PDA

View Full Version : Best Fall Lawn Care Package?


recycledsole
09-20-2012, 07:38 PM
Hello Everyone
I am wondering what the best thing to do for my customers lawns in the fall is?

From what i understand its best to remove tatch, aerate, overseed and apply an organic fertilizer. Is there anything i am missing?

thanks so much

Smallaxe
09-20-2012, 09:23 PM
You are missing a reason for removing OM during the planting process... How does aeration help the seeding process, because 2-3 inch holes 2-4 inches apart isn't recommended on any seed planting process???

It is best to consider what you are doing that will benefit the seed to get the best possible environment for your seed and for the future development of the plants that survive... What is commonly known as 'thatch' is already an organic fertilizer, becuz it works in the soil as natural elements are meant to work in the soil...

good luck... :)

recycledsole
09-20-2012, 09:26 PM
Sorry smallaxe, i didnt understand the message of your post? should i not remove thatch?

Smallaxe
09-20-2012, 09:49 PM
No, it is counter productive to remove the thatch, which actually means dead grass bodies, dead weed bodies and miscellaneous lawn debris... in fact if you have maple leaves to mulch into the turf,,, go for it...

Thatch is actually the living and dead stems and roots that are completely different than what is commonly called thatch... dethatching really only affects the mulch cover and not the living thatch very much... :)

recycledsole
09-21-2012, 09:43 PM
thanks smallaxe
can i get some more inputs please?

andersman02
09-24-2012, 12:05 AM
Do not dethatch as small axe has said, it is natural fertilizer! While we dont dethatch before seeding, i can say it would help with seed/soil contact as it lifts up and allows seed to drop down better but that trade off is not worth it. Instead we tell our customers to rake and fluff the lawn to allow better seed/soil contact and better germination.

Smallaxe
09-24-2012, 09:21 AM
The interesting thing about the design of the grass seed is that it tends to dig itself into the soil during the freeze/thaw cycle, which was discovered by pasture growers long ago... I expect the this same design allows the individual seed to wash its way well below any lawn debris every time it rains...

Sounds like another experiment that proves or disproves the seeds' ability to move downward into the nether regions of the turf and be covered with dirt... :)