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ron mexico75
10-26-2012, 08:36 AM
I planted a shrub at a customerís house in front of the foundation. It's a B&B piece of material. It's been in the hole for 9 days total now. I get an email from the customer yesterday asking to check it out when I come to cut yesterday. When I get there the entire inside of the tree is bright yellow, lots of foliage dropped.

I don't even kneel down yet and can tell visually that the ground is soaked! I put my hand on top of the area around the root ball and SQUISH! is the sound I hear. Obviously over watered. There is irrigation in this bed so when I planted I purposely planted it high. Not good enough obviously.

The customer is going to have the irrigation company take out that head and I told her letís wait and see if it can dry out and rebound. My gut tells me it's already too late but I could be wrong. When I finished I told the lady to water it about 1-2 times a week depending on rainfall. I think because she had irrigation that it got watered 4-5 times a week.

I am a solo operator not a big company. Would you replace this at no charge? I'm thinking since its so new that would be the good thing to do but I don't want to just "give it away" you know? If the general consensus is that's the right thing to do then I have no problem with that.

I guess if this was planted in June or something and she never watered and then it died I might feel different. Seems maybe that over watering was too much of a good thing rather than just plain negligence like not watering at all would be.

I'm attaching some pics. Now that I look at the pics it doesn't look bad, but in person I think it looks worse.

What do you think?

cgaengineer
10-26-2012, 08:40 AM
Sounds overwatered to me. I had the same thing happen to a customer of mine, backed off the water and it popped back.

Customer said to me "I didn't think you could water too much" dumb...

Replace at no charge, nope. Not your fault. We ain't Home Depot. If you have a baby and bring it home and either don't feed it or over feed it, do you blame the doctor for the baby's health?
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ron mexico75
10-26-2012, 08:49 AM
Sounds overwatered to me. I had the same thing happen to a customer of mine, backed off the water and it popped back.

Customer said to me "I didn't think you could water too much" dumb...

Replace at no charge, nope. Not your fault. We ain't Home Depot. If you have a baby and bring it home and either don't feed it or over feed it, do you blame the doctor for the baby's health?
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Understood.

Get this, where I planted this was at the end of the bed in an open area next to other shrubs. After this was reported I was told that "nothing seems to grow there." Before I had this property as a customer the person said they had 2 different shrubs there and they both didn't do well and died. Hmm, I think I got my answer now.

cgaengineer
10-26-2012, 08:52 AM
The shrub I was replacing "just died" she said, I said there is a reason. I warned her that a new shrub may die as well.
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ron mexico75
10-26-2012, 01:29 PM
anyone else have a take on this or experienced this yourself?

alldayrj
10-26-2012, 01:40 PM
If it dies and you want to keep the customer then Split it wih her. The hole is already dug
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Patriot Services
10-26-2012, 03:27 PM
He warned her it might die again. I will only warranty plants and sod I can control everything on. Yes that level of aftercare costs more. If they fail to retain us the warranty expires when I step off the property.
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coolluv
10-26-2012, 04:01 PM
Arborvitae are know to have the insides turn yellow and fall off in fall. Just clean them out with your hands and let it alone.

It should be fine if not over watered. They also don't like to go dry for long periods when in the first year.

Proper watering and wait and see....that is what I would do.


One more thing. Ric taught me this. If a plant drops its leaves it usually means its going to recover. Not always but that does seem to be the case.

I had an Arborvitae die because I overwatered it and the whole thing turned brown in a week or so and nothing dropped off of it. It was my fault but we were having 100 degree weather...hottest on Ga record at the time. So I was nervous and over watered.

Dave...

easy-lift guy
10-26-2012, 04:02 PM
The Ph of the soil may also be working against you as well. When you planted the material did you notice any concert droppings?. If the Ph is incorrect in the first place the material is doomed.
easy-lift guy

coolluv
10-26-2012, 04:12 PM
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See video.





Dave...

B-2 Lawncare
10-26-2012, 04:38 PM
Give it some time it looks like it's going to come around to me. Did she ask about replacment? Or did you bring it up?

jlcrox2
10-26-2012, 09:18 PM
The shedding looks normal and the foliage still looks good so you're safe at this point. But the drainage and overwatering definitely have to be addressed or you will lose it for sure. My stance on this issue is this: as the professional you are giving the customer your expertise with the service. If you know going in that the area has issues you should be able to correct them or choose a plant to best fit the area(at their expense of course). If the customer decides they want to make the decisions against your advice then refuse to do it or refuse to warranty it. Whatever you do,going forward, I would write up a clear warranty that you will adhere to, that a customer will receive before service so questions are answered up front.

Smallaxe
10-27-2012, 10:13 AM
You might want to start scratching around your root ball to see what is happening at a 6" depth or more... is the burlap off and is the water interacting with the surrounding soil???

I think this issue is too important to leave to assumptions about the rootball...

This story reminds me of the irrigation plumber that said a couple of bushes buried on the hillside in sand was drowned becuz the sprinklers came on every day to keep the perennials alive...

I told the client "Do what you want,,, I'm not concerned about that hillside anymore"...

Next week the B&B was replaced and what was dug out was a rockhard ball of dried up clay... Now the question is:
How did the moron, come to the conclusion, that his sprinklers actually drowned aplant with a 2' rootball???

Please Note there is no hyperbole directed towards anyone on this forum, but rather the descriptive terms in reference guy in the story are as kind as I can come up with... :)

ron mexico75
10-27-2012, 10:32 AM
The tree is a dwarf hinoki cypress. I know arborvitae's drop foliage from the inside. But, this looks more from being wet then just normal shedding.

The majority of the soil make up where this was planted is clay. That's why I planted it high. I hate digging shrubs up after they've been planted but seeing this thing has only been in the ground not even two weeks, maybe I could remove the majority of the clay and mix in a compost type soil with some of the native soil that is not clay. I probably should've done that the first time but I did not know there was that much clay underneath of the mulch.
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Kiril
10-27-2012, 10:54 AM
maybe I could remove the majority of the clay and mix in a compost type soil with some of the native soil that is not clay. I probably should've done that the first time but I did not know there was that much clay underneath of the mulch.


Bad idea :nono:

ron mexico75
10-27-2012, 12:52 PM
Bad idea :nono:

Yeah, I'm just going to leave it and see what happens. I was just thinking out loud. Considering its a b&b there's no way I'm diging it up unless it dies.
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holmesgts
10-29-2012, 07:39 PM
You said it was ball and burlap keep in mind that 85% to 90% of that plants root system has been cut away and its not uncommon for B&B stuff to stress after removal. I would explain that to the client and tell them you will apply some rooting hormone and see what it does and if it doesn't improve or gets much worse then talk about replacing it, it may save you the replacement cost.

Smallaxe
10-30-2012, 07:55 AM
Scratch around enough for the feeder roots to get some air and be sure they're not already rotting, rather they are settling in well to the surrounding soils...
around here the conventional wisdom is,,, there's no need to remove the burlap, even from the necktie around the trunk...

Perhaps a thread should be started about,,, what we do when planting B&Bs... :)

A1 Outdoor Services
10-31-2012, 04:14 AM
It may just be stressed from being cut from the ground. It's almost impossible to over water a recently planted b&b, at least it is around here. If it dies though, replace it.