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steppinthrax
08-24-2012, 01:38 PM
So around July/August I posted in this forum regarding re-seedning my lawn. I went ahead and followed the instructions of using roundup to kill everything, dethatched and reseeded with Scotts Contractor Grade Seed. I used a Scotts ezspreader on a 13 setting. Within a few weeks the grass seed started growing. Grew best in shadded areas, but the results was satisfactory, it was mainly spotty, some areas grew good some areas had barely any grass.

Well over time all the grass pretty much died and now I have a yard full of broadleaf weeds.

Smallaxe
08-25-2012, 09:38 AM
So,,, do you know why your grass died??? What zone do you live in???

Remington351
08-25-2012, 06:06 PM
Your grass all died because you attempted to over-seeding in the middle of summer. Over-seeding is best done in late September and October for my area in the mid-Atlantic. I don't know what zone your in, but I can't think of any area, except maybe Alaska:) where you would try to establish new grass in July.

Most new grasses germinate best with a soil temperature around 65-75f and plenty of water. Both of those conditions were practically non-existent in the lower 48 for the past 3-4 months.

Get ready to hit the weeds with Round-Up and try again next month. I think you'll see some better results. Where are you located?

steppinthrax
08-27-2012, 11:14 AM
Your grass all died because you attempted to over-seeding in the middle of summer. Over-seeding is best done in late September and October for my area in the mid-Atlantic. I don't know what zone your in, but I can't think of any area, except maybe Alaska:) where you would try to establish new grass in July.

Most new grasses germinate best with a soil temperature around 65-75f and plenty of water. Both of those conditions were practically non-existent in the lower 48 for the past 3-4 months.

Get ready to hit the weeds with Round-Up and try again next month. I think you'll see some better results. Where are you located?

I'm in Maryland. I was told by one homeowner that I put no soil down, I should have placed fertilizer down????

Remington351
08-27-2012, 03:53 PM
I'm not an expert, but I've had pretty good success in the last couple of years with the following process.

1. Third week of September, spray the area that you want to reseed with roundup. Kill everything.

2. One week after applying the roundup you will need to rake/power rake/dethatch and remove the dead material. You wont be able to get every last strand of dead grass/weeds up, but you goal is to have a bare dirt upon which you reapply the seed.

3. Seeding. I've had good success with Rebel TTTF. Since your in Maryland you really need to go with a TTTF. Some people may tell you that Kentucky bluegrass will work, but I have not had much success. When applying the seed make sure to follow the instructions on the bag for application rate. Rent a slit seeder. Too little and it will be spotty, too much seed (yes you can put down too much seed. Ask me how I know) and you will get thatch/die-off next year. If your doing a large area you may want to hire a landscape company to do the seeding.

4. After seeding if you have access to a lawn roller that would help push the seed into the soil. If not, it's not a deal-breaker.

5. Seed cover. This is the material that you put on top of the new seed to keep it moist and protected from wind and birds. I prefer peat moss. It's expensive compared to straw, but anytime I've used straw I get a horrible amount of crabgrass from the straw the following summer.

6. Water, water, water. Keep the seed moist before, and during germination.

7. Be careful with your fertilizer application so as not to burn the seedlings.

If you use TTTF you should seed grass sprouting within 2 weeks. Keep if watered and let if go unmowed until it's over 3 inches tall. Don't mow below 3 inches until next spring. Good luck.

Smallaxe
08-28-2012, 10:14 AM
I'm not an expert, but I've had pretty good success in the last couple of years with the following process.

1. Third week of September, spray the area that you want to reseed with roundup. Kill everything.

2. One week after applying the roundup you will need to rake/power rake/dethatch and remove the dead material. You wont be able to get every last strand of dead grass/weeds up, but you goal is to have a bare dirt upon which you reapply the seed.

3. Seeding. I've had good success with Rebel TTTF. Since your in Maryland you really need to go with a TTTF. Some people may tell you that Kentucky bluegrass will work, but I have not had much success. When applying the seed make sure to follow the instructions on the bag for application rate. Rent a slit seeder. Too little and it will be spotty, too much seed (yes you can put down too much seed. Ask me how I know) and you will get thatch/die-off next year. If your doing a large area you may want to hire a landscape company to do the seeding.

4. After seeding if you have access to a lawn roller that would help push the seed into the soil. If not, it's not a deal-breaker.

5. Seed cover. This is the material that you put on top of the new seed to keep it moist and protected from wind and birds. I prefer peat moss. It's expensive compared to straw, but anytime I've used straw I get a horrible amount of crabgrass from the straw the following summer.

6. Water, water, water. Keep the seed moist before, and during germination.

7. Be careful with your fertilizer application so as not to burn the seedlings.

If you use TTTF you should seed grass sprouting within 2 weeks. Keep if watered and let if go unmowed until it's over 3 inches tall. Don't mow below 3 inches until next spring. Good luck.

It seems to me that wasting all of that dead grass material, just to turn around and buy seed cover, is counter-productive... If you slit seed under your dead lawn, you have better cover that you could ever get with anything else, including peat... :)

mdlwn1
08-28-2012, 12:47 PM
It seems to me that wasting all of that dead grass material, just to turn around and buy seed cover, is counter-productive... If you slit seed under your dead lawn, you have better cover that you could ever get with anything else, including peat... :)

This is dead on.

As to the homeowner...you have to babysit new seed during less than perfect weather, less than perfect soil, etc. Those are judgement calls based on current factors at YOUR location.

Remington351
08-29-2012, 06:43 PM
It seems to me that wasting all of that dead grass material, just to turn around and buy seed cover, is counter-productive... If you slit seed under your dead lawn, you have better cover that you could ever get with anything else, including peat... :)

This fine bit of analysis is being brought to us by the same guy who tried to reseed his lawn in July when the temperature was 95 and over?:laugh:

Just as my grandfather used to say "Nobody has the time or money to do it right...but everybody has the time and money to do it over."