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irritation
07-10-2012, 06:12 PM
It's bad around here. Reservoirs and lakes are very low, I have several pumps out of the water. They should have started restrictions a month ago but always wait till it's too late, now they're talking total ban. The town I live in has banned watering since June 29th.

http://www.indystar.com/article/20120710/NEWS/120710034/Citizens-Water-Indianapolis-verge-lawn-watering-ban?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|IndyStar.com

http://www.citizenswater.com/AboutCitizens/News.aspx?nid=243

1idejim
07-10-2012, 06:26 PM
It's bad around here. Reservoirs and lakes are very low, I have several pumps out of the water. They should have started restrictions a month ago but always wait till it's too late, now they're talking total ban. The town I live in has banned watering since June 29th.

http://www.indystar.com/article/20120710/NEWS/120710034/Citizens-Water-Indianapolis-verge-lawn-watering-ban?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|IndyStar.com

http://www.citizenswater.com/AboutCitizens/News.aspx?nid=243

No wonder you're so grumpy! My family in TX says the lakes are low and the farmers are being cut back, some are not even working the dirt.
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irritation
07-10-2012, 06:28 PM
Crops are toast here, too late for any help.

AI Inc
07-10-2012, 07:47 PM
WE had a very rainy spring so I doubt we will see anything besides the usual ood/even.

irritation
07-11-2012, 08:01 PM
too late for any help.

I stand corrected, sometimes disaster helps more than normal situations.:dizzy:

http://www.indystar.com/article/20120711/BUSINESS/207110326/Midwest-drought-USDA-announce-relief-farmers?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|IndyStar.com|p

irritation
07-13-2012, 05:25 PM
Ban went into effect today at noon. Almost all areas I service are banned from watering lawns.

DanaMac
07-13-2012, 06:23 PM
So what does that mean for your biz?
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irritation
07-13-2012, 06:40 PM
A huge slow down on service calls. Won't mean much to me, my main income is turn-ons and blow outs. It usually slows after spring turn-ons anyways but this year has been crazy. I guess the grass cutters are really feeling it.

1idejim
07-13-2012, 06:44 PM
Ban went into effect today at noon. Almost all areas I service are banned from watering lawns.

Don't take this wrong, will you winterize those systems early and then just focus on the opperational systems at the regular time?
I got screwed over on my water today after taking the day off to get things started off right. Now i won't get h2o until mid to late evening. Friday the 13th dude
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DanaMac
07-13-2012, 06:51 PM
CO is ok on water right now, due to the snow from 2010/2011. But if the winter is anything like this past one, we will be in major restrictions again in 2013. Nothing like planting blue grass in a non-native climate, at 6500', in a semi-arid area with 12"-16" total precip on the average. :dizzy:

irritation
07-13-2012, 06:55 PM
Don't take this wrong, will you winterize those systems early and then just focus on the opperational systems at the regular time?
I got screwed over on my water today after taking the day off to get things started off right. Now i won't get h2o until mid to late evening. Friday the 13th dude
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No, I hope we can water again before winterizations. Makes no sense to me to haul a compressor this time of year.

Duekster
07-13-2012, 07:16 PM
Watering bans / restrictions are normal in the S and SW States. The proper use of potable water in landscapes are a normal topic for many of us. Hence the reason Kiril gets so uptight about Landscape Management.

It is something we all need to consider even in good conditions.

If Indy wants some info tell them to call Ca, AZ, TX and even Ga when it got so bad they almost had to truck in drinking water for Atlanta a few years ago. When Ga got some rain they got sued by FL to release some of it.

Water management is no joke and should be SOP. Check out the Irrigation Association.

Duekster
07-13-2012, 07:18 PM
Don't take this wrong, will you winterize those systems early and then just focus on the opperational systems at the regular time?
I got screwed over on my water today after taking the day off to get things started off right. Now i won't get h2o until mid to late evening. Friday the 13th dude
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Get your Witching sticks out and go find ya some on Friday the 13th.
:dancing:

cgaengineer
07-13-2012, 07:27 PM
Watering bans / restrictions are normal in the S and SW States. The proper use of potable water in landscapes are a normal topic for many of us. Hence the reason Kiril gets so uptight about Landscape Management.

It is something we all need to consider even in good conditions.

If Indy wants some info tell them to call Ca, AZ, TX and even Ga when it got so bad they almost had to truck in drinking water for Atlanta a few years ago. When Ga got some rain they got sued by FL to release some of it.

Water management is no joke and should be SOP. Check out the Irrigation Association.

It gets bad here...in 2007 it was total bans, no water permits for even new landscaping...this just happened to be the summer I installed 7000 sq ft of sod...I was trucking in water 1000 gallons per night to keep my new sod alive. I did this until September when we finally got some rain and cooler temps. Just about every year now it's odd/even and before 10am.
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irritation
07-13-2012, 07:37 PM
What gets me is they didn't even restrict watering. They waited until it was too late and banned it. Almost all my lake pumps are out of the water. I think we've had .09" of rain since June 1st and not much in late May. Worst drought in a 104 years.

jvanvliet
07-13-2012, 07:51 PM
Water everywhere...

irritation
07-13-2012, 07:54 PM
Yea, Florida is good.

1idejim
07-13-2012, 08:02 PM
I wasn't talking about right now, maybe a little earlier than usual and lighten the workload.
Ditto on restriction/ban but you're no spring chicken and are well aware that the right choices are seldom made in public service
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irritation
07-13-2012, 08:06 PM
but you're no spring chicken

What tipped you off? :hammerhead:

1idejim
07-13-2012, 08:13 PM
What tipped you off? :hammerhead:

Just lucky i guess
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txirrigation
07-13-2012, 08:49 PM
No wonder you're so grumpy! My family in TX says the lakes are low and the farmers are being cut back, some are not even working the dirt.
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I have gotten 6.3" in the last 3 days. Your family is right though, corn did OK this year.

They cut back the rice farmers, which is going to destroy a town downstream of Lake Travis.

FIMCO-MEISTER
07-13-2012, 10:08 PM
I have gotten 6.3" in the last 3 days. Your family is right though, corn did OK this year.

They cut back the rice farmers, which is going to destroy a town downstream of Lake Travis.

Getting water to the bay is priority one.
Cities and towns #2
Rice and ag #3

Autoflow
07-13-2012, 11:36 PM
We had sprinklers completely banned here from late 2003 until mid 2009, with drip allowed two days per week. A lot of irrigation businesses went out of business. I concentrated on garden maintenance until the sprinkler ban was lifted. It sucked balls. I hope you guys never get that bad over there.

Duekster
07-14-2012, 08:41 AM
It gets bad here...in 2007 it was total bans, no water permits for even new landscaping...this just happened to be the summer I installed 7000 sq ft of sod...I was trucking in water 1000 gallons per night to keep my new sod alive. I did this until September when we finally got some rain and cooler temps. Just about every year now it's odd/even and before 10am.
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There are some water rights issues being fought in GA for sure.

I suspect conservation is going to be a way of life from now on in GA too

Duekster
07-14-2012, 08:42 AM
We had sprinklers completely banned here from late 2003 until mid 2009, with drip allowed two days per week. A lot of irrigation businesses went out of business. I concentrated on garden maintenance until the sprinkler ban was lifted. It sucked balls. I hope you guys never get that bad over there.

Lot of discussion about subsurface drip for turf and new drip technologies being tested for crops too.

cgaengineer
07-14-2012, 09:28 AM
Lot of discussion about subsurface drip for turf and new drip technologies being tested for crops too.

I think sub surface drip is a great idea, works great for non conventional septic systems. No need to worry about watering at night either.
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Kiril
07-14-2012, 09:32 AM
Don't take this wrong, will you winterize those systems early and then just focus on the opperational systems at the regular time?
I got screwed over on my water today after taking the day off to get things started off right. Now i won't get h2o until mid to late evening. Friday the 13th dude

Got some beavers that need to be put down?

Duekster
07-14-2012, 09:35 AM
I think sub surface drip is a great idea, works great for non conventional septic systems. No need to worry about watering at night either.
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I replaced about 10,000 feet of drip last winter. We were expanding the drip rings around the trees. I noticed several time feeder roots growing into the drip lines via the emitters.

I am not 100% convinced we are ready to do turf like this. However, the use of sprays has been banned in Texas if the turf is less than 4 foot (wide) and has concrete walks and drives on both sides. Time will tell.

cgaengineer
07-14-2012, 09:49 AM
The ones for septic systems are impregnated with a root herbicide and also root guards.
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Duekster
07-14-2012, 09:53 AM
The ones for septic systems are impregnated with a root herbicide and also root guards.
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The septic systems are not covered by the standard irrigation licenses in Texas and as a result I have not played with them.

Also, those herbicide inpregnated pipes would mandate an up grade to the backflow in Texas if connected to potable water.

jvanvliet
07-14-2012, 09:57 AM
So much water here, South Florida Water Management is dumping billions of gallons into the ocean... historically they do this just in advance of drought conditions.:dizzy:

1idejim
07-14-2012, 09:58 AM
Got some beavers that need to be put down?

Any excuse to eat a beaver works for me.
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Duekster
07-14-2012, 10:01 AM
This is starting to sound like Duck Dynasty.

jvanvliet
07-14-2012, 10:29 AM
Any excuse to eat a beaver works for me.
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Before I was married, beaver was only in season occasionally; now I can have it anytime I want.:D

cgaengineer
07-14-2012, 11:45 AM
The septic systems are not covered by the standard irrigation licenses in Texas and as a result I have not played with them.

Also, those herbicide inpregnated pipes would mandate an up grade to the backflow in Texas if connected to potable water.

The line should be. I'll look up the line and get you a name. I cad designed a few of these systems when I was working for my father.
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DanaMac
07-17-2012, 09:27 AM
This article from the AP came across our local paper today.
http://www.gazette.com/articles/ill-141777-nation-waltonville.html