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Lawnmouse
07-30-2012, 12:12 PM
Hello Guys,

Im working on my personal Irrigation system. Im looking to fix the prom that i have. My sprinklers keep turning on after they have gone thru the cycle.

I reset the timer created new scheduled and it still does it.

Any Ideas will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

Mike Leary
07-30-2012, 12:28 PM
How are you programming the clock? Multiple programs, multiple start times, cycle and soak?

Wet_Boots
07-30-2012, 12:35 PM
Operator error - learn to program the controller, or hire someone who knows how.

jbell36
07-30-2012, 01:07 PM
what controller do you have?

KrayzKajun
07-30-2012, 01:13 PM
Operator error - learn to program the controller, or hire someone who knows how.

Bingo!!!!!
Posted via Mobile Device

bcg
07-30-2012, 04:29 PM
You only need 1 start time for a program. Delete the rest.

Mike Leary
07-30-2012, 06:50 PM
Operator error - learn to program the controller, or hire someone who knows how.

It's a little early to pile on without any questions.

greenmonster304
07-30-2012, 07:08 PM
It's a little early to pile on without any questions.

Man, that shrink must have you on some good meds. You are mellow.
Posted via Mobile Device

Mike Leary
07-30-2012, 07:16 PM
Man, that shrink must have you on some good meds. You are mellow.

:laugh: Comes with too many posts that turned sour. My shrink seems to think I've had an "epiphany", what ever the f*ck that is.

1idejim
07-30-2012, 07:59 PM
:laugh: Comes with too many posts that turned sour. My shrink seems to think I've had an "epiphany", what ever the f*ck that is.

it's kinda like a Sasquatch. everybody has heard of one but few have ever seen one.

Wet_Boots
07-30-2012, 09:08 PM
"system keeps cycling" gets cut off at the knees, and sent to the homeowner happy place

Mike Leary
07-30-2012, 09:29 PM
"system keeps cycling" gets cut off at the knees, and sent to the homeowner happy place

Unless it gets testy (which got me into the mental hospital), I have no problems helping.

Wet_Boots
07-30-2012, 09:55 PM
I'm still cranky over the thought of needless aerating

Mike Leary
07-30-2012, 10:22 PM
I'm still cranky over the thought of needless aerating

Depending on whether it's "tine" or "core", you have a point. Oblio.

Wet_Boots
07-30-2012, 11:12 PM
some of the soil was so heavy you had to fix it before a good lawn could go in, but no one bothered, so nothing thereafter worked 'by the book' and aerating of any sort was ineffective.

AI Inc
07-31-2012, 06:36 AM
it's kinda like a Sasquatch. everybody has heard of one but few have ever seen one.

I thought sasquatch has taken Mikes picture.

jbell36
07-31-2012, 07:17 PM
some of the soil was so heavy you had to fix it before a good lawn could go in, but no one bothered, so nothing thereafter worked 'by the book' and aerating of any sort was ineffective.

boots, what about aerating and top dressing with top soil or compost? in a bad soil type situation, this is a solution...compact soils need aeration, especially during seeding, it makes a great seed bed, and i'm not talking about the holes necessarily, i'm talking about the core on top that breaks down...i don't see how you are so against aerating, there are many situations where aeration is needed...

Mike Leary
07-31-2012, 07:46 PM
I just noticed the OP never responded. :dizzy:

greenmonster304
07-31-2012, 07:54 PM
boots, what about aerating and top dressing with top soil or compost? in a bad soil type situation, this is a solution...compact soils need aeration, especially during seeding, it makes a great seed bed, and i'm not talking about the holes necessarily, i'm talking about the core on top that breaks down...i don't see how you are so against aerating, there are many situations where aeration is needed...

I think boots is talking about sites that have construction related deep compaction issues or just plain heavy hard soil where a 4" core aeration has little effect.

I have a few sites that have construction compaction that is 2' deep. You can aerate until the cows come home but it doesn't help.

Wet_Boots
07-31-2012, 08:10 PM
Even without compaction from construction, some sites would need deep tilling like you'd give a farm field, and even if you brought in and worked improvements into the soil, to make a perfect bed for lawn and garden, it would be like a lake, because it would never drain into the native soil surrounding it.

Mike Leary
07-31-2012, 08:39 PM
Even without compaction from construction, some sites would need deep tilling like you'd give a farm field, and even if you brought in and worked improvements into the soil, to make a perfect bed for lawn and garden, it would be like a lake, because it would never drain into the native soil surrounding it.

So,what do we do, pave it? :rolleyes: How about some suggestions rather than pontification that leads nowhere. as usual.

muddywater
07-31-2012, 08:56 PM
Even without compaction from construction, some sites would need deep tilling like you'd give a farm field, and even if you brought in and worked improvements into the soil, to make a perfect bed for lawn and garden, it would be like a lake, because it would never drain into the native soil surrounding it.

Yeah I have noticed how well grass grows in trench lines. You almost need to harrow a compact lawn, of course nobody wants to pay for that.

Also, it is weird how in the moonlight you can see trench lines much better than in the day light.

Kiril
08-01-2012, 11:22 AM
jbell,

Ignore boots. There are valid reasons to areate a soil, relieving compaction is not the only one.

Wet_Boots
08-01-2012, 11:46 AM
valid as in "give me money" payup

Mike Leary
08-01-2012, 12:25 PM
Back in the day, aeration was common practice, adding sand to improve drainage, topsoil and mulch to improve health, etc. It fell out of favor, I suppose because of the cost. The "tine" method was worthless, as it compacted the sides of the hole. "Core" worked well, but too many pikers left the cores on the ground because they were too lazy to remove them.

Wet_Boots
08-01-2012, 01:08 PM
core aeration on golf greens works, since they fill in with sand

I've rototilled amendments into the adobe clay soils in Socal tract developments - much better root development, but it needed drainage added, so water wouldn't pool up in the more-porous soil.

irrig8r
08-01-2012, 08:43 PM
How did this thread make a left turn from the sublject of bad controller programming to the benefits of aeration? :confused:

Mike Leary
08-01-2012, 08:51 PM
How did this thread make a left turn from the sublject of bad controller programming to the benefits of aeration? :confused:

Boots...........:hammerhead:

Wet_Boots
08-01-2012, 09:15 PM
I didn't feel like typing RTFM

AI Inc
08-02-2012, 07:08 AM
Back in the day, aeration was common practice, adding sand to improve drainage, topsoil and mulch to improve health, etc. It fell out of favor, I suppose because of the cost. The "tine" method was worthless, as it compacted the sides of the hole. "Core" worked well, but too many pikers left the cores on the ground because they were too lazy to remove them.

There is no need to remove them as they will break down within a week.

Mike Leary
08-02-2012, 04:36 PM
There is no need to remove them as they will break down within a week.

And continue the the process of compaction. :rolleyes:

irritation
08-02-2012, 05:18 PM
There is no need to remove them as they will break down within a week.

Common practice around here, they claim it's good for the lawn. I agree it's usually a waste of money.

Mike Leary
08-02-2012, 05:27 PM
Like thatching, aeration is pissing in the wind unless soil amendments are added. I've sure got hammered (payup) when someone forgot to have us flag the heads.