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reliablelawn
08-12-2012, 11:02 AM
How should one apply roundup when spraying weeds in a flower bed? Do you targer the soil where the root is going into the ground or spray the leaves? Both? Do you normally do one spray per weed or a few to get it soaked? Any advice would be much appreciated.

THanks.

BROWNS LAWN CARE
08-12-2012, 11:23 AM
all i've ever done is spot spray the leaves, not really soaking them. roundup will kill a lot of stuff that way.

be careful the over spray will kill too...

maybe some others have a better method, but this has always worked for me.

Larry Overcash
08-12-2012, 11:47 AM
all i've ever done is spot spray the leaves, not really soaking them. roundup will kill a lot of stuff that way.

be careful the over spray will kill too...

maybe some others have a better method, but this has always worked for me.

X2 This is exactly the method I use. I don't see any other way to do it and not get it on plants. If there is a better way, I certainly would love to hear about it myself.

Big Bad Bob
08-12-2012, 01:30 PM
If you don't know the answer, I have a question. Are you even licensed for pesticide application? How could anyone be licensed and not know this?

Larry Overcash
08-12-2012, 01:57 PM
If you don't know the answer, I have a question. Are you even licensed for pesticide application? How could anyone be licensed and not know this?

Can't speak for anyone else, I come here to learn from professionals. It seems like every time someone has an honest question, the first answer is often answered with a question. Just answer what is asked and move on or don't say anything. Not everyone here has chemical license and you can buy Round-up anywhere.

93Chevy
08-12-2012, 02:19 PM
Round up is a non-selective systemic herbicide.

Non-selective means it kill everything. Not really, to be honest, but it kill enough that you have be VERY careful with overspray and winddrift.

Systemic means it works from the leaves down to the root. It has no soil activity, and only works when applied to foliage.

And no, I don't have my license. I gained all my knowledge reading labels when I worked at a feed/co-op store through high school and college.

CLARK LAWN
08-12-2012, 02:22 PM
It doesn't matter that you can buy it everywhere. By law you must have a pesticide license to use in on anyones property but your own.
You can tell from the question that he doesn't have a clue so he should not be using it on someone else's property. Chances are if he is not licensed then he is not insured for pesticide use either. What is he going to do when he applies it the wrong way and kills 10k in landscaping?
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White Gardens
08-12-2012, 02:27 PM
It doesn't matter that you can buy it everywhere. By law you must have a pesticide license to use in on anyones property but your own.
You can tell from the question that he doesn't have a clue so he should not be using it on someone else's property. Chances are if he is not licensed then he is not insured for pesticide use either. What is he going to do when he applies it the wrong way and kills 10k in landscaping?
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Exactly....

Rules are Rules, and Laws are Laws. You just can't pick and choose which laws you want to break just because you don't agree with them.


......

Big Bad Bob
08-12-2012, 02:44 PM
Exactly....

Rules are Rules, and Laws are Laws. You just can't pick and choose which laws you want to break just because you don't agree with them.


......

All I want to know is, what makes some of these people so special that they apply chemicals without a license or insurance and the rest of us have to be licensed and insured? If you can't be bothered with license rules, you shouldn't be in the business.

Big Bad Bob
08-12-2012, 03:06 PM
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I guess you think that has anything to do with this thread.
EVERYBODY has to follow the law and to not do so, you are scamming your customers as well as breaking the law. You want to be considered a professional but you are unwilling to take the steps it takes to be a professional. That's just not fair to your customers or the rest of us who follow the rules.
:hammerhead:

Ric
08-12-2012, 03:53 PM
Round up is a non-selective systemic herbicide.

Non-selective means it kill everything. Not really, to be honest, but it kill enough that you have be VERY careful with overspray and winddrift.

Systemic means it works from the leaves down to the root. It has no soil activity, and only works when applied to foliage.

And no, I don't have my license. I gained all my knowledge reading labels when I worked at a feed/co-op store through high school and college.

Glyphosate which is the Active ingredient of ROUNDUP IS NOT A NON SELECT HERBICIDE.

Depending on how it is mixed and applied Roundup can be a GROWTH REGULATOR, a SELECT HERBICIDE or a NON SELECT HERBICIDE. I suggest you read and study the Label of Any Herbicide you use it or talk about it.


.

charmill26
08-12-2012, 03:58 PM
Just apply a nice blanket over the entire bed so you make sure to get those weeds

BROWNS LAWN CARE
08-12-2012, 04:03 PM
Just apply a nice blanket over the entire bed so you make sure to get those weeds

a sarcasm emoticon is needed so someone doesn't take you serious...

Big Bad Bob
08-12-2012, 04:31 PM
a sarcasm emoticon is needed so someone doesn't take you serious...

Who says he's not serious?
:usflag:

BROWNS LAWN CARE
08-12-2012, 04:48 PM
Who says he's not serious?
:usflag:

:laugh:, well ok, that will definitely control the weeds Thumbs Up










and the flowers :cry:

BPS##
08-12-2012, 05:32 PM
If you don't know the answer, I have a question. Are you even licensed for pesticide application? How could anyone be licensed and not know this?




It took until the 4th post for this to be asked.

I read the thread start and thought "this guy is about to get roasted alive."

clydebusa
08-12-2012, 05:35 PM
Yelp roasted by a bunch of guys who break the rules and laws everday. Everyone of you do. Even me and I am perfect.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 05:40 PM
Can't speak for anyone else, I come here to learn from professionals. It seems like every time someone has an honest question, the first answer is often answered with a question. Just answer what is asked and move on or don't say anything. Not everyone here has chemical license and you can buy Round-up anywhere.

You can buy it anywhere...but when you apply it at a customers house you are breaking the law. And if you don't know how to apply it or how it works...you didn't read the label...again, you are breaking the law.
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cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 05:45 PM
Yelp roasted by a bunch of guys who break the rules and laws everday. Everyone of you do. Even me and I am perfect.

I speed to my customers property in my chemical truck. ;)
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cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 05:46 PM
How should one apply roundup when spraying weeds in a flower bed? Do you targer the soil where the root is going into the ground or spray the leaves? Both? Do you normally do one spray per weed or a few to get it soaked? Any advice would be much appreciated.

THanks.

Read the label...
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cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 06:02 PM
Btw....I can buy beer anywhere, but if I give it to your 13 year old son I'm breaking the law.
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White Gardens
08-12-2012, 06:28 PM
Yelp roasted by a bunch of guys who break the rules and laws everday. Everyone of you do. Even me and I am perfect.

Yep, more than likely, but lets look at it this way.

There is trying to do right and the right things and accidentally breaking the law, or there's the guys who don't give a rat's behind just because they don't agree with a law, and don't even try to abide by them.

....

pythons37
08-12-2012, 06:31 PM
I was going to use it on my yard. That's legal, isn't it?

All my customers get referred to a company who has all the tools and papers to spray and broadcast whatever anyone needs. I cut the grass. That's it. General Liability is what I carry. And everyone signs off on a waiver that if I wreck something they left in the yard, too bad. And I might charge you for busting up my equipment. Also, I walk around and look for any problems before I cut. If no one wants to agree, I don't do the job. Some of the best jobs are the ones you don't do.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 06:35 PM
I was going to use it on my yard. That's legal, isn't it?

All my customers get referred to a company who has all the tools and papers to spray and broadcast whatever anyone needs. I cut the grass. That's it. General Liability is what I carry. And everyone signs off on a waiver that if I wreck something they left in the yard, too bad. And I might charge you for busting up my equipment. Also, I walk around and look for any problems before I cut. If no one wants to agree, I don't do the job. Some of the best jobs are the ones you don't do.

You are still obligated to read the label...homeowner or profession, the label is still the law.

And if you don't know how the chemical works you may want to use the chemical company you use for your customers on your own lawn or risk damaging your property.

Do you also go as reliablelawn as the OP in this thread?
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reliablelawn
08-12-2012, 07:11 PM
Thank you to those who posted helpful comments.

ChuckPMi
08-12-2012, 08:39 PM
<<GROWTH REGULATOR, a SELECT HERBICIDE or a NON SELECT HERBICIDE>>
Glyphosate can be selective in the sense that some plants require a higher concentration than others and "Roundup Ready" crops are not affected by concentrations that kill most weeds. It is NOT a growth regulator. It is an amino acid inhibitor (aromatic). http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-23-W.html It can kill the plant by diffusing into the leaves, being squirted into holes you drill in the trunk, by getting applied to a cut stump, or by being soaked up by the roots if you spray too much of it. This is why the directions say to spray to the point of wet but not runoff.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 08:49 PM
<<GROWTH REGULATOR, a SELECT HERBICIDE or a NON SELECT HERBICIDE>>
Glyphosate can be selective in the sense that some plants require a higher concentration than others and "Roundup Ready" crops are not affected by concentrations that kill most weeds. It is NOT a growth regulator. It is an amino acid inhibitor (aromatic). http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-23-W.html It can kill the plant by diffusing into the leaves, being squirted into holes you drill in the trunk, by getting applied to a cut stump, or by being soaked up by the roots if you spray too much of it. This is why the directions say to spray to the point of wet but not runoff.

I was originally developed as a growth reg...and it's used as a growth reg and it's in the label for growth reg.

Dont spray to run off because it's a waste.
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ChuckPMi
08-12-2012, 09:16 PM
<< it's in the label for growth reg.>>
Here is a Roundup label http://www.fumigationzone.com/MSDS/roundup%20label.pdf. At the bottom of the left column on page 2 it say, "Mode of Action: The active ingredient in this product inhibits an enzyme found only in plants and microorganisms that is essential to formation of specific amino acids."

Please refer us to a link that shows a label that says it is a growth regulator.

I agree that spraying to runoff is a waste and that is the best reason not to do iot.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 09:24 PM
Section 13.3 chemical mowing.

http://www.cdms.net/LDat/ld8CC045.pdf
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Big Bad Bob
08-12-2012, 09:27 PM
You are still obligated to read the label...homeowner or profession, the label is still the law.

And if you don't know how the chemical works you may want to use the chemical company you use for your customers on your own lawn or risk damaging your property.

Do you also go as reliablelawn as the OP in this thread?
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That's right. Even if you use it on your own property and you don't use as directed and it damages your neighbor's property, you could still have legal problems from being willfully ignorant.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 09:28 PM
http://www.lawnsite.com/archive/index.php/t-102493.html
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cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 09:34 PM
And about your theory on root uptake from soil...busted.

Look on page 8

http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/glyphotech.pdf
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You can spray a weed/grass lawn today and plant sod or seed tomorrow...provided the sod did not contact the leaf surface with roundup on it.

Ric
08-12-2012, 09:46 PM
<<GROWTH REGULATOR, a SELECT HERBICIDE or a NON SELECT HERBICIDE>>
Glyphosate can be selective in the sense that some plants require a higher concentration than others and "Roundup Ready" crops are not affected by concentrations that kill most weeds. It is NOT a growth regulator. It is an amino acid inhibitor (aromatic). http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-23-W.html It can kill the plant by diffusing into the leaves, being squirted into holes you drill in the trunk, by getting applied to a cut stump, or by being soaked up by the roots if you spray too much of it. This is why the directions say to spray to the point of wet but not runoff.

Sorry Chuck but you are wrong on all accounts. Growth Regulator are classified as Herbicide because the alter the Growth of the Plant. Some do so by effecting DNA and redirecting growth. PRIMO is an example of a Growth Regular that redirects Growth.

The other form of Growth Regulator controls grow by slowing Metabolism. Glyphosate slows Metabolism by reducing Photosyntheses and reducing energy for growth.

In 1969 Dr John Franz PhD while working for Monsanto (google him he is in the inventors hall of fame along with Walt Disney for inventing Mickey Mouse.) was trying to develop a cheap Growth Regulator. He developed Glyphosate and while running field trails discovered by pure accident that Glyphosate was an excellent Herbicide at higher rates. Monsanto Named it Roundup and it became the Most financially successful Pesticide every marketed.

If you had taken the time to read the Label and paid attention to Section 8.3 Chemical Mowing (Chemical Mowing is applying a PGR to reduce mowing frequent) or Section 8.11 actively growing Bermuda/Bahia you wouldn't of made the above post.

http://www.cdms.net/LDat/ld5EH017.pdf


.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 09:52 PM
Sorry Chuck but you are wrong on all accounts. Growth Regulator are classified as Herbicide because the alter the Growth of the Plant. Some do so by effecting DNA and redirecting growth. PRIMO is an example of a Growth Regular that redirects Growth.

The other form of Growth Regulator controls grow by slowing Metabolism. Glyphosate slows Metabolism by reducing Photosyntheses and reducing energy for growth.

In 1969 Dr John Franz PhD while working for Monsanto (google him he is in the inventors hall of fame along with Walt Disney for inventing Mickey Mouse.) was trying to develop a cheap Growth Regulator. He developed Glyphosate and while running field trails discovered by pure accident that Glyphosate was an excellent Herbicide at higher rates. Monsanto Named it Roundup and it became the Most financially successful Pesticide every marketed.

If you had taken the time to read the Label and paid attention to Section 8.3 Chemical Mowing (Chemical Mowing is applying a PGR to reduce mowing frequent) or Section 8.11 actively growing Bermuda/Bahia you wouldn't of made the above post.

http://www.cdms.net/LDat/ld5EH017.pdf


.

Ouch...

Or 13.3 on the label I provided...thanks Ric for the extra info.

I too use RU as a growth reg...I spray the banks on the properties I maintain that are too steep to mow. I do t want total destruction, I just want to limit the growth. The plus to this is at low rates it usually kills broadleafs while keeping the desirable grass.
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ChuckPMi
08-12-2012, 09:52 PM
<<Section 13.3 chemical mowing.>>
That section does not call it a growth regulator. I don't know what your definition of growth regulator is but it seems to vary from that of the herbicide manufacturer.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 09:53 PM
<<Section 13.3 chemical mowing.>>
That section does not call it a growth regulator. I don't know what your definition of growth regulator is but it seems to vary from that of the herbicide manufacturer.

What is chemical mowing chuck? Do we really have to split hairs? Read Ric's reply.
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Ric
08-12-2012, 09:59 PM
<<Section 13.3 chemical mowing.>>
That section does not call it a growth regulator. I don't know what your definition of growth regulator is but it seems to vary from that of the herbicide manufacturer.

Chuck If you had had a actual education in Pesticides then you would Know two facts you seem to be missing. First GROWTH REGULATOR ARE CLASSIFIED AS A HERBICIDE and CHEMICAL MOWING IS THE APPLICATION OF A GROWTH REGULATOR.

OK I am done with this thread. I believe I would do better talking to a refrigerator, At least when I open the door a light comes on.

.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:02 PM
Chuck If you had had a actual education in Pesticides then you would Know two facts you seem to be missing. First GROWTH REGULATOR ARE CLASSIFIED AS A HERBICIDE and CHEMICAL MOWING IS THE APPLICATION OF A GROWTH REGULATOR.

OK I am done with this thread. I believe I would do better talking to a refrigerator, At least when I open the door a light comes on.

.

His bulb might be burned out!

The thing is ric, he is going to secretly use RU as a growth regulator and come back to this thread and thank us.
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cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:06 PM
If chemical mowing is not using a product to control growth than what is it doing?
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greendoctor
08-12-2012, 10:09 PM
The other way to do chemical mowing is much more dramatic. Imagine applying enough paraquat or diquat to top kill the grass, but allowing it to grow back. That is the other degree of chemical mowing that is done in orchards or vinyards.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:12 PM
The other way to do chemical mowing is much more dramatic. Imagine applying enough paraquat or diquat to top kill the grass, but allowing it to grow back. That is the other degree of chemical mowing that is done in orchards or vinyards.

That's a pretty cool use for a herbicide...not sure how useful it would be in my line of business.
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greendoctor
08-12-2012, 10:14 PM
It is only for ag applications or specialized VM. There are situations where I do not want to kill grass or vegetation down to the roots because of the soil erosion that would cause, yet the vegetation must be reduced. That is what diquat is good for.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:22 PM
It is only for ag applications or specialized VM. There are situations where I do not want to kill grass or vegetation down to the roots because of the soil erosion that would cause, yet the vegetation must be reduced. That is what diquat is good for.

Detention ponds would be a great candidate for this type of control.
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greendoctor
08-12-2012, 10:25 PM
Diquat is also labeled for usage directly into lakes and ditches. It is an aquatic herbicide. What I get is labeled "Reward Landscape and Aquatic Herbicide". Be careful with this stuff, chitwillkillya.

ChuckPMi
08-12-2012, 10:27 PM
<<Depending on how it is mixed and applied Roundup can be a GROWTH REGULATOR, a SELECT HERBICIDE or a NON SELECT HERBICIDE. I suggest you read and study the Label of Any Herbicide you use it or talk about it.>>
I read and studied the label and the label says it is non-selective and does not say it is a growth regulator. As I said, your personal definition seems to differ from the manufacturer of the herbicide and from the chemical industry.

Soil action from glyphosate may be rare and I believe you on sod and seeding but I have seen large spicebushes die as a result of spraying garlic mustard or buckthorn seedlings underneath them. I suspect that spicebush is especially sensitive to glyphosate. Just because it doesn't bother sod doesn't mean that it doesn't bother anything. Here is a study that says some glyphosate can be taken up by the roots http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/emon/pubs/fatememo/glyphos.pdf. This is a general finding and based on your experience, is irrelevant for sod or seeding. I have never seen anything but spicebush affected by it and didn't believe it at first based on generally accepted knowledge but have seen it enough times that I am convinced that it was the glyphosate. The paper says it doesn't affect seeds because it is not a preemergent due largely to strong adsorbtion to soil particles.

This may be splitting hairs except if you are trying to prevent development of herbicide resistance. To prevent development of resistance you should use herbicides with different modes of action. If you say that everything is a growth regulator then there is no way to determine what alternative herbicides to use. For most of us this is a moot point because we aren't worried about development of resistance.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:27 PM
Diquat is also labeled for usage directly into lakes and ditches. It is an aquatic herbicide. What I get is labeled "Reward Landscape and Aquatic Herbicide". Be careful with this stuff, chitwillkillya.

I'll peek at the label in a bit...
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cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:30 PM
<<Depending on how it is mixed and applied Roundup can be a GROWTH REGULATOR, a SELECT HERBICIDE or a NON SELECT HERBICIDE. I suggest you read and study the Label of Any Herbicide you use it or talk about it.>>
I read and studied the label and the label says it is non-selective and does not say it is a growth regulator. As I said, your personal definition seems to differ from the manufacturer of the herbicide and from the chemical industry.

Soil action from glyphosate may be rare and I believe you on sod and seeding but I have seen large spicebushes die as a result of spraying garlic mustard or buckthorn seedlings underneath them. I suspect that spicebush is especially sensitive to glyphosate. Just because it doesn't bother sod doesn't mean that it doesn't bother anything. Here is a study that says some glyphosate can be taken up by the roots http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/emon/pubs/fatememo/glyphos.pdf. This is a general finding and based on your experience, is irrelevant for sod or seeding. I have never seen anything but spicebush affected by it and didn't believe it at first based on generally accepted knowledge but have seen it enough times that I am convinced that it was the glyphosate. The paper says it doesn't affect seeds because it is not a preemergent due largely to strong adsorbtion to soil particles.

This may be splitting hairs except if you are trying to prevent development of herbicide resistance. To prevent development of resistance you should use herbicides with different modes of action. If you say that everything is a growth regulator then there is no way to determine what alternative herbicides to use. For most of us this is a moot point because we aren't worried about development of resistance.

It may not say "growth regulator" but what is chemical mowing?
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greendoctor
08-12-2012, 10:31 PM
Look at the MSDS for the product. Know what it can do. Otherwise, it is one of my most frequently applied non selective herbicides, preferred over RoundUp. Especially near desirable ornamentals. I have the bad fortune of having weeds that are not highly susceptible to RoundUp, but ornamentals that will die if small amounts go in their direction.

ChuckPMi
08-12-2012, 10:34 PM
Diquat can be used for chemical mowing but its mode of action is "cell membrane destroyer." http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-23-W.html. Just because an herbicide doesn't totally kill a plant doesn't mean that its mode of action is growth regulator. 2, 4-D, dicamba, and Garlon (triclopyr) are examples of growth regulators.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:36 PM
Diquat can be used for chemical mowing but its mode of action is "cell membrane destroyer." http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-23-W.html. Just because an herbicide doesn't totally kill a plant doesn't mean that its mode of action is growth regulator. 2, 4-D, dicamba, and Garlon (triclopyr) are examples of growth regulators.

Ok Chuck, we can agree to disagree.
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greendoctor
08-12-2012, 10:37 PM
How true. Traces of 2,4-D or Triclopyr are used as growth regulators or auxin mimics in tissue culture. That saying "the dose makes the poison" is true in this case.

ChuckPMi
08-12-2012, 10:41 PM
<<It may not say "growth regulator" but what is chemical mowing?>>
We could call that growth regulation and if you totally kill the plant, we could call that growth regulation since it has totally stopped growth and you could call water a growth regulator since more water makes grass grow faster. It is not the herbicide industry or the Purdue University definition of "mode of action" and it probably doesn't matter unless you are concerned with herbicide resistance or it is on your herbicide licensing exam. The Michigan herbicide applicator core manual does not have any information on which herbicides have which mode of action.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 10:50 PM
<<It may not say "growth regulator" but what is chemical mowing?>>
We could call that growth regulation and if you totally kill the plant, we could call that growth regulation since it has totally stopped growth and you could call water a growth regulator since more water makes grass grow faster. It is not the herbicide industry or the Purdue University definition of "mode of action" and it probably doesn't matter unless you are concerned with herbicide resistance or it is on your herbicide licensing exam. The Michigan herbicide applicator core manual does not have any information on which herbicides have which mode of action.

If chemical mowing keeps you from physically mowing the grass with a mower it has regulated the growth of the grass. Thus it would be considered a growth regulator.
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Ric
08-12-2012, 11:10 PM
The other way to do chemical mowing is much more dramatic. Imagine applying enough paraquat or diquat to top kill the grass, but allowing it to grow back. That is the other degree of chemical mowing that is done in orchards or vinyards.

Florida Citrus farmer are using two Boom Two Tank system in the groves. Citrus likes bare ground due to Oxygen demand by the roots. Therefore one pass with killing strength Glyphosate is used under the tree's drip line and Chemical Mowing rate is used between the Trees. With 55 inches of rain per year erosion is a concern. Citrus can take a certain amount of Glyphosate without causing stress. Young Trees are susceptible Glyphosate if sprayed to Heavy.

An other Diquat method of Chemical mowing is a DRAG. This can be made many different ways. I like the Thick wall 3" PVC pipe as a reservoir. Rope wicks are attached in holes in the pipe. As this is drug across the turf only the tops of the grass are burned down. This has a big advantage because it uses very little product and only burns the tops of the Grass. Once again we need erosion control because of our Rainy season. The Drag can also be made adjustable to a certain height just like a mower.

Of course it should be obvious to any Individual with normal mentality that Roundup as a PGR is best used on Utility Turf and Not fine turf.

.

Florida Gardener
08-12-2012, 11:14 PM
Florida Citrus farmer are using two Boom Two Tank system in the groves. Citrus likes bare ground due to Oxygen demand by the roots. Therefore one pass with killing strength Glyphosate is used under the tree's drip line and Chemical Mowing rate is used between the Trees. With 55 inches of rain per year erosion is a concern. Citrus can take a certain amount of Glyphosate without causing stress. Young Trees are susceptible Glyphosate if sprayed to Heavy.

An other Diquat method of Chemical mowing is a DRAG. This can be made many different ways. I like the Thick wall 3" PVC pipe as a reservoir. Rope wicks are attached in holes in the pipe. As this is drug across the turf only the tops of the grass are burned down. This has a big advantage because it uses very little product and only burns the tops of the Grass. Once again we need erosion control because of our Rainy season. The Drag can also be made adjustable to a certain height just like a mower.

Of course it should be obvious to any Individual with normal mentality that Roundup as a PGR is best used on Utility Turf and Not fine turf.

.

Ric, when you used PGRs on St. Augustine, would it choke out weeds, mainly CG?
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greendoctor
08-12-2012, 11:25 PM
Sadly, in my state, there is lots of vegetation that is mowed or string trimmed when it should be sprayed.

Ric
08-12-2012, 11:40 PM
Ric, when you used PGRs on St. Augustine, would it choke out weeds, mainly CG?
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Because you aren't licensed, you wouldn't apply a PGR to turf. RIGHT.??? In fact every time you ask a question about spraying chemicals it is only for your own yard. RIGHT.

St Augustine is real sensitive to any Herbicide and PGR's are Herbicide. Primo I have found Redirect Growth and helps grow in niches or bald spots. Plug Jobs can also grow in quicker by using PGR like Primo the Redirect growth laterally instead of vertical.

Crab Grass is an annual and as such grows faster than Perennials. Therefore Crab Grass out competes St A. Primo rate is 4.5 to 6 oz per acre. I am not sure how much Crab Grass needs to regulate it's growth but it is a lot more and would kill St A.

PS. PGR only last so long, Then the plant has a Spring Back effect and grows extra fast as the PGR wears off.

.

Florida Gardener
08-13-2012, 08:14 AM
Because you aren't licensed, you wouldn't apply a PGR to turf. RIGHT.??? In fact every time you ask a question about spraying chemicals it is only for your own yard. RIGHT.

St Augustine is real sensitive to any Herbicide and PGR's are Herbicide. Primo I have found Redirect Growth and helps grow in niches or bald spots. Plug Jobs can also grow in quicker by using PGR like Primo the Redirect growth laterally instead of vertical.

Crab Grass is an annual and as such grows faster than Perennials. Therefore Crab Grass out competes St A. Primo rate is 4.5 to 6 oz per acre. I am not sure how much Crab Grass needs to regulate it's growth but it is a lot more and would kill St A.

PS. PGR only last so long, Then the plant has a Spring Back effect and grows extra fast as the PGR wears off.

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You got it! I'm not even doing it on my own yard, just was curious cause I remember you mentioned before that you have used primo to redirect growth on st Augustine. That is one of the biggest downfalls to st Augustine IMO...very slow recovery rate. I've had yards that were fertilized and irrigated properly, as well as cut high enough that would still have weed outbreaks. CG would rear its head in certain areas and slowly take the area over. It seems that at some point on a st Augustine lawn, a re-sod is necessary in certain areas. Everytime I take care of my zoysia lawns, the more I love them... But yes, I am not applying pesticides...
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pythons37
08-13-2012, 02:05 PM
I'm going to keep doing what I've been doing:pull it out. Too many cool wild critters walking around. Don't want to bother them. I swear some the turkeys around here are 4 feet tall.