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View Full Version : How can you tell when the season is over?


Toro 455
10-07-2012, 07:01 AM
Customers ask me. My wife asks me. All I can tell them is "when the grass stops growing".

What's the best indicator of that? After the first hard freeze? After it snows?

Here in Ohio I've seen the grass grow into December, and other years it quits the end of September. What's the key? Soil temperatures? Moisture?

I've been mowing for years and still havn't figured it out.

grandview (2006)
10-07-2012, 07:32 AM
When your mower needs chains for the snow,that's when I stop.

v6rs97
10-07-2012, 08:15 AM
I stop when the leaves start falling. It becomes too much like a clean up then for a weekly cutting price

gcbailey
10-07-2012, 08:48 AM
in extreme southern WV typically the grass becomes dormant early Nov. So technically the season is probably over then. However.... we are still mowing (mulch/bag) leaves and doing fall cleanups until the first part of Dec, normally. We always have at least one measurable snow before Dec, but probably 60% of our clients want everything up and the rest let the leaves lay around and rot until the spring.

Southern Heritage
10-07-2012, 08:59 AM
We stop January first. Alabama weather is crazy though. But in a seriousness it all depends on Mother Nature.

Glenn Lawn Care
10-07-2012, 10:03 AM
When there is snow on the ground.

32vld
10-07-2012, 10:32 AM
Customers ask me. My wife asks me. All I can tell them is "when the grass stops growing".

What's the best indicator of that? After the first hard freeze? After it snows?

Here in Ohio I've seen the grass grow into December, and other years it quits the end of September. What's the key? Soil temperatures? Moisture?

I've been mowing for years and still havn't figured it out.



Best thing is to keep a record every year when the first and last mow is done.
Some years the season starts early or late. The same for the end of the season.

Also record day and night time temps and rainfall. To see a connection to start/end dates.

Then compare fall fert prop's to non fall fert props for dates.

By having a record you can tell the customer a range for when the mowing season starts and ends for your area.

Where I live lawns go dormant long before snow.

As to stop mowing because leaves fall down you shorten the mowing season for no reason. If the grass is still growing mow it. Even though you mulch during the season mulching light leaf fall will not harm or leave the lawn looking bad. Then if lawn is still growing and leaf fall get heavier you mow and bag. Bag will be filled mostly with mulched leaves. Makes the fall cleanup easier. This is why I'm going to try doing it this way this year.

Thing is if leaves get heavy enough to make a weekly mowing take more time then you charge more for doing a combined weekly mow/fall cleanup.

For example, if you're done mowing Oct 26. Do weekly cleanups till Dec 7 that is 6 weeks. You spread out the work, spreading out the cash flow coming in. One week the lawn is wet you don't have to knock yourself out because next week the leaves will be dry.

This is what I'm offering my current lawn clients. Those that call after all the leaves fall will get the one time price.

CTS Lawn & Landscape
10-07-2012, 10:39 AM
I stop normally right around Thanksgiving. My season is really over when all the leaves are off the trees. Sometimes it goes into 2 weeks of December. I normally send a letter out the time I'll be stopping If the customers still want me to do leaf clean-up due to Oaks and Bradford pears being the last ones to fall, they call me.

turfmd101
10-07-2012, 10:47 AM
Customers ask me. My wife asks me. All I can tell them is "when the grass stops growing".

What's the best indicator of that? After the first hard freeze? After it snows?

Here in Ohio I've seen the grass grow into December, and other years it quits the end of September. What's the key? Soil temperatures? Moisture?

I've been mowing for years and still havn't figured it out.


Soil temperatures dictate growth.
Posted via Mobile Device

Toro 455
10-08-2012, 06:37 AM
Soil temperatures dictate growth.
Posted via Mobile Device


That's what I was thinking. But my local soil temperature monitoring service only gives soil temps for springtime applications. It would be nice if they included fall temps too.

http://www.gddtracker.net/

grandview (2006)
10-08-2012, 06:44 AM
If you can keep cutting and charging then keep the mowers going.

tbambersvc
10-13-2012, 09:01 AM
I was wondering the same thing. I'm planning on stopping sometime next month or when all the leaves are down. A record is a good idea, will keep those for next year.

Darryl G
10-13-2012, 11:41 AM
When there is snow on the ground.

I'll second that, but sometimes I end up going back out after it melts. I usually wrap things up the week before Christmas.

Duekster
10-13-2012, 11:51 AM
We start slowing down.... skipping weeks and such but we stop mowing around Thanksgiving around here.

OakNut
10-13-2012, 12:53 PM
It's over when they tell me not to cut it any more.

Some say it when September 1st rolls around. (cheap)
Some say that when the first leaf hits the ground. (cheap)

Some leave it up to me.

fatz
10-13-2012, 01:21 PM
Usually the end of November.

Kiril
10-13-2012, 01:42 PM
When my nose runs out of boggers.

STIHL GUY
10-13-2012, 08:07 PM
usually in november i switch from mowing to cleanups...after all the cleanups i do one more mow nice and short before i call it quits for the winter

Pressedun
10-15-2012, 09:20 PM
I stop normally right around Thanksgiving. My season is really over when all the leaves are off the trees. Sometimes it goes into 2 weeks of December. I normally send a letter out the time I'll be stopping If the customers still want me to do leaf clean-up due to Oaks and Bradford pears being the last ones to fall, they call me.

:cool2::cool2::cool2::cool2::cool2:

That's bout the same as me, wahoo!

BOSS LAWN 2343
10-20-2012, 03:48 AM
When there is snow on the ground.

Pretty much, clean ups continue until the snow sticks around.

jsslawncare
10-20-2012, 05:58 AM
It's never over. There's alway's money to be made.

Charles
10-20-2012, 06:28 AM
Last year, it was November the 15th which is the usual time for leaves. This year the night time temps have been much cooler, so this past week will be the last round for some yards. Lows in the 40s at night really slows down warm season grasses. Many yards already look dormant except for the weeds. Other yards that get more sunlight will be cut until the 15th. We are only getting rain every 2 weeks now which hasn't help any. So it looks like a early start and a early finish. Then the dreaded leaf season starts:cry:

charmill26
10-21-2012, 12:47 AM
I typically don't stop until the snow covers the grass. The leaves never really completely stop falling until spring around here. Last year we had a very mild winter with next to no snow. Work slowed down a lot but I was still doing certain leaf cleanups throughout the winter. It never got too cold and I don't remember much snow even building up on lots for more than a day or two. Basically do leaf cleanups as long you can as long as the weather permits it or there aren't any leaves on your customer's properties anymore

yardguy28
10-21-2012, 11:57 AM
for me the majority of the working season is over around the first week of december.

by that time most leaves are down and the first snow will be coming. after the first snow the only work done is snow removal until spring. doesn't matter how many leaves are left.

Classic Cuts Lawn Service
10-25-2012, 10:20 AM
Around here in Northern VA you never know...one year you mow til thanksgiving which is what I normall do the next year you stop before halloween