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BCL Services
07-21-2012, 05:18 PM
Ok guys i need some suggestions for a good hedge plant that likes alot of shade. Thanks for your help.

Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 05:28 PM
None...no formal hedge is going to like full shade...what will this be planted under??? How many actual hours of shade??
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Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 05:31 PM
Another question, how big does this hedge need to get??
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Landscape Poet
07-21-2012, 05:37 PM
Ok guys i need some suggestions for a good hedge plant that likes alot of shade. Thanks for your help.


Loropetalum can tolerate decent amount of shade and give a color option even though they are in shade, you will most likely experience less blooms in the shade.

azaleas of course is a shrub that will do well in shade and of course you can get the attractive blooms.

Firebush

These are a couple that offer you color.

Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 05:44 PM
Loropetalum can tolerate decent amount of shade and give a color option even though they are in shade, you will most likely experience less blooms in the shade.

azaleas of course is a shrub that will do well in shade and of course you can get the attractive blooms.

Firebush

These are a couple that offer you color.

He said a lot of shade, which sounds like full shade....any plant that wants more sun will not thrive in full shade...
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BCL Services
07-21-2012, 05:51 PM
Thanks for the responses guys, the area only gets maybe 2 to 4 hours of partial sunlight. It is under a mature oak tree and in front of brick wall. Would like to get a chest to head high hedge line.

Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 06:02 PM
Thanks for the responses guys, the area only gets maybe 2 to 4 hours of partial sunlight. It is under a mature oak tree and in front of brick wall. Would like to get a chest to head high hedge line.

Yea, that isn't enough sun for most formal stuff. I would do lady palms. Need little maintenance and will work in the area.
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Keith
07-21-2012, 06:22 PM
I like Arborcola Trinette in the shade. Does really well near oaks. Going to be difficult to get it to be a formal hedge, but it does look good. Susceptible to cold damage though. If below 32F, they need to be covered.

easy-lift guy
07-21-2012, 09:26 PM
I would suggest either Viburnum suspension or Indian Hawthorn. Indian Hawthorn at work slightly better but just.
easy-lift guy

cgaengineer
07-21-2012, 09:30 PM
I would suggest either Viburnum suspension or Indian Hawthorn. Indian Hawthorn at work slightly better but just.
easy-lift guy

Hawthornes get really thin in shade...especially that amount of shade...they are disease prone as well.
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easy-lift guy
07-21-2012, 10:06 PM
Hawthornes get really thin in shade...especially that amount of shade...they are disease prone as well.
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Any problems with Viburnum suspension?. In spite of any disease issues which are treatable, I have used and seen Indian Hawthorn under similar growing conditions. Never lost any plant material, but I was responsible for the landscape.
easy-lift guy

cgaengineer
07-21-2012, 10:11 PM
Any problems with Viburnum suspension?. In spite of any disease issues which are treatable, I have used and seen Indian Hawthorn under similar growing conditions. Never lost any plant material, but I was responsible for the landscape.
easy-lift guy

They can be treated...but you have to continue treating them.
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easy-lift guy
07-21-2012, 10:36 PM
They can be treated...but you have to continue treating them.
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And your point is?. Considering the choices available, as long as the customer
has been informed as to what issues there may be, a care plan can be formulated and executed if need be. And of course there are also silk florials
available with no know insect or disease problems.
easy-lift guy

RussellB
07-21-2012, 10:39 PM
As much as I hate maintaining Wax Myrtles, they should do well in shade. Not a high end plant but very dense.

Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 10:48 PM
Hawthornes get really thin in shade...especially that amount of shade...they are disease prone as well.
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ya, def wouldn't plant indian hawthorne in mostly shade....

cgaengineer
07-21-2012, 10:49 PM
And your point is?. Considering the choices available, as long as the customer
has been informed as to what issues there may be, a care plan can be formulated and executed if need be. And of course there are also silk florials
available with no know insect or disease problems.
easy-lift guy

My point is hawthornes are no good, diseases prone and will be even worse in an environment not suitable for them. The require constant fungus treatments that come at a cost...

Put the correct plant in the correct location. I'm not knocking you...just suggesting another plant...which plant...idk.

http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu/News%20columns/Indian.Hawthorne.htm
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Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 10:49 PM
As much as I hate maintaining Wax Myrtles, they should do well in shade. Not a high end plant but very dense.

Don't agree with this either....i have seen some in part shade do crappy.....

Guys, there are plenty of plants that work well in shade...they just aren't going to be formal type hedge plants...

I don't like installing stuff that "might do well", or will "work ok."

Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 10:56 PM
My point is hawthornes are no good, diseases prone and will be even worse in an environment not suitable for them. The require constant fungus treatments that come at a cost...

Put the correct plant in the correct location. I'm not knocking you...just suggesting another plant...which plant...idk.

http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu/News%20columns/Indian.Hawthorne.htm
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I have always let the hawthorne's out grow the fungus....it never kills them.....remember, they are a drought tolerant plant, so I would think most fungal issues come from over-watering...

RussellB
07-21-2012, 11:08 PM
Don't agree with this either....i have seen some in part shade do crappy.....

Guys, there are plenty of plants that work well in shade...they just aren't going to be formal type hedge plants...

I don't like installing stuff that "might do well", or will "work ok."

Wax Myrtles were planted in the back of my property prior to my home being built. The area is 95percent shade and the myrtles are thriving. I trim them three times/year just to keep them in check. I agree you shouldn't install stuff that might do well. I am saying the 80ft hedge in my back yard is thriving. A fence is a true alternative to a hedge.

Florida Gardener
07-21-2012, 11:18 PM
Wax Myrtles were planted in the back of my property prior to my home being built. The area is 95percent shade and the myrtles are thriving. I trim them three times/year just to keep them in check. I agree you shouldn't install stuff that might do well. I am saying the 80ft hedge in my back yard is thriving. A fence is a true alternative to a hedge.

I've seen the opposite here...not calling you a liar....just saying what I've seen. The myrtles I saw were getting 50% shade, which sounds like a lot less than what the OP is dealing with, and they looked like hell....

bug-guy
07-22-2012, 09:09 AM
azaleas do well under oaks

agrostis
07-22-2012, 09:00 PM
Loropetalum's are the way to go. Grow's fairly quickly, grow's large, disease resistant, drought tolerant, does very well in the shade and can shaped easily.

keithslawnc
07-27-2012, 08:04 AM
Multiplex bamboo can make a great hedge in full shade. Low maintenance and can be trimmed extremely tight or let it flow a little more. Very dense privacy hedge. It will be a little thinner in the shade but still a very good hedge.

Grasssales2001
07-27-2012, 10:04 AM
Aucuba japonica. I would leave it in its natural form though.

Florida Gardener
07-27-2012, 10:23 AM
Multiplex bamboo can make a great hedge in full shade. Low maintenance and can be trimmed extremely tight or let it flow a little more. Very dense privacy hedge. It will be a little thinner in the shade but still a very good hedge.

Also creates a mess, and will compete with the oak...I still vote for raphis excelsa
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Turbo Sloth
12-11-2012, 01:47 AM
Vibernum suspensum, awabuki vibernum, cat palm, raphis palm, starburst clerodendrum and azaleas.

rob7233
12-12-2012, 12:18 AM
Also creates a mess, and will compete with the oak...I still vote for raphis excelsa
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Yeah, the Lady Palm would give you some height in some very low light conditions. For something shorter under those light conditions and without having a low pH soil to deal with would be - Philodendron "Xanudu". Some sources have even suggested Firebush but personally I haven't seen it do well in that low light setting.

The point is, if it's really deep shade, even Azaleas, Camellias & Gardenias still need more light to thrive while liking the lower soil pH typically found under Oaks. The right plant, in the right place will likely thrive and not just survive. The added stress from the shade will result in pest & disease infestations and generally poor growth. Is there any way the tree canopy can be pruned to open things up and get more light in? Also, a soil pH test is suggested.. Good Luck.