
06-30-2012, 07:56 PM
I have only used Cutless which controls over all growth. I think the one you are talking about controls vertical growth and promote horizontal growth. I think Green Dr alluded to this as well. I have never used it.

Those vines are a PITA and you have to find them and cut then at the ground. If possible pull them but that is not always so easy. Even without a PGR they will cause grief.

I think you can leave some clipping blown back under the shrubs but the lion share should be removed. Clippings can cup water and promote mesquites too.

We can dump them and better yet take them to a mulching facility offered by many land-field operations.
I do get tired to pay for stuff to be mulched and paying to buy the mulch but such is life.

Nothing should go down the storm drains. It is against the federal law. While it maybe common practice, you do not want to be the guy that makes the headlines when the government decides to send a message. Clients also want to seen as greener. If you want to shred and mulch then that is another program.

Some times it takes a few applications for the PGR's to kick in. I hit myown shrubs and they did not grow much for 18 months. They do work but it varies by plant type and app rate. Clip and treat per the lable, often they should happen at the same time or within 10 days.

Patriot Services
06-30-2012, 08:13 PM
So in your experiance, Viburnum, do you experience 3 months or more of controlled growth? Are you allowing a bounce back period or applying again within a targeted time frame to keep them consistently easy to maintain?

Any Experience with Ligustrum and Eugenia ?

3 months is about right. Tried it on Ligustrums with good results too. Just keep the app even. No idea on the Eugenia. I've had some Viburnum that haven't been majorly trimmed in 3 years. Waiting a week after trimming before applying eliminates any yellowing or browning.
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Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 08:53 PM
3 months is about right. Tried it on Ligustrums with good results too. Just keep the app even. No idea on the Eugenia. I've had some Viburnum that haven't been majorly trimmed in 3 years. Waiting a week after trimming before applying eliminates any yellowing or browning.
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Thanks for the info. The Rep told me it is best to treat right after they have been trimmed. The label say dependent on look desired formal or natural that you can wait up to three days. This is the type of advice I was looking for - real life tried and true experience.

Thanks for all that have had input up to this and I would appreciate any additional inputs from those that have used (good or bad) but as for now it is sounding like a win/win situation. :cool2:

Duekster
06-30-2012, 10:52 PM
Thanks for the info. The Rep told me it is best to treat right after they have been trimmed. The label say dependent on look desired formal or natural that you can wait up to three days. This is the type of advice I was looking for - real life tried and true experience.

Thanks for all that have had input up to this and I would appreciate any additional inputs from those that have used (good or bad) but as for now it is sounding like a win/win situation. :cool2:

FWIW, cutless is a granular so the yellowing is not an issue.

Landscape Poet
06-30-2012, 11:13 PM
FWIW, cutless is a granular so the yellowing is not an issue.

A granular would be a good approach but I am comfortable with the liquid as I do a good amount of fert and pest control on the shrubs and liquids is my primary method because I can ensure a good micro blend is being added.

Would you happen to have rough estimates on our cost per say every 100 square foot of shrubs with the cutless?

Duekster
06-30-2012, 11:28 PM
A granular would be a good approach but I am comfortable with the liquid as I do a good amount of fert and pest control on the shrubs and liquids is my primary method because I can ensure a good micro blend is being added.

Would you happen to have rough estimates on our cost per say every 100 square foot of shrubs with the cutless?I spray everything except cutless.

I will have to look up my cost in the AM

greendoctor
07-01-2012, 02:39 AM
I can agree with disposal from your explanation. If it was not commonly accepted to leave for the homeowner to dispose of on their yard waste day here, a lco would incur great cost with waste produced in a given week from the cost of actually having enough space to hold all the debris, the time to dispose of it as well as the cost.

My thoughts with the redirected growth is that it maybe helpful to many of these shrubs, for example the older viburnum, which have been kept small and formal for many many years, all the leaves are on the outside two inches at most, if growth is redirected to create a more dense shrub I can not imagine that being a bad thing.

The homeowners here have zero tolerance for any debris left in the landscape. If you tell them that leaving clippings under the shrubs is good for them, they will think you are too lazy to clean them up and they will find someone who will pick up everything. Same is true of grass clippings. Because of this, there is no such thing as a cheap lawn and if the lawn is 1/4 acre or more then the price does not come down due to size because of then need to pick up. Where it gets funny are the properties where they are chock full of palms and shrubs. You actually do not want that kind of account because people do not realize how bulky and hard to handle the trash is. Now if there were a safe way to stunt palm trees, I would be very happy. I hate palms. Do not like to see them in residential landscapes at all.

Duekster
07-01-2012, 10:31 AM
A granular would be a good approach but I am comfortable with the liquid as I do a good amount of fert and pest control on the shrubs and liquids is my primary method because I can ensure a good micro blend is being added.

Would you happen to have rough estimates on our cost per say every 100 square foot of shrubs with the cutless?

As a follow up.

again dose depends on plant height mass and how woody. More woody means more product.

Non-woody about $3 per 100 sf
Woody about $5.00 per 100 sf.

You need to trim within a few days of application and will likely need a couple of dose before you see a major change. From there light touch up twice a year should do it.

Sounds higher than your product

jvanvliet
07-01-2012, 10:53 AM
I want a PGR that has significant efficacy on ficus!

Landscape Poet
08-17-2014, 07:05 PM
Just to revisit this topic. ...I have been using it with great results after some issues. For us we tried going on the lower side of the recommendation and using the 2 oz per gallon on the viburnum and while they did slow growth they did not do so in a manner which was acceptable to us in terms of what we thought it should do. Slower growth ment we were tipping he shrubs and not actually trimming per say...but still the time of going over there and using the manpower to perform that was against the point of the product.

We then moved up to the higher rate of 3 oz per gallon directly after trimming viburnum. It is every thing I hoped it would be, very very limited growth and on some of our higher value homes, with them being surrounded with viburnums......it has paid for itself very easily.

My question that remains however is that the label says 2oz for ligustrum and eugenia ....anyone every try the 3 oz rate on these two so you are not mixing up separate batches? The ligustrums if not cared for by a L and O company seem to hold very well....if they are getting treated then it does slow the trimming needs at the 2oz rate but does not limit it like it does with the 3 oz rate on viburnums. Your experiences.

I did try like greendoctor said he did on some leggy hibiscus with good results too. I am sure it helped that I pruned them pretty hard right before as well....but it did work.

Patriot Services
08-17-2014, 07:40 PM
In hindsight aren't you glad you didn't go the granular route with all the rain we've had?
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Landscape Poet
08-17-2014, 09:43 PM
In hindsight aren't you glad you didn't go the granular route with all the rain we've had?
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Yes...it was challenging to get this sprayed at times with our rains. Sometimes we would trim a large hedge row ...it would be sun shinning and hot when we started the property....25 minutes later when finishing up....we were looking at rain clouds approaching. This stuff is not cheap so rather than risk it we would hold off and touch up shrubs at a later date and then spray. Overall ...good product with great results on the 3 oz rate for us on viburnum. If it was cheaper it would be great...but as in the rest of life good things tend to cost money.

Weekend cut easymoney
08-17-2014, 09:58 PM
Many shrubs at my commericals are having to be cut every other week. They grow like crazy. Does this stuff real slow them down from growing? What about the vines that grow in the shrubs that pop up after a few days from being trimmed. My commericals have about 1hr worth of shrub trimming alone on each property. I think it would be worth it if you don't have to trim for 3 months.

How often are you watering the plants?

Patriot Services
08-17-2014, 10:15 PM
How often are you watering the plants?

Nature has been drowning us almost daily. Plus the 90% humidity creates our very own greenhouse environment. Great joy to work in.
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Keith
08-18-2014, 01:00 AM
Cutless G has always held my viburnum quite well. But I was stunned at how well Atrimmec holds silverthorn.

Tri-City Outdoors
08-18-2014, 10:14 AM
For ligustrum we have used the 2oz/gallon.

However we wet the entire plant until the point of drip and then go back over again once it is dry. The 2nd application is focused on the top of the plant. On hot days and/or a heavy 2nd app. we have seen some burn. The next go around we are going to try the 2nd application in a few weeks after the 1st to see if that give us the control with out the burn.

Weekend cut easymoney
08-23-2014, 10:57 AM
Nature has been drowning us almost daily. Plus the 90% humidity creates our very own greenhouse environment. Great joy to work in.
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I forget that other partsfof the country get plenty of rain...we got humidity and heat, just scant rain...years ago when not much thought was given to watering every day on properties we'd kill ourselves trying to keep plants trimmed...then chenged to twice each week and magically less trimming was needed....
That wouldn't apply where your at with all the rain

Patriot Services
08-23-2014, 12:58 PM
Yea, we can't prune things into submission.
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Landscape Poet
08-24-2014, 08:16 PM
For ligustrum we have used the 2oz/gallon.

However we wet the entire plant until the point of drip and then go back over again once it is dry. The 2nd application is focused on the top of the plant. On hot days and/or a heavy 2nd app. we have seen some burn. The next go around we are going to try the 2nd application in a few weeks after the 1st to see if that give us the control with out the burn.

That is what I was wondering about. The burn potential. I am interested to see how your second application a few weeks apart holds. That is what we have tried after using 2oz on viburnum and not getting the stiffer hold we want...so we went to the three oz per app. Interested in seeing if you have the same result with the 2 oz apps overlapping more.

Patriot Services
09-13-2014, 12:46 PM
I stuck to the 2oz rate all season. Always sprayed post cutting. Great results, maybe just heavier handed. One more app this month and hoping to be good until December.
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bbdlawnscapes
10-03-2014, 03:11 AM
How does it work on plants 8-12ft tall and 4ft wide? I've got a residential that has about 2,500 linear feet of viburnum around 10ft tall. Obviously, this is very time consuming to maintain a neat and sharp appearance but I'm wondering how well it would work on these. The viburnum hedge is very mature, maybe 10 years old. Thanks for the input!

Landscape Poet
10-03-2014, 07:59 AM
How does it work on plants 8-12ft tall and 4ft wide? I've got a residential that has about 2,500 linear feet of viburnum around 10ft tall. Obviously, this is very time consuming to maintain a neat and sharp appearance but I'm wondering how well it would work on these. The viburnum hedge is very mature, maybe 10 years old. Thanks for the input!

It will work outstanding if applied correctly and at the correct time. That is one of our main uses in major rows of viburnum but to be honest we are lazy at this point and almost every viburnum gets it big or small.

Trim/prune it first and then apply directly after to keep the most formal shape.

bbdlawnscapes
10-07-2014, 12:48 AM
It will work outstanding if applied correctly and at the correct time. That is one of our main uses in major rows of viburnum but to be honest we are lazy at this point and almost every viburnum gets it big or small.

Trim/prune it first and then apply directly after to keep the most formal shape.

Awesome I cant wait to try it out, and I can imagine once you saw the effects of it applying it everywhere. It has to save a lot of time/money with not having to trim so often. I am anxious to try it out and Ill let you know how it goes. Thanks!

Patriot Services
10-07-2014, 09:47 AM
Just don't get lazy and forget to reapply at the proper interval. The bounceback effect will completely negate the time savings you enjoyed with the initial app. Its hard to say what that interval is, you just have to watch and see if you notice a slight increase in growth and reapply soon after. This wet summer made it a little quicker than normal but still saved a lot of labor from all the growth the rain would have provided.
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Landscape Poet
10-09-2014, 09:10 PM
Awesome I cant wait to try it out, and I can imagine once you saw the effects of it applying it everywhere. It has to save a lot of time/money with not having to trim so often. I am anxious to try it out and Ill let you know how it goes. Thanks!

You will enjoy it. As Patriot warned , you will start to know the bounce back, do not let it kick out all that new growth , apply again before then. It will take you a little to figure it out, but once you do it works amazing.

Eugenia topiary is another one of my favorites. Keeping that spiral tight with sheers is not exactly not time consuming, with a correct application it can go pretty flawless for you. I will warn you though if you get a blight or pest issue on these with the PGR in place...you will have to wait it out. That is the only bad thing.

It works well on ligustrums too. The not having to go to the truck and get the ladder is worth the cost right there.

bbdlawnscapes
10-09-2014, 10:57 PM
You will enjoy it. As Patriot warned , you will start to know the bounce back, do not let it kick out all that new growth , apply again before then. It will take you a little to figure it out, but once you do it works amazing.

Eugenia topiary is another one of my favorites. Keeping that spiral tight with sheers is not exactly not time consuming, with a correct application it can go pretty flawless for you. I will warn you though if you get a blight or pest issue on these with the PGR in place...you will have to wait it out. That is the only bad thing.

It works well on ligustrums too. The not having to go to the truck and get the ladder is worth the cost right there.
Got it. I just picked up my first bottle today. Have you tried it on loropetalum at all? Does it work well? Thanks for all the help guys.
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Landscape Poet
10-10-2014, 12:54 AM
Got it. I just picked up my first bottle today. Have you tried it on loropetalum at all? Does it work well? Thanks for all the help guys.
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I have not tried on loropetalum! Is it labeled for them? Remember the label is the law my friend.

bbdlawnscapes
10-10-2014, 01:58 AM
I have not tried on loropetalum! Is it labeled for them? Remember the label is the law my friend.

Right. I'm in the process of studying it and such. I just was thinking off the top of my head. Planning on doing an app on a row of viburnum at my place tomorrow to try it out. What about during the winter? Does the app rate change as the weather may have an effect on plant growth naturally? Or do you stick to a routine app which seems to be about 3-4months or so, even though a cold snap may stunt growth? Just trying to be as thorough as I can. This stuff ain't cheap!:hammerhead:

Landscape Poet
10-10-2014, 08:00 AM
Right. I'm in the process of studying it and such. I just was thinking off the top of my head. Planning on doing an app on a row of viburnum at my place tomorrow to try it out. What about during the winter? Does the app rate change as the weather may have an effect on plant growth naturally? Or do you stick to a routine app which seems to be about 3-4months or so, even though a cold snap may stunt growth? Just trying to be as thorough as I can. This stuff ain't cheap!:hammerhead:

Same rate. You will love it. I would start looking at about 8 to 10 weeks in and see how the plant is responding. I would advise you to let the plant to come out of it your first time around. That way you will understand what you are seeing and better understand your follow up apps in the future. If that makes sense.

bbdlawnscapes
10-21-2014, 01:06 AM
Same rate. You will love it. I would start looking at about 8 to 10 weeks in and see how the plant is responding. I would advise you to let the plant to come out of it your first time around. That way you will understand what you are seeing and better understand your follow up apps in the future. If that makes sense.

Well just to check in its been about two weeks since I did my first app and the viburnum I treated looks the same as when I first trimmed it. Things are starting to slow down a bit anyway but so far so good.

Patriot Services
10-23-2014, 07:02 PM
Well just to check in its been about two weeks since I did my first app and the viburnum I treated looks the same as when I first trimmed it. Things are starting to slow down a bit anyway but so far so good.


BTW which product did you choose?
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Landscape Poet
10-23-2014, 11:46 PM
Well just to check in its been about two weeks since I did my first app and the viburnum I treated looks the same as when I first trimmed it. Things are starting to slow down a bit anyway but so far so good.

If you applied right after pruning ....they will look like that for a good bit :D

bbdlawnscapes
10-24-2014, 12:58 AM
Patriot, I've been using the atrimmec. Poet, that's exactly what I did. Now I find myself thinking that I just need to spray it on all the viburnum and Eugenia and ligustrums I see. This property also has about 12 ligustum trees that are all "umbrella's". It seems to be holding them nice and tight as well. So far I am pleased with the product. I am through about half the gallon of the stuff now but I can definitely see the value in it, and its a lot less physically demanding than trimming hedges every other week.

Landscape Poet
10-24-2014, 07:52 AM
Patriot, I've been using the atrimmec. Poet, that's exactly what I did. Now I find myself thinking that I just need to spray it on all the viburnum and Eugenia and ligustrums I see. This property also has about 12 ligustum trees that are all "umbrella's". It seems to be holding them nice and tight as well. So far I am pleased with the product. I am through about half the gallon of the stuff now but I can definitely see the value in it, and its a lot less physically demanding than trimming hedges every other week.

Viburnum suck that is for sure, especially large rows. What brought me to the product was the ligustrums. Having to get a ladder out for them which in our area they are pretty common was time consuming and lets face it, on a hot day in July , the last thing you want to do is go back to the trailer and grab the ladder, set it up, move it a couple of times etc etc. Not to mention the clippings being cleaned up.

The Eugenia topiary was my second need. I keep very tight spirals and use grass shears , not a hedge trimmer, but during the peak parts of the year it would seem I would be trimming by hand every two weeks to keep the tight look I wanted. That is where this product helped me.

From there I went viburnum crazy too. Like I said it is actually kind of addictive and now it is not uncommon for me to spray a single 8 foot row of viburnum that is the only landscape on a small property just because I know it is that much less I will have to deal with even on a small property.

It is good stuff.

Wait until spring when you control the growth and how much time you will save not going through trimming and cleaning up clippings crazy at what seems to be the times you are already running behind. Good stuff .

Keith
10-25-2014, 12:35 PM
As I have mentioned I have been using Cutless granular on my large hedges for a few years now. It has always worked well for me on viburnum. I have always stuck with it because of the ease of application on say, a 8' tall x 6' wide x 75' hedge. Downside, that is a lot of Cutless and pretty expensive. How are you spraying your Atrimmec on the big stuff? Climbing up a ladder with the sprayer? Or just spraying them from the ground? In particular ligustrum and viburnum.

bbdlawnscapes
10-25-2014, 02:45 PM
Viburnum suck that is for sure, especially large rows. What brought me to the product was the ligustrums. Having to get a ladder out for them which in our area they are pretty common was time consuming and lets face it, on a hot day in July , the last thing you want to do is go back to the trailer and grab the ladder, set it up, move it a couple of times etc etc. Not to mention the clippings being cleaned up.

The Eugenia topiary was my second need. I keep very tight spirals and use grass shears , not a hedge trimmer, but during the peak parts of the year it would seem I would be trimming by hand every two weeks to keep the tight look I wanted. That is where this product helped me.

From there I went viburnum crazy too. Like I said it is actually kind of addictive and now it is not uncommon for me to spray a single 8 foot row of viburnum that is the only landscape on a small property just because I know it is that much less I will have to deal with even on a small property.

It is good stuff.

Wait until spring when you control the growth and how much time you will save not going through trimming and cleaning up clippings crazy at what seems to be the times you are already running behind. Good stuff .

Amen to that brother! Just trying to keep up with the mowing is hard enough during the summer months, let alone trying to keep hedges trimmed tight. I've decided to spray almost every hedge row i.e. Ligustrum, Eugenia, and viburnum that I know will grow like wild fire. Even my guys have been asking what is wrong with the hedges because they normally are dreading going there. Lol anyway I've shaved off about 2 hrs a day on trim week which we all know means $$$. Very excited about how well this is working for me.
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bbdlawnscapes
10-25-2014, 02:52 PM
As I have mentioned I have been using Cutless granular on my large hedges for a few years now. It has always worked well for me on viburnum. I have always stuck with it because of the ease of application on say, a 8' tall x 6' wide x 75' hedge. Downside, that is a lot of Cutless and pretty expensive. How are you spraying your Atrimmec on the big stuff? Climbing up a ladder with the sprayer? Or just spraying them from the ground? In particular ligustrum and viburnum.

For the most part I just spray from the ground. However I was thinking about getting a bag of cutless for the big hedge rows. How much does it cost in comparison to the atrimmec? When would you apply it? I agree it would be easier to do the granular on the big stuff but does it work as well as the atrimmec?
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fl-landscapes
10-25-2014, 04:50 PM
For the most part I just spray from the ground. However I was thinking about getting a bag of cutless for the big hedge rows. How much does it cost in comparison to the atrimmec? When would you apply it? I agree it would be easier to do the granular on the big stuff but does it work as well as the atrimmec?
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If you can water it in.

Landscape Poet
10-25-2014, 05:31 PM
. How are you spraying your Atrimmec on the big stuff? Climbing up a ladder with the sprayer? Or just spraying them from the ground? In particular ligustrum and viburnum.

Ladder. The tallest viburnum I have currently is roughly 9 to 10 foot tall and I can still apply to it without a ladder because the way it is shaped it is not flat top and is more rounded as the other half is on the neighbors property.

The ligustrum trees = ladder for sure

Keith
10-26-2014, 05:07 PM
For the most part I just spray from the ground. However I was thinking about getting a bag of cutless for the big hedge rows. How much does it cost in comparison to the atrimmec? When would you apply it? I agree it would be easier to do the granular on the big stuff but does it work as well as the atrimmec?
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It works well on viburnum. It is costly, and probably best relegated to big hedge rows that are difficult to spray. It's around $6 a pound. Rate is 3/4-2lb per 100 sq foot of bed. One example, on a 8' tall viburnum that is 75' long, but only has about 3' of bed directly under it, I typically use 4 lbs. Applied in the end of March it usually cuts the growth enough to until about the end of June. If reapplied and trimmed then I will get another 10 weeks with not much trimming necessary, just very light touch up. Because of the cost I usually cut the rate and use about 2 lbs on the whole thing two more times in the fall and winter. So the cost would be about $70-80 for the year.

I have found it works best to apply it one week, trim the next. Rather than trim and apply the same week. It obviously has to work it's way through the plant. The key is to reapply before it looks like you need to. But if you do, you think you might be wasting product. If you wait to reapply until you start seeing a large amount of new growth, I would trim it and use Atrimmec instead.

Atrimmec is going to be cheaper. It works faster. Then again, I haven't used Atrimmec on big hedges. I don't know how often you are having to reapply on those. Cutless may not cost any more. But it's so easy to load up a Spredrite-G with granules and call it done.

Keith
10-26-2014, 05:20 PM
BTW, a Spredrite-G is the best way I have found to apply Cutless G. They are about 35 bucks. Get a postage scale, weigh the Spredrite, then add Cutless and mark the side of the Spredrite in 1/2 or 1 pound increments so you can visually see how much you are putting down.

Landscape Poet
10-28-2014, 10:09 PM
BTW, a Spredrite-G is the best way I have found to apply Cutless G. They are about 35 bucks. Get a postage scale, weigh the Spredrite, then add Cutless and mark the side of the Spredrite in 1/2 or 1 pound increments so you can visually see how much you are putting down.

Interesting product. I do not do much of any granular at this point but a cool product if I still was myself.

Patriot Services
10-28-2014, 11:37 PM
Pricey and I feel the sprays are easier to control and your able to ensure coverage.
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