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BLC1
08-21-2012, 11:44 AM
I'm not sure what is going on here. This started a couple months ago and I was thinking it might back after the drought finally broke. I was pulling on the grass and it didnt seem like anything was chewing at the roots or shoots. A few pieces would come out with ease but for the most part it is just longer grass that is laying over and completely browned out.

BLC1
08-21-2012, 09:18 PM
Anybody have ideas on this?

Smallaxe
08-22-2012, 10:06 AM
Fungal diseases do that to grass... also an abundance of water on greasy soil will cause roots to be in that condition...

BLC1
08-22-2012, 10:21 AM
What would you recommend putting down on the lawn. I can't remember running into any fungal diseases over the last couple of years.

MTC314
08-22-2012, 09:36 PM
Looks to me that what ever fungus was present did its thing and is done for the season. I would just keep my eye on it and see if it continues to spread. If it seems to be done just power seed those areas and it will fill in before the season is over. If it seems to be getting worse I would go to your local supplier and buy a fungicide.

turfmd101
08-22-2012, 11:26 PM
Looks like old pythium rootrot. Some 8-10-10 should recover this. Only thing is these areas look mechanical damage also. Any chance someone did a miss treatment?
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DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-23-2012, 12:31 AM
Careful with turning right to synthetic fungicides. I have been dealing with Necrotic Ring Spot and found fungicides totally ineffective in trying to contain this fungal.

Smallaxe
08-23-2012, 07:05 AM
It may not even be a fungal disease, that is just a possibility to consider... living thatch could be at the core of the problem, in that shallow roots and unhealthy plants live there already... I would look at the living thatch issue and soil conditions first... as stated, fungicides may not even help... doing more looking and analyzing the situation may be called for...

BLC1
08-23-2012, 08:01 AM
I was reading about plythium root rot this morning and it sounds like that is caused by the ground being over saturated. We are far from that this summer. We haven't had any rain for months up until a couple of weeks ago.

These spots were starting to show up about 6 weeks ago. They turned a little worse since then. I would rule out miss treatment because we actually help off on doing anything because of the drought for quite a while.

turfmd101
08-23-2012, 08:25 AM
Sorry. What type of turf, what geography. These things matter. It could be simply meltout du to a complete flop in the environment. Extremely dry to extremely wet. All hybrid turf varieties suffer this. Its part of being hybrid and not native.
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Smallaxe
08-23-2012, 10:16 AM
I was reading about plythium root rot this morning and it sounds like that is caused by the ground being over saturated. We are far from that this summer. We haven't had any rain for months up until a couple of weeks ago.

These spots were starting to show up about 6 weeks ago. They turned a little worse since then. I would rule out miss treatment because we actually help off on doing anything because of the drought for quite a while.

Your lawn is not equal to your neighbor's lawn when it comes to drought stress... soils are different and mowing habits are different... everyone sees fungal diseases when they mow too short on dried roots, when they shouldn't have been mowing at all...
That is the number one reason for dead spots on turf during the heat of the summer... You might want to check the soils and see why this area is worse than the others... the screwdriver test shows that it goes easily into sand which allows water to drain quickly...
Actually looking at what you have for soil to the depth of 8" will go a long way to telling you why one section of lawn is different than other sections...

RigglePLC
08-23-2012, 11:31 AM
In the first picture the foreground area looks to be wilted. In the last photo it appears to have burned out from the heat and has not recovered yet. Dead spots in the other photos, I don't know. Wood fence causes heat buildup because it blocks cooling air currents. Are you in Ohio? Was it over 90? Rake out dead grass and reseed. This week is best, as high soil temperatures cause rapid germination. Use top-quality seed. Consider switching to a top-quality tall fescue blend. It may not match your blue/perennial rye, but it is more heat tolerant (90 degrees is fine). Be sure any seed you buy is disease tolerant--and that it at least CLAIMS to be heat tolerant.
Kentucky bluegrass is hard to start from seed, but if you buy sod all the hard work has been done for you. Easy and quick.

unit28
08-23-2012, 07:33 PM
...sorokiniana{sp}?
I'd be looking at some hosts for samples. Getting into cooler temps may help fungi control methods. Management of turf may also need to be addressed.
If I could say a thorough exam is needed in a word, the answer is yes.

http://extension.umass.edu/turf/fact-sheets/leaf-spot-diseases-turf

BLC1
08-23-2012, 07:38 PM
I am in northern Ohio, grass is probably bg, rye, fescue mix.

unit28
08-23-2012, 07:43 PM
<-sorokiniana -The pathogen has a wide host range including Kentucky and annual bluegrass, creeping and colonial bentgrass, tall and fine-leaf fescues, and perennial ryegrass->

maynardGkeynes
08-23-2012, 10:24 PM
I don't think we can say anything meaningful to the OP based on the photos he posted. It's a lawn with bare spots, which is like a person with a cough. Means nothing.