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View Full Version : Texas Low Water Use Lawn


ed2hess
10-07-2012, 09:39 PM
What do think of my lawn. I was doing a renovation on one side of my duplex and was going to install new grass and irrigation. But this broadleaf has looked good all summer with no extra irrigaton. Think I should kill it and install zoysia?

On a seperate note the rent market is very good in our area. I just put up a sign and had it rented in 3 days. Lot of 47% people with their $815 dollar checks from section 8. My unit has never been qualified by the gov, on purpose.

BeeCreekLawns
10-07-2012, 11:15 PM
I think that is Horseherb and they are actually selling it in nurseries as a groundcover. Tiny yellow flowers from spring to fall. It is a weed in my book.

Smallaxe
10-08-2012, 05:33 AM
A weed is a 'plant out of place'... I'm thinking of a few places that would be better off as clover... but people only like,,, what people like... :)

32vld
10-08-2012, 11:14 AM
Looks like a weed farm not a lawn.

If your example was to convice people to have weed farms also you would be out of a job.

Zoysia, is almost as bad. Just not as ugly. Shorter growing season means less cuts.

ed2hess
10-08-2012, 07:53 PM
Looks like a weed farm not a lawn.

If your example was to convice people to have weed farms also you would be out of a job.

Zoysia, is almost as bad. Just not as ugly. Shorter growing season means less cuts.

First off it is pretty darn hard to have a green lawn and not irrigate it in Texas. So this is green what is the problem? You haven't seen or heard about zeroscape??? This looks a lot better than most zero scape jobs. And lastly zoysia is the grass of choice in our area take a little less water, stays green, don't have as many diseases and we are still mowing it today. And I expect we will be mowing it up until December.

PlantscapeSolutions
10-09-2012, 01:02 AM
I think that is Horseherb and they are actually selling it in nurseries as a groundcover. Tiny yellow flowers from spring to fall. It is a weed in my book.

It's Horse Herb. You can also buy Oxalis and Roadside Aster as some nurseries.

32vld
10-09-2012, 10:04 AM
First off it is pretty darn hard to have a green lawn and not irrigate it in Texas. So this is green what is the problem? You haven't seen or heard about zeroscape??? This looks a lot better than most zero scape jobs. And lastly zoysia is the grass of choice in our area take a little less water, stays green, don't have as many diseases and we are still mowing it today. And I expect we will be mowing it up until December.

Zoysia up here goes dormant a month early and stays dormant about a month later then our cool weather grasses. And looks brown the whole time during the dormant period. Tend to forget how hot and dry it gets in Texas. Still that stuff looks like a weed farm.

PlantscapeSolutions
10-09-2012, 11:05 AM
First off it is pretty darn hard to have a green lawn and not irrigate it in Texas. So this is green what is the problem? You haven't seen or heard about zeroscape??? This looks a lot better than most zero scape jobs. And lastly zoysia is the grass of choice in our area take a little less water, stays green, don't have as many diseases and we are still mowing it today. And I expect we will be mowing it up until December.

Be careful because not all Zoysia types are equal. You do not want Emerald Zoysia. It is so fine textures that it does not mow well unless you have a reel mower. Palisades is nice because it tries to stay partially green all winter. I bet Palisades lawns looked great here last year.

Jammur is a popular Zoysia as well. I have El Toro in my front yard. I got 6.5 pallets for free from Denman Landscape back in 2008. The El Toro tends to come out of being partially dormant a little funky in the spring.

Zoysia hates excess water so do not flood it like you would a new St. Augustine lawn. Zoysia will actually get an orange fungal growth on the blades if you drowned it.

I have also seen Zoysia look wilted and dry after five days of cloudy weather coupled with some rainfall. Zoysias will take shade but they just seem to hate having their diet of sunlight interrupted coupled with wet weather. If you plant Zoysia in too much shade it will thin out slowly and not lose half it's density like St. Augustine and look like crap after a week.

Up north in Maine where I'm from you can shovel the snow off the lawn in the dead of winter and the grass (Fescue or Rye I think) is totally green. It weird for it to be -20F and the lawn is still green.

Weekend cut easymoney
10-09-2012, 11:17 AM
Looks like a weed farm not a lawn.

If your example was to convice people to have weed farms also you would be out of a job.

Zoysia, is almost as bad. Just not as ugly. Shorter growing season means less cuts.

I'll bet not...today we have many folks letting their yards die cause they can't afford the water and or they are moving from areas with plenty of rainfall and are not accustomed to irritating and moving from apartments and foreign countries and have no culture of taking care of lawns
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ed2hess
10-09-2012, 09:28 PM
Be careful because not all Zoysia types are equal. You do not want Emerald Zoysia. It is so fine textures that it does not mow well unless you have a reel mower. Palisades is nice because it tries to stay partially green all winter. I bet Palisades lawns looked great here last year.

Jammur is a popular Zoysia as well. I have El Toro in my front yard. I got 6.5 pallets for free from Denman Landscape back in 2008. The El Toro tends to come out of being partially dormant a little funky in the spring.

Zoysia hates excess water so do not flood it like you would a new St. Augustine lawn. Zoysia will actually get an orange fungal growth on the blades if you drowned it.

I have also seen Zoysia look wilted and dry after five days of cloudy weather coupled with some rainfall. Zoysias will take shade but they just seem to hate having their diet of sunlight interrupted coupled with wet weather. If you plant Zoysia in too much shade it will thin out slowly and not lose half it's density like St. Augustine and look like crap after a week.

Up north in Maine where I'm from you can shovel the snow off the lawn in the dead of winter and the grass (Fescue or Rye I think) is totally green. It weird for it to be -20F and the lawn is still green.

I get a lot of left over grass from King Ranch since we are located next door. So I plant whatever ....do remember toro being one I used. I know it gets fungus but most people are moving away from st aug up north here.

Toro 455
10-10-2012, 09:25 AM
. Lot of 47% people with their $815 dollar checks from section 8. My unit has never been qualified by the gov, on purpose.

My properties are Section 8 approved. Nobody has a voucher. Here in Ohio it's federally subsidized apartments.


I have nothing constructive to say about what someone should plant & grow in Texas.

PlantscapeSolutions
10-10-2012, 12:18 PM
Looks like a weed farm not a lawn.

If your example was to convice people to have weed farms also you would be out of a job.

Zoysia, is almost as bad. Just not as ugly. Shorter growing season means less cuts.

Here Zoysia means upscale clients who will spend more money most of the time not less. At $175 a pallet it not for poor people. Most new construction in the under $500-$600K range will use cheap weed prone common Bermuda while the nicer ($900K+) homes will often have Zoysia. My average Zoysia client will spend at least $4000 a year on landscape care. Just mulch for my average Zoysia account will exceed $1000.

Zoysia is also a diverse turf type. You get fine bladed Emerald and thicker bladed Jammur. It's really more like multiple grass types then just one. You can't just see what ever variety happened to be growing in NY and categorize all types as good or bad. NY is really outside the prime growing area for most of the varieties as well. If you want to see nice Zoysia yards you need to come down south where lots of people (and businesses) are moving. One of my clients moved his company here from Ohio that does about $90 million a year in sales.

In Austins city limits or even the ETJ it's now just about impossible to use St. Augustine for new construction because of water conservation requirements.

ed2hess
10-10-2012, 10:00 PM
Zoysia hates excess water so do not flood it like you would a new St. Augustine lawn. Zoysia will actually get an orange fungal growth on the blades if you drowned it.

I.

I see a little small area in my zoysia that is watered from underground. I had my son move the watering on one of our HOA to day time since it has underground watering on zoysia. Thanks for info. We are seeing a lot of fungus in our best st augustine this year.

Premier GreenScape
10-10-2012, 10:14 PM
I see a little small area in my zoysia that is watered from underground. I had my son move the watering on one of our HOA to day time since it has underground watering on zoysia. Thanks for info. We are seeing a lot of fungus in our best st augustine this year.

Same here in Houston, regarding the St. Augustine. Calls for Brown Patch are coming in quick right now.

PlantscapeSolutions
10-10-2012, 10:42 PM
I see a little small area in my zoysia that is watered from underground. I had my son move the watering on one of our HOA to day time since it has underground watering on zoysia. Thanks for info. We are seeing a lot of fungus in our best st augustine this year.

I would say you have a 50/50 chance of getting fungus in St. Augustine in the mid Sept thru late Oct time frame. Usually, any yards that are dry will not have many issues since moisture must be present for the fungal spores to become active.

You guys probably notice going into fall that one week your Augustine grows 3" and the following week it can just flat out stop growing. When you see this happen you need to dial the water back by an easy 40% (if your allowed to water). Once that growth rates tapers off the grass's need for water will also taper off sharply.

In my opinion all grasses are effected by fungal issues and this is why growth rates taper off in the fall when you would think the conditions would be conducive for lots of growth. Other grass's are just not hyper sensitive to fungal activity like Augustine.

Just like Cotton Root Rot that kills all the Oleanders the fungal activity for Augustine loves our alkaline soils. Peat moss or other measure to acidify the soil can help but it's usually too much trouble and expense to do it.

PCNB (Pentachloronitrobenzene) was the most popular fungicide but the EPA yanked it I believe. I now use Andersons Compass Fungicide which stinks was less. With PCNB a mask was really required but with the new Andersons fungicide you do not need it.

You guys need to get your license so you can do the money making applications like this yourself. You can still let TruGreen do large area weed sprays and stuff that is more difficult but do the easier money making stuff in house. The only PIA thing about a license is there is a lot of record keeping to do.