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Mikegyver
07-04-2012, 10:18 PM
I am in the process of preparing a bid for an irrigation system for a restaurant. There is one turf area and a flower bed near the main street, but the main areas needed to be irrigated are near the building itself. The restaurant sits in the middle of an older asphalt parking lot. Going underneath the asphalt without disturbance (i.e. torpedo) is not an option, just too much length of travel. I am not sure where the meter is but regardless of this we will need to go through the asphalt somewhere. Considering the shape the asphalt is in it will be no big deal to cut it up.
What is the best way of doing this? Or is this one of those ones where it would be best just to walk away? They are family friends of ours and plus it would be great advertisement for our company to work there. My main concern is getting the asphalt up plus not knowing what is underneath said asphalt. Any advice would be appreciated. At this point i am guessing we would have to score and pull up the asphalt, then trench, then put it all back together.
Thanks!

Mikegyver
07-04-2012, 10:23 PM
BTW, the sprinkler system itself will be a breeze, prob 1 zone for turf and one for the beds. The turf area is very small. Think there are 3 beds that need to be irrigated. Thinking drip on them. I think there will be good pressure (major street with tons of businesses and neighborhoods feeding from it so they should have hefty pressure at the street) so I could get away with one zone but think i really need to separate the turf from the other plants because of different watering requirements. That would be if I ran spray heads on all materials, I definitively would not run drip and spray heads on the same zone!!!

greenmonster304
07-04-2012, 10:28 PM
You Could directional drill it or use a k saw and cut the asphalt then dig. Either way call for mark out and hire a private mark out company to mark any consumer owned stuff like light posts etc.
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ed2hess
07-05-2012, 09:53 PM
You might want to check to see if irrigation can be attached to the resturant water line. I am pretty sure in our area you can't....at least all of our have seperate meter and back check. I see guys cutting that asphault all the time for lighting....usually hand held saw if not very far. They fill it back with concrete.

Mikegyver
07-05-2012, 11:56 PM
I could put it on the restaurant water but the majority of the stuff that needs watering is out in the parking lot itself. Either way I am going to have to go through asphalt for at least 50-100'.
What about using a pipe puller? Then i would not need a very wide cut in the asphalt (if any?)
When you mean K saw you mean kwik cut saw right?
Mike

greenmonster304
07-06-2012, 06:03 AM
K saw = gas powered saw with diamond blade. I have pulled through asphalt with my machine but it was across a residential driveway I don't think it would work in a parking lot.
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Mikegyver
07-06-2012, 08:59 AM
I figured that was what it was but I was just checking.
I'll get a pic of the asphalt this up coming week, its not every good and I'm beginning to wonder if I could get away with pulling through it since its so crumbled. Only thing is that the base is prob red clay and would be hard to pull through.
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mrsteve
07-06-2012, 09:06 AM
Curious to know if you are Licensed to install Irrigation in Texas?

Mikegyver
07-06-2012, 01:04 PM
I am a LI and BPAT. I am not a hack!!! I am still learning though.

mrsteve
07-06-2012, 02:19 PM
I am a LI and BPAT. I am not a hack!!! I am still learning though.
Glad to know that, It's too bad they don't teach the real world stuff in Irrigation school. You have the right attitude however and should go far. I hired myself and a supervisor of mine out to a a small company right after we got our licenses. We had four people doing an install and all four had licenses numbering from the 2000 to low 3000 numbers. I'd say it was the most qualified installers in Texas, but two of us were new and didn't know Jack yet. I asked questions and learned a great deal from that one job. Some of it was what not to do. I still ask questions and try to not make the same mistake twice. Still going strong almost thirty years later.

Duekster
07-06-2012, 02:40 PM
I know there are tricks to the trade I could learn, particularly on installs.

LOL, Mr Steve he does have LI and BPAT in his sig.

Duekster
07-06-2012, 02:46 PM
$.02 Trenching is often less than boring.

I am not a parking lot expert but I would think saw cutting, throwing down a sleeve and plently of spare wire is the key here.

You need to make nice with an experiance GC in your area about what is the best way to do this.

There are risk and as the story goes, the higher the risk the greater the reward. Then you have the friend issue.

I do not think connection to the restaurant water would be bad with a RZ. New small meter is often better on commerical irrigation. All have cost.

Pictures might help us get the lay of the land

mrsteve
07-06-2012, 03:24 PM
I know there are tricks to the trade I could learn, particularly on installs.

LOL, Mr Steve he does have LI and BPAT in his sig.
My bad, didn't read that far down. Must be the heat. I could learn a lot about installs too, but at this stage I'll stay with repair. Been there done that on installing.

Duekster
07-06-2012, 03:28 PM
My bad, didn't read that far down. Must be the heat. I could learn a lot about installs too, but at this stage I'll stay with repair. Been there done that on installing.

I would rather repair and trouble shoot too.

muddywater
07-07-2012, 11:57 PM
I would get someone to do a directional bore. They can do 1-4" sleeve. It prob aint cheap but cutting up parking lots and patching doesnt leave as good of a finishing product.

muddywater
07-07-2012, 11:57 PM
How many feet is it? I have bored under a parking lot with my dingo boring unit when i had to.

Without A Drought
07-08-2012, 05:11 PM
cut the asphalt, trench or dig it with a mini, put a sleeve in an fill and patch it.

Mikegyver
07-10-2012, 02:00 PM
Looks like I have a 65' trench to take out to a 17X60' bed (has maybe 10 sqft of turf, will include it in the same zone), then a 40' trench to take to a 5x5 bed next to the main entrance, then the main area which has a large (varies in width 6-12'x110') turf area and (14x45-56') shrub bed. The city main is in the main area. The areas we have to take the trenches through are full of utilities :(. I will try to get some pics uploaded.

stebs
07-10-2012, 04:03 PM
One thing you might look into is how the city charges sewer fees for commercial businesses... You might be money ahead to put a seperate "irrigation" meter in that does not charge sewer fees on the water used for irrigation.

ed2hess
07-13-2012, 10:04 PM
One thing you might look into is how the city charges sewer fees for commercial businesses... You might be money ahead to put a seperate "irrigation" meter in that does not charge sewer fees on the water used for irrigation.

We was just quoted $6K to jupgrade the meter size....unbelievable. There was a list of about 10 items including an engr study. A new service cost about $12k in our city. Very business friendly.

Duekster
07-14-2012, 09:07 AM
We was just quoted $6K to jupgrade the meter size....unbelievable. There was a list of about 10 items including an engr study. A new service cost about $12k in our city. Very business friendly.

Environmental impact fees associated with water meters. Many large lots go with two smaller meters opposite side of the lot connected to a looped main to reduce they initial and ongoing fees.

The point is still valid, you get to avoid sewer charges on a dedicated meter, plus you can have two smaller meters, one for the domestic use and one for the irrigation lowering the impact fees of the larger meter.

You are not just paying for the water meter but the distribution lines and sewer lines.