PDA

View Full Version : Lawn Diagnosis?!?


clayslandscape
09-29-2012, 11:16 AM
I built my house two years ago on a lot that was heavily covered in pines for hundreds of years. The front yard I have growing great as you can see in the photo. The back yard grows in and seems to get to a point where it does nothing more. The last two falls I have overseeded the back yard with a mix that had about 20% annual rye and it comes in great but of course with the heat of a Virginia summer it dies. This year after core aeration i reseeded without any rye and the grass has all germinated everywhere but it has been one month and the grass has stalled at a very young stage... What should I do?

Starter fertilizer has been added, plenty of lime... should I aerate again this fall? Is it beneficial to ever aerate more than once a season?

RigglePLC
09-29-2012, 10:08 PM
Grows in front, but not in back, but has the same soil. Does it have the same water and fertilizer? Most likely cause is a shade situation is slowing it down. Shade combined with high soil temperature kills roots. Fastest turf loss is in August.

Is this tall fescue? Have you done a soil test?
Is it weaker when the sunlight is low and stronger where there are more hours of sunlight per day? Remember we have fewer hours of sunlight in the fall.

I think you are holding your phone upside down.

clayslandscape
09-29-2012, 10:45 PM
Grows in front, but not in back, but has the same soil. Does it have the same water and fertilizer? Most likely cause is a shade situation is slowing it down. Shade combined with high soil temperature kills roots. Fastest turf loss is in August.

Is this tall fescue? Have you done a soil test?
Is it weaker when the sunlight is low and stronger where there are more hours of sunlight per day? Remember we have fewer hours of sunlight in the fall.

I think you are holding your phone upside down.

It has a Quite a bit of shade. I have seeded a park shady mix back there. The best grass has been when the rue has come in the past few winters and been great til heat. Soil test has been done and pH and nit are good.
Posted via Mobile Device

Smallaxe
09-30-2012, 10:08 AM
Here again, it is necessary to know what type(texture) the soil is... is it heavy, light or a pleasantly rich loam... does it drain or puddle after heavy rains...

I've never had an issue with grass on soil with good tilth and humus... so a quick observation of your soil, when it rains, will tell you a lot...

clayslandscape
09-30-2012, 10:49 AM
The soil doesn't absorb the water really fast but it does absorb. I am on a very small slope so it does not stand or pool. I haven't watered the rest of the yard but have been watering short increments in the back because the soil dries out pretty fast.
Posted via Mobile Device

Kiril
09-30-2012, 10:54 AM
What should I do?

Learn how to rotate your images.

Also irrigate and expect to be overseeding every year in heavily shaded scenarios.

clayslandscape
09-30-2012, 11:00 AM
Learn how to rotate your images.

Also irrigate and expect to be overseeding every year in heavily shaded scenarios.

My question is the grass has come to a standstill after germinating and seems to be stuck at about 2.5 inches tall. It' doesn't seem to be maturing anymore.
Posted via Mobile Device

Smallaxe
09-30-2012, 11:14 AM
Grasss seed does that... I believe that the hormones that operate the phototropic design in the plant is signalling a decrease in daylight hours and therefore is concetrating it resources into developing roots...

"The water doesn't soak in quickly, but it dries out quickly",,, so your solution is short quick irrigation events??? Isn't that counterproductive??? maybe your new grass is signalling water conservation in order to survive the winter... :)

Kiril
09-30-2012, 11:17 AM
My question is the grass has come to a standstill after germinating and seems to be stuck at about 2.5 inches tall. It' doesn't seem to be maturing anymore.

Blade height is not the only measure of plant growth.

clayslandscape
09-30-2012, 11:25 AM
Blade height is not the only measure of plant growth.

I am agree but the lateral spread is not occurring as it has in all the other yards I have overseeded this year.
Posted via Mobile Device

RigglePLC
09-30-2012, 11:26 AM
Rye grows fast, but it is not so good in the heat. Does best north of Wash DC or in the mountains. Hopefully, you are looking at bluegrass, which is slower, and it may be a low-growing compact dwarf type. There is probably some fine fescue in there as well. It may be you are really in tall fescue country. Shade, heat, dryness and humidity are tough on grass. Trees do fine.
Members here who are closer to you can suggest locally adapted seed types.

What is your fertility program? Slow release nitrogen during fall rains will be a help, I suspect.

Kiril
09-30-2012, 11:37 AM
I am agree but the lateral spread is not occurring as it has in all the other yards I have overseeded this year.

What are the specific varieties of seed you used?

turfmd101
09-30-2012, 02:58 PM
Grasss seed does that... I believe that the hormones that operate the phototropic design in the plant is signalling a decrease in daylight hours and therefore is concetrating it resources into developing roots...

"The water doesn't soak in quickly, but it dries out quickly",,, so your solution is short quick irrigation events??? Isn't that counterproductive??? maybe your new grass is signalling water conservation in order to survive the winter... :)

What...no....come on....really?! Noooo..

Ta-Da...and for my next trick!

I think you nailed it.

Its like another discussion about BP FUNGUS. I've been reading. Although I think the industry is adopting BS FUNGUS...Brown spot fungus.

It's all about....putting down a preventive fungicide (like that's good thinking!) or trying to modify the pH (might be helpful).

All I can say is. Avoid any type of nitrogen especially in your known hotspots. Then...when the time is right and certain conditions become favorable so the turf can withstand it...force some drought stress in the turf. Drought stress not drought damage!

If BP or BS is not allowed to come out of dormancy and feed. It will mostly die off... greatly diminishing its chance to return next time around.

Enough of all the non-cultural talk.
Posted via Mobile Device

clayslandscape
09-30-2012, 05:16 PM
What are the specific varieties of seed you used?

60% Trapeze Creeping Red Fescue, 30% Jamestown IV Chewings Fescue, 5% Primary Perennial Ryegrass, 5% Corsair Kentucky Bluegrass.
Posted via Mobile Device

Kiril
10-01-2012, 10:04 AM
combination of shade and turf variety is the reason why you aren't seeing much lateral spread. In other words, don't worry about it. As I said before, you will need to overseed this area yearly. You may even want to get into the habit of just throwing out some seed during times when natural rainfall is prevalent.