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sea ox
09-06-2012, 08:04 AM
Any ideas? Gets watered early in the morning once a day for 15min. Doesnt seem dry or overwatered at all.

Smallaxe
09-06-2012, 09:04 AM
Open up the soil, or at least lift up the dead turf and tell us what you see... if you physically inspect the root zone you'll have your answer... my guess is your root zone is dry and the living thatch is impermeable... let us know what you see... :)

RigglePLC
09-06-2012, 12:44 PM
Could have been burned out during last month's hot spell. Partly recovered now. Why is it...that the area near his neighbor's sprinklers is green and healthy? Check for brown patch disease.
I am not so sure about the triangular green area coming down from the bushes...perhaps extra moisture there, or perhaps that is tall fescue or bluegrass and survived the heat better. I suspect that the rest is perennial rye which didn't withstand the drought.
Is this area irrigated? Did you ask for a copy of their water bill?

suzook
09-06-2012, 02:34 PM
It looks burnt out to me. Ouch!

sea ox
09-06-2012, 10:40 PM
Yes the lawn is irrigated. I checked the system and adjusted the heads but seems to be operating fine. He has old school sprinklers heads that dont pop up and i am going to change them. I dont think that is the problem though. Im thinking its a disease because lawns are thriving around here. We have been getting a good amount of rain. It seems like it gets worse every week. How do you check for brown patch disease and what can you do for it?
The brown turf started out as a ring around the lamp post and keeps spreading. I just figured it was from dog piss at first:hammerhead:

sea ox
09-06-2012, 10:44 PM
also it did the same thing last year and I thatched, aerated, and seeded. The lawn looked great after that.

Smallaxe
09-07-2012, 11:01 AM
If you're not going to look at the soil then just wait and see what comes back , then overseed the parts that don't... the only way to tell which fungicide to get and how to apply it is to know what disease, if any, you have...
Assumptions and bad Guesses, really cause problems for simple lawns... grass is the easiest thing in the world to grow... except for the invasives, of course, but grass only stumbles when we put too many stumling blocks out there... these stumbling blocks are known as, "Lawncare Practices"... :)

Dave does lawns
09-07-2012, 11:17 AM
When was the last fertilizer ap done?

I would look at the root level as axe suggested and maybe pull a few plugs in the brown near the green and monitor the area you pulled plugs from over a week or so.

How long has this appearance been developing?

RigglePLC
09-07-2012, 12:17 PM
I cannot see any sprinkler heads near the lamp post. Nearly impossible to water that irregular area without throwing water on concrete. If you overseeded last year with a mix containing perennial ryegrass seed--maybe it turned out to contain mostly ryegrass in the final result. Not so good in hot humid weather or hot dry conditions. Susceptible to brown patch in hot weather.
Here is info on brown patch.
http://plantscience.psu.edu/research/centers/turf/extension/factsheets/managing-diseases/brown-patch

Perhaps this should be sodded with pure Kentucky bluegrass. Quick, dark green, and would probably withstand hot conditions better next year Try to get top-quality sod that is suited to your local conditions and is disease resistant.

Mark Oomkes
09-07-2012, 12:47 PM
Looks like drought damage to me.

Maybe some insect issues as well. Throw in some fungus, and there you have it.

44DCNF
09-07-2012, 12:54 PM
Shallow roots from frequent but shallow watering. Stress and dormancy from the drought. It's slowly snapping back in other areas as well. Be vigilant with fall weeds taking over in the thin spots, but wait untill the grass has recovered for a while to spot spray if needed.

Was the area recently more shaded, before a tree fell or was removed? This can also happen when there's a sudden sun exposure/microclimate change like that, to where it can take a couple seasons to fully rebound.

TScapes
09-07-2012, 09:02 PM
I'd pull back some of the dead turf with a shovel and inspect for grubs. As for disease, if you look at the leaf blade of the dead and the edge of where it is green... look for any lesions with dark brown borders that have turned brown or even gray. That is probably brown patch or could be another disease like dollar spot. If you see the lesions, just get a fungicide and go ahead and treat the areas. Either way, you will HAVE to overseed. If it is a fungus, plan on pre-treating the area next season to prevent it.

maynardGkeynes
09-08-2012, 12:02 AM
Shallow roots from frequent but shallow watering. Stress and dormancy from the drought. ...Agree. Look at the neighbor's lawn. If fungus, neighbor would show some signs of brown patch etc., but theirs looks real good.

TScapes
09-08-2012, 12:15 AM
Agree. Look at the neighbor's lawn. If fungus, neighbor would show some signs of brown patch etc., but theirs looks real good.

Umm... Yes a fungus spreads, but just because a neighbor has it doesn't mean it's gonna spread to yours and vise versa.

TScapes
09-08-2012, 12:20 AM
Also, upon further review of your pics... you have some serious separation from the soil and the sidewalk. That is a classic sign of drought or extreme heat stress. It also appears that there is some dead or "Burn" on the alberta. Without actually seeing the location in person, these are only assumptions based on your photos.

maynardGkeynes
09-08-2012, 01:02 AM
Umm... Yes a fungus spreads, but just because a neighbor has it doesn't mean it's gonna spread to yours and vise versa.Fungus damage is a lot less frequent than drought damage. If you have to guess what is causing a bunch of large, dry looking areas with virtually no information other than a couple of pictures, your first guess should be the one that is the most common cause, which is drought damage. But it is a guess -- it could be many other things. Also, a lot of these fungi are ubiquitous, so you don't need spreading from lawn to lawn. It's the heat and humidity that brings it out. I assume that is the same at both yards.

Smallaxe
09-08-2012, 09:19 AM
Also, upon further review of your pics... you have some serious separation from the soil and the sidewalk. That is a classic sign of drought or extreme heat stress. It also appears that there is some dead or "Burn" on the alberta. Without actually seeing the location in person, these are only assumptions based on your photos.

The O.P. says he has enough water,,, so that can't be the problem... he doesn't have to check the root zone because he already knows that the turf is getting irrigated...

Every season we get 100 cases of fungus for every 3 cases of Summer Burnout... :)

sea ox
09-08-2012, 09:26 AM
Thanks for everyones input. The alberta is brown from red spiders. The neighbors lawn looks nice because that house was just built and the sod laid about a month ago. I will definitely inspect the root zone the next time im out that way and collect some more pictures!! I over seeded with a mix of perrienal rye, fescue, and bluegrass last fall.
It is definitely not heat damage because the lawn was nice and green all summer. This only developed about 3 weeks ago and it has been cool and rainy here for the most part

sea ox
09-08-2012, 09:29 AM
Across the street is a city maintained island with no irrigation and it is lush and green. Of course its all weeds :)

RigglePLC
09-08-2012, 11:36 AM
Could be gray leaf spot.
as here.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=8&ved=0CE0QFjAH&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.extension.purdue.edu%2Fextmedia%2FBP%2FBP-107-W.pdf&ei=KVZLUJu6J6iE2QX72YCoAQ&usg=AFQjCNH9De7KZOLe474XuGKu7QX20A5mHA

Be sure you can identify it, and that you are also familiar with red thread disease.
Whenever a turf is renovated and reseeded like you did last year. If you plant a mixture containing perennial ryegrass...the quick germination can result in a predominately ryegrass lawn...you may have near zero bluegrass. Worse yet, if you planted a mix that contained an inexpensive perennial ryegrass variety...that turf may not have much disease resistance.
Blazer 4 has good resistance to gray leaf spot.
http://pickseed.com/usa/proTurf/turf/index.html

maynardGkeynes
09-08-2012, 11:37 AM
The O.P. says he has enough water,,, so that can't be the problem... he doesn't have to check the root zone because he already knows that the turf is getting irrigated...
Every season we get 100 cases of fungus for every 3 cases of Summer Burnout... :) Ok, I see your point. Still, I am pretty surprised it could all go from a good green lawn to this in just 3 weeks due to fungus alone. I think gray leaf spot can do that, but not brown patch, which takes longer to spread this much. So I wonder what the fungus is. First, he needs to look at the leaves to see whether there are the usual fungus signs, ie brown spots, slimy grass, etc. If so, he can take some clippings and put them in a bag overnight. Gray leaf spot will show up as a gray mold instead of the cottony stuff you get with brown patch, dollar spot etc. Could be grubs, but there would have to be a heck of a lot to do this.

Mark Oomkes
09-08-2012, 12:22 PM
I like how he has just about a unanimous number of members telling him it's definitely some amount of drought stress\damage, but he keeps insisting it isn't.

I think we can all agree that it is drought related, with something else going on. Whether that be insects, fungus, thatch or all 3 combined, the majority of the issue present is drought related.

motion
09-14-2012, 03:11 AM
I would say it is burned out, might have grubs eating the roots, or a root rot problem caused from watering everyday.... Daily watering is not a good thing, unless your watering a seed bed.. Established lawns should be waterd heavily then alowed to dry a few days before the next wattering.. To encourage a healthy sod base to form.