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grassmasterswilson
07-09-2012, 07:34 AM
I'm not a plant guy so looking for some help. We have had some really hot(100+ degrees) and dry days. Getting a break from both this week.

I redid our landscape this past feburary so most plant have been in the ground for about 5 months. All were looking nice and healthy up until now.

The Yews, rhododendrum, and acuba all look nice and healthy. The hydrangeas(i know the heat has worked on them), fothragilla, barberries, and some of the sweet shrubs are looking pretty bad. Wilting and leaf edges turning brown.

Most plants get hit by the pop up or rotor sprinklers. I've been running them daily for the last 3-4 weeks since I've done some lawn work. I may have fertilized at installation, but other than that they haven't gotten anything other than overspread from my lawn(which I've done 3 times in the past month)

Will they make it? What can I do? Hand water?

Duekster
07-09-2012, 07:58 AM
I'm not a plant guy so looking for some help. We have had some really hot(100+ degrees) and dry days. Getting a break from both this week.

I redid our landscape this past feburary so most plant have been in the ground for about 5 months. All were looking nice and healthy up until now.

The Yews, rhododendrum, and acuba all look nice and healthy. The hydrangeas(i know the heat has worked on them), fothragilla, barberries, and some of the sweet shrubs are looking pretty bad. Wilting and leaf edges turning brown.

Most plants get hit by the pop up or rotor sprinklers. I've been running them daily for the last 3-4 weeks since I've done some lawn work. I may have fertilized at installation, but other than that they haven't gotten anything other than overspread from my lawn(which I've done 3 times in the past month)

Will they make it? What can I do? Hand water?

Hand water until established.

cgaengineer
07-09-2012, 08:08 AM
Hand water until established.

And really water them...several gallons per plant...until the soil is mushy.
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grassmasterswilson
07-09-2012, 08:30 AM
What would I do without you two advisors!!!

Got an email from the local expert just now and she suggested hand watering for the first 1-2 years.

I just assumed that since they looked good and were growing that they had established themselves. I was wrong and it takes longer than I thought.
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Duekster
07-09-2012, 08:35 AM
You can back of the frequency in the second year.

Mulch helps too

White Gardens
07-09-2012, 08:36 AM
What would I do without you two advisors!!!

Got an email from the local expert just now and she suggested hand watering for the first 1-2 years.

I just assumed that since they looked good and were growing that they had established themselves. I was wrong and it takes longer than I thought.
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Same goes for trees planted in the past 3-5 years also.

Do bear in mind that plants will show signs of heat stress, but will still have plenty of water. So, if the plants are wilting in the heat of the day, but then recover during the coolest part of the day (such as the evening or early morning) then they have plenty of water and are just stressed. Hydrangeas are a perfect example of this.

Over-watering basically will show the same symptoms of under-watering.

.....

Duekster
07-09-2012, 08:43 AM
Same goes for trees planted in the past 3-5 years also.

Do bear in mind that plants will show signs of heat stress, but will still have plenty of water. So, if the plants are wilting in the heat of the day, but then recover during the coolest part of the day (such as the evening or early morning) then they have plenty of water and are just stressed. Hydrangeas are a perfect example of this.

Over-watering basically will show the same symptoms of under-watering.
.....

Hard to tell apart, weekly watering in the first summer and every other the second and once a month there after. I like to hand water my trees once a month anyway.

The way I have been told too tell the diff between too much and too little, Too little the tops stress first, too much the bottom show the most stress first.

cgaengineer
07-09-2012, 09:16 AM
What would I do without you two advisors!!!

Got an email from the local expert just now and she suggested hand watering for the first 1-2 years.

I just assumed that since they looked good and were growing that they had established themselves. I was wrong and it takes longer than I thought.
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Generally woody plants are good after one season and will require watering only during dry periods. I can tell you that shrubs respond well to watering and fertilizer much like grass does. Many people only think to water their lawns...they see the grass showing signs of drought stress but they never think about the shrubs doing the same thing.

I keep my shrubs watered when we are having dry spells...I have also just planted about 10 nandinas that I pulled from another house and although they are showing signs of transplant shock they are still doing ok.
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Busa Dave
07-09-2012, 10:44 AM
Hard to tell apart, weekly watering in the first summer and every other the second and once a month there after. I like to hand water my trees once a month anyway.

The way I have been told too tell the diff between too much and too little, Too little the tops stress first, too much the bottom show the most stress first.


Listen to this man he knows of what he speaks. Some plants will however, still wilt during the intense heat of the day esp if there is a wind. Unfortunately some plants and grasses transpire moisture faster than the plant can take it in extreme conditions. During the night they should recover unless there are other factors. There are some shrubs such as Indian Hawthorn that if allowed to wilt will be hard to recover without significant injury.

Hand watering new plants without established root systems is key for their survival during the 1st and sometimes the 2nd year depending on conditions. A simple moisture meter can help determine what the condition of the root ball around the plant is in. It is common to think that a irrigation system is getting enough moisture to the plant however the light planting mixes used by the nursery trade are not know for moisture retention due to their makeup.

White Gardens
07-09-2012, 04:28 PM
Hard to tell apart, weekly watering in the first summer and every other the second and once a month there after. I like to hand water my trees once a month anyway.

The way I have been told too tell the diff between too much and too little, Too little the tops stress first, too much the bottom show the most stress first.

I don't know if it's the heat stress on top of the lack of water, but I'm seeing stress throughout the entire plant.

....

Bunton Guy
07-09-2012, 04:56 PM
Don't water to much! plants need oxygen just like us. To much water for to long will choke out the oxygen supply to the roots. This is even more important when the soil has poor draining qualities.

Duekster
07-09-2012, 07:06 PM
I don't know if it's the heat stress on top of the lack of water, but I'm seeing stress throughout the entire plant.

....

Is the ground wet? if it is a newly planted shrub, you can see stress regarless of water. Pictures also help.

Smallaxe
07-09-2012, 08:56 PM
One might even poke a finger into the base of the questionable plants and feel moisture or dry... pretty hard to get overhead watering to actually soak the ground that faces away from the sprinkler head... To establish landscapes, especially in tricky areas, I set up soaker hoses under mulch for the first couple of years...
Also, there are many plants that do not like overhead watering at all... such as peonies and tomatoes...

Duekster
07-09-2012, 09:24 PM
One might even poke a finger into the base of the questionable plants and feel moisture or dry... pretty hard to get overhead watering to actually soak the ground that faces away from the sprinkler head... To establish landscapes, especially in tricky areas, I set up soaker hoses under mulch for the first couple of years...
Also, there are many plants that do not like overhead watering at all... such as peonies and tomatoes...


You put in soakers subsurface?

cgaengineer
07-09-2012, 09:44 PM
You put in soakers subsurface?

Under mulch he said...nothing wrong with using drip subsurface either...it works for septic fields, in fact if I knew I could do drip at 12" with minimal damage to my lawn it would be my first choice, no more wet lawn except when it rains.
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