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Agape
09-07-2012, 11:42 AM
Yeah, I'm a newbie.
How many of you go to an estimate and give a quote right on the spot?
Right now I take measurements and talk to the HO at the first meeting, and then provide a quote within a week.
As I get more product/ pricing knowledge I can probably give an immediate bid on most stuff.

Just wondering the "norm":waving:

LTL
09-07-2012, 04:38 PM
You may get other ideas here, but NEVER EVER give on the site quotes. This could really backfire on you. You need time to look over all the details of the project as to make sure you don't miss anything.

xtreem3d
09-07-2012, 04:56 PM
You may get other ideas here, but NEVER EVER give on the site quotes. This could really backfire on you. You need time to look over all the details of the project as to make sure you don't miss anything.

What he said.....i also let the customer know ahead of time that i will need to go back and figure the bid so they aren't disappointed.

zedosix
09-07-2012, 05:24 PM
On the spot quotes is ok if you have a tree to cut or a stump to pull out, but for a detailed hardscape job its not possible to be accurate "on the spot"

Agape
09-07-2012, 08:08 PM
Ok, thanks.
That's what i figured but i wanted to make sure i wasn't missing something.

DVS Hardscaper
09-07-2012, 08:49 PM
Let's lose the term "bid". Auctions have "bids".

And let's use the term "proposal"

Or "quote"





.

all ferris
09-07-2012, 08:50 PM
On the spot quotes is ok if you have a tree to cut or a stump to pull out, but for a detailed hardscape job its not possible to be accurate "on the spot"

I can usually get pretty close. I like to get a feel for people by giving them a ballpark number and see their reaction. If the ballpark number is in their price range I will do an exact quote and give it to them at a later date. I hate wasting my time doing a quote when the people can't afford it in the first place or don't want to spend that much. Some people have no clue how expensive a job can be or what actually goes into a hardscape project.

Some people don't realize the expense of having all the right equipment to do a large hardscape. So they think the job shouldn't cost as much. It's nothing to have over $100,000 worth of equipment on a job site.

SDLandscapes VT
09-07-2012, 10:01 PM
$100,000 easily--I can almost get there will the fall clean-up setup for the maintenance division

Most people just don't have a clue what good landscaping costs--I tell most that the biggest portion of my job is expectation management

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
09-07-2012, 10:45 PM
I agree with DVS.
You bid at an auction. We submit proposals.
Posted via Mobile Device

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
09-07-2012, 10:50 PM
$100,000 easily--I can almost get there will the fall clean-up setup for the maintenance division

Most people just don't have a clue what good landscaping costs--I tell most that the biggest portion of my job is expectation management
$50,000 truck
$7000for trailer
$17000 two mowers
$400 blower
$650 two string trimmers.
Cost of equip. Only.
No labor, insurance, fuel, replacement cost, or any other misc. Costs!

No mrs. Needlebaum,
I cant mow your lawn for $15.00 dollars.
Posted via Mobile Device

DVS Hardscaper
09-07-2012, 11:35 PM
$50,000 truck
$7000for trailer
$17000 two mowers
$400 blower
$650 two string trimmers.
Cost of equip. Only.
No labor, insurance, fuel, replacement cost, or any other misc. Costs!

No mrs. Needlebaum,
I cant mow your lawn for $15.00 dollars.
Posted via Mobile Device



Well.....you really dont need a $50k truck for mowing a 15,000 square foot lawn. This can be done with a Ford Ranger with the bed removed and a small flatbed installed.

So no trailer needed.

$17K for 2 mowers?? Thats ridiculous for residential. There are ways to own mowers for far far far less.

Lawn guys have no idea how to keep overhead as low as possible. They buy big trucks, they use big trailers and big mowers. And they mow a lawn on the east side of town, then load the equipment and travel over to the west side of town to cut another lawn. Very foolish. And not seeing the big picture.


,

SDLandscapes VT
09-07-2012, 11:41 PM
I couldn't agree with this more.


Well.....you really dont need a $50k truck for mowing a 15,000 square foot lawn. This can be done with a Ford Ranger with the bed removed and a small flatbed installed.

So no trailer needed.

$17K for 2 mowers?? Thats ridiculous for residential. There are ways to own mowers for far far far less.

Lawn guys have no idea how to keep overhead as low as possible. They buy big trucks, they use big trailers and big mowers. And they mow a lawn on the east side of town, then load the equipment and travel over to the west side of town to cut another lawn. Very foolish. And not seeing the big picture.


,

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
09-08-2012, 06:58 AM
Dvs you could use a chisel and a hammer to cut pavers but i bet you have a saw.
Posted via Mobile Device

DVS Hardscaper
09-08-2012, 07:22 AM
There is a Lawnsite member whom
I am friends with that started and is running a multi-million dollar successful lawn mowing company. Using only small trucks, not a single trailer, and buying new mowers that cost a fraction of the $17k.

You get guys with no education and no ability to understand economics cutting lawns and their focus is more on ego than business and economics.
Posted via Mobile Device

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
09-08-2012, 08:57 AM
How do you know how I started?
Posted via Mobile Device

all ferris
09-08-2012, 12:13 PM
come on guys....the op asked about giving onsite bid...not about how much lawn mowers and trucks cost. I simply brought up the cost of equipment to point out the most people don't realize the costs associated with hardscaping, therefor they don't understand why a hardscaping job could be so expensive.

Off this tangent and back on topic. My apologies to the op.

DVS Hardscaper
09-08-2012, 01:17 PM
come on guys....the op asked about giving onsite bid...not about how much lawn mowers and trucks cost. I simply brought up the cost of equipment to point out the most people don't realize the costs associated with hardscaping, therefor they don't understand why a hardscaping job could be so expensive.

Off this tangent and back on topic. My apologies to the op.

"op"?

What on earth is an "op"?
Posted via Mobile Device

all ferris
09-08-2012, 02:08 PM
"op"?

What on earth is an "op"?
Posted via Mobile Device

I thought you knew it all...very common abbreviation for "original poster"

DVS Hardscaper
09-08-2012, 02:40 PM
I thought you knew it all...very common abbreviation for "original poster"

Thanks die the rePly! The correct term is "topic creator", as "original poster" refers to folks that posted back when the forum was new. Derived from "original settlers".

Now - you're not the 'Hardscaper in Chief' here. I am. Id we veer off topic , that's life. Ever go to do a patio estimate and you end up talking about your wife's busy schedule?

.
Posted via Mobile Device

DVS Hardscaper
09-08-2012, 02:42 PM
I thought you knew it all...very common abbreviation for "original poster"

Thanks for the reply! The correct term is "topic creator", as "original poster" refers to folks that posted back in the old daya when the forum was new. Derived from "original settlers".

Now - you're not the 'Hardscaper in Chief' here. I am. If we veer off topic , that's life. This isn't a stuffy serious forum here we're a happy family. Ever go to do a patio estimate and you end up talking about your wife's busy schedule or your football playing days?



.
Posted via Mobile Device

tadpole
09-08-2012, 04:54 PM
Thanks for the reply! The correct term is "topic creator", as "original poster" refers to folks that posted back in the old daya when the forum was new. Derived from "original settlers".
Posted via Mobile Device

And you know this because.......

Agape
09-08-2012, 05:00 PM
Lol
i think you are both correct but i did select: "create a new POST"

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
09-08-2012, 06:00 PM
All ferris and agape,
Your right. To answer the question i never will give a price on a project while initially viewing a job.
Posted via Mobile Device

AztlanLC
09-09-2012, 01:25 AM
There is only few exception where I won't give an "estimate" on site I have prices for anything that I need in my ipad, I have excel worksheets that I can input the area for the project (retaining walls, patios, pool decks, etc.) answer few question and it would tell me all the amount of materials I need for such a project, including edge restrain, pool coping, geotxtile, etc. with labor for every task.
Why I do it? It's my business and only me knows my capabilities and limitations I know if I leave not giving out my printed or emailed estimate once I get to my office procastination will impede me to provide it.

DVS Hardscaper
09-09-2012, 09:05 AM
Lol
i think you are both correct but i did select: "create a new POST"

:)

Hence - "topic creator"

:)
Posted via Mobile Device

DVS Hardscaper
09-09-2012, 09:09 AM
As far as giving on the spot pricing, there is no one answer.

XL spreadsheet or not, doesn't matter. With a laptop in your car or truck you can easily do a price in the driveway. That is for small simple jobs like a 17x24 patio. Scenarios like this is exactly why i have over 8 years of creating a super detailed job costing system.

For jobs that involve engineering, planning, designing, etc - then naturally you can't price it on the fly.

I think my comment here is the best comment yet. Welp,
We're off to the track on this awesome beautiful day to try out our brand new 65!

.
Posted via Mobile Device

lukemelo216
09-09-2012, 11:47 AM
I agree with DVS on this. Certainly for a simple little project you could price on the spot, but I never do. I will give them a ball park range since I know what our price per square foot on our most common pavers are, however; that price is never the same. When I bid pavers and landscaping, I never use unit numbers. Its always bid per job.

Example, we did a 200SF walkway for a customer where everything could be accessed with our skid to bring materials etc. I was able to install that walkway for a hair under $15/SF with hollandstone. A week later I went and bid a patio extension using hollandstone where all the materials needed to be brought down by hand, no machine access what so ever. That one was closer to about $22/SF becasue of that. So certainly I will give a price range to a customer on the spot, generally its always about 1500-2000 higher and see how they react.

And I think its probably easier to say having more like 150-200k on a hardscaping job in equipment

Truck-50k
Trailer-7k
Skid Steer-60k
Saws-1k
Dump Truck and Trailer to move equipment/material 75-100k