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View Full Version : Summer Color Sweet Potatoes Good To Eat


ed2hess
10-31-2012, 08:02 PM
Can you bake and eat these things? If I dig them all at our various site we will have a bushel or more. Could they be replanted next year? The purple vines only yielded one potatoes that is the white one.

Duekster
10-31-2012, 08:56 PM
You have a good crop. I think they are edible. They are often small in our area.

I know folks that leave them and they come back. Yes you could sprout the eyes for next season.

Also note the department of AG in Texas requires you to have a licenses to sell plants much less grow them.

Nate'sLawnCare
11-01-2012, 02:25 AM
Definitely edible. Bake at 350 for about an hour and add lots of butter :)

44DCNF
11-01-2012, 05:40 AM
You can also juice them, eat them raw after marinating them, or dehydrated. For long storage I think they are usually stored at a high humidity and high temperature-maybe 90 degrees for a while. I heard this at an organic farm in SW wisco. You can probably find the curing technique online somewhere.

For a salad of sorts, grate and marinate in a vinegar/oil/salt/seasoning and refrigerate. You can also add cucumbers this way and have a slaw of sorts.

You can also dehydrate them partially after the marinating....to where they will have a semi leathery texture....not tough like leather but not crisp like a fried shoestring.

Run through a juicer with other veggies or fruit to provide a good protein drink.

You can also dehydrate plain and then grind to a powder for smoothie protein powder. To keep the powder from caking together, add a small amount of food grade diatomaceous earth to the blender carafe as you grind the dried potato. (Food grade DE is absolutely safe to consume) I do this with various root veggies for smoothies-beets, carrots, sweet potatoes and peas.

Grate them and fry them in coconut oil in a skillet for great hash browns. They don't take as long as white potatoes.

I have a sweet potatoe casserole recipe that gets topped with pecans if you'd like it. Will find later in the day and post it if you remind me.

alexschultz1
11-01-2012, 10:39 AM
Do you know if the beds were treated with any chemicals?? I eat the ones out of my personal flower beds and they're amazing. I had one the size of a rugby ball!

ed2hess
11-01-2012, 07:26 PM
You can also juice them, eat them raw after marinating them, or dehydrated. For long storage I think they are usually stored at a high humidity and high temperature-maybe 90 degrees for a while. I heard this at an organic farm in SW wisco. You can probably find the curing technique online somewhere.

For a salad of sorts, grate and marinate in a vinegar/oil/salt/seasoning and refrigerate. You can also add cucumbers this way and have a slaw of sorts.

You can also dehydrate them partially after the marinating....to where they will have a semi leathery texture....not tough like leather but not crisp like a fried shoestring.

Run through a juicer with other veggies or fruit to provide a good protein drink.

You can also dehydrate plain and then grind to a powder for smoothie protein powder. To keep the powder from caking together, add a small amount of food grade diatomaceous earth to the blender carafe as you grind the dried potato. (Food grade DE is absolutely safe to consume) I do this with various root veggies for smoothies-beets, carrots, sweet potatoes and peas.

Grate them and fry them in coconut oil in a skillet for great hash browns. They don't take as long as white potatoes.

I have a sweet potatoe casserole recipe that gets topped with pecans if you'd like it. Will find later in the day and post it if you remind me.

Wow thanks for info. Now when I got to part about diatomaceous earth not sure about adding that:dizzy::dizzy: That is the stuff I kill buys with in the organic beds.

Duekster
11-01-2012, 09:06 PM
Wow thanks for info. Now when I got to part about diatomaceous earth not sure about adding that:dizzy::dizzy: That is the stuff I kill buys with in the organic beds.

That is a good point..... you need to know how they were treated. nonetheless they will go to seed potato's

44DCNF
11-02-2012, 06:29 PM
Food grade DE is harmless to us while being hurtful to bugs and parasites, and in fact has many added health benefits aside from it's anti-parasitic one. Does it surprise you that it is safe for humans? That's why it's used as an organic alternative to chemicals in the garden. Understand I'm talkiing food grade here, not your baited less cleanly produced and sourced garden one, although had the potatoes been treated with any non food grade DE cast on the soil, that too would be harmless to you in your eating of the potato.
Read up on DE for human consumption. You'd be surprised. It's mostly all silica which our body uses for cell stregth, just as our lawns and garden's plants do. Not different than taking a calcium or iron supplent


I would be concerned if the soil had chemikcal grub/pest or herbicidal control chemicals applied.

ed2hess
11-02-2012, 08:16 PM
Food grade DE is harmless to us while being hurtful to bugs and parasites, and in fact has many added health benefits aside from it's anti-parasitic one. Does it surprise you that it is safe for humans? That's why it's used as an organic alternative to chemicals in the garden. Understand I'm talkiing food grade here, not your baited less cleanly produced and sourced garden one, although had the potatoes been treated with any non food grade DE cast on the soil, that too would be harmless to you in your eating of the potato.
Read up on DE for human consumption. You'd be surprised. It's mostly all silica which our body uses for cell stregth, just as our lawns and garden's plants do. Not different than taking a calcium or iron supplent


I would be concerned if the soil had chemikcal grub/pest or herbicidal control chemicals applied.

Since I use Bayer all in one it has systemic for disease and bugs as well as fertilize. I don 't use it on sweetpotates but since I use it on roses close by might have a little risK/