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soafone
08-04-2012, 12:32 AM
I have a one inch water main in a residential home, going into a 5/8 water meter, then back out to one inch pex pipe. Right after that, if I were to install a 1/2" boiler drain (aka. sediment tap) off of the pex pipe, and I was to attach a Toro flow gauge, how accurate with the gpm reading be? Would the reading be an excellent figure to base my zones on as far as flow (gpm's) is concerned? How many gpm's could I expect it to be? I have attached a pressure gauge at the hose bib at the back of the home and it reads 55 psi.

I suspect that the Toro flow gauge would not accurately measure the gpm's since I am connecting to a 1/2" boiler drain, not directly to the one inch pipe. The hole inside it the boiler drain is pretty small and very restrictive of volume. What do you think?

irritation
08-04-2012, 12:38 AM
Yeah, not very accurate. I never thought much of those Toro flow gauges either, we used them back in the early 80's.

Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 06:53 AM
It is a vague generality, that in a home with a basement water meter, the flow and pressure you read at a hose bib located not too far from the meter, will be what the system will have available, on account of the losses in the pathway through the hose bib being more or less what will be lost through a PVB and an electric valve.

cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 07:07 AM
You will likely exceed the 15gpm the gauge reads if you installed at that location.
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Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 07:45 AM
You will likely exceed the 15gpm the gauge reads if you installed at that location.
Posted via Mobile DeviceThrough a hose bib? 15 gpm? Not likely.

cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 10:51 AM
Through a hose bib? 15 gpm? Not likely.

No, right after the meter is what he said...
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Mike Leary
08-04-2012, 12:09 PM
Yeah, not very accurate. I never thought much of those Toro flow gauges either, we used them back in the early 80's.

I agree, I thought I was becoming a real "tech" when I bought one, until I noticed the warning that said "do not exceed 30 pounds pressure." :dizzy:

Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 12:13 PM
I agree, I thought I was becoming a real "tech" when I bought one, until I noticed the warning that said "do not exceed 30 pounds pressure." :dizzy:that's because the flow gauge is really a 30 psi pressure gauge with a special scale that's keyed to the size of the outlet

Mike Leary
08-04-2012, 12:25 PM
I think that Toro gauge banged around the service truck for a couple of years until I chucked it. We'd already bought a couple of these, which worked swell.

www.betterwaterind.com/flowmeter.html

cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 12:27 PM
I agree, I thought I was becoming a real "tech" when I bought one, until I noticed the warning that said "do not exceed 30 pounds pressure." :dizzy:

If you dont exceed it's ratings the gauge is accurate according to a bucket test.

Now these are very accurate. I have one and have used it many times.

http://www.pollardwater.com/pages_product/P67514LFdiffuser.asp
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Mike Leary
08-04-2012, 12:42 PM
If you dont exceed it's ratings the gauge is accurate according to a bucket test.

Now these are very accurate. I have one and have used it many times.

http://www.pollardwater.com/pages_product/P67514LFdiffuser.asp


Wow! That's a no b.s. tester, except I have no fire hydrants on any of my sites. :cry:

cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 01:05 PM
Wow! That's a no b.s. tester, except I have no fire hydrants on any of my sites. :cry:

I did many hydrant flow tests at the company I used to work for. These tests were for fire protection and new subdivisions mostly. You haven't seen flow until you see 4000 gallons per minute coming out of a 2.5" hydrant bib at almost 200 psi. A ground shaking experience.
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Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 01:52 PM
I use hydrant adapters to get a street pressure measurement when a home has a PRV. Most all hydrants have the 2.5 inch NST threads, but recently, I found some that had 2.5 inch NPSH threads.

cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 01:55 PM
I use hydrant adapters to get a street pressure measurement when a home has a PRV. Most all hydrants have the 2.5 inch NST threads, but recently, I found some that had 2.5 inch NPSH threads.

I have both versions of hose adapters but have found that the flow gauge fit on every hydrant around here.
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1idejim
08-04-2012, 01:59 PM
I did many hydrant flow tests at the company I used to work for. These tests were for fire protection and new subdivisions mostly. You haven't seen flow until you see 4000 gallons per minute coming out of a 2.5" hydrant bib at almost 200 psi. A ground shaking experience.
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my pollardwater catalog #172 only has 160psi/2120gpm max gauges rated for 2.5 inch. Got a link to the 200/4000?
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cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 02:02 PM
my pollardwater catalog #172 only has 160psi/2120gpm max gauges rated for 2.5 inch. Got a link to the 200/4000?
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I had to swap the gauge. It broke the stock one. It's just a piezo tube with a standard size orrifice. Those pressures were on a hydrant I tested.
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1idejim
08-04-2012, 02:25 PM
I had to swap the gauge. It broke the stock one. It's just a piezo tube with a standard size orrifice. Those pressures were on a hydrant I tested.
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if you could post the link to the pressure/flow gauge i would be greatful. dual read gauges for the pressure/flow range you stated are tough to find. thanks
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Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 02:25 PM
I have both versions of hose adapters but have found that the flow gauge fit on every hydrant around here.
Posted via Mobile DeviceYou have a single hydrant-to-garden-hose adapter for the NPSH threads?

1idejim
08-04-2012, 02:30 PM
You have a single hydrant-to-garden-hose adapter for the NPSH threads?

i have one boots, posted pics of it 3 years ago.
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Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 02:44 PM
I would tend to believe it was of the slightly larger NST threads - plenty of garden-hose adapters for them - the NPSH threads are about a quarter-inch smaller in diameter, and I don't see a a garden-hose adapter for NPSH hydrants

1idejim
08-04-2012, 03:00 PM
I would tend to believe it was of the slightly larger NST threads - plenty of garden-hose adapters for them - the NPSH threads are about a quarter-inch smaller in diameter, and I don't see a a garden-hose adapter for NPSH hydrants

i stand corrected. i have the NST and an adapter from NPSH to NST, can't tell you where i got it but i can tell you whose house it is at.
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Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 03:18 PM
i stand corrected. i have the NST and an adapter from NPSH to NST, can't tell you where i got it but i can tell you whose house it is at.
Posted via Mobile DeviceOooh, thanks for the idea of the hydrant-to-hydrant adapter. I've been looking strictly for a hydrant to NPT adapter, and they aren't a bargain.

cgaengineer
08-04-2012, 03:44 PM
Pollard water is a great company...really good customer service.
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1idejim
08-04-2012, 04:47 PM
Oooh, thanks for the idea of the hydrant-to-hydrant adapter. I've been looking strictly for a hydrant to NPT adapter, and they aren't a bargain.
here's the link smartass
http://www.NPSH/adapters/fittings/ (http://badgerbadgerbadger.com/)

Wet_Boots
08-04-2012, 05:36 PM
oh, pshaw - you didn't even include a dot-com in there

1idejim
08-04-2012, 05:44 PM
oh, pshaw - you didn't even include a dot-com in there

you got me:rolleyes:guess that it takes a pro to snake a pro:hammerhead: