PDA

View Full Version : What the new guys need to know.


Spring Valley Lawn Service
11-08-2012, 11:32 AM
Here is the way I run my business and things I learned.
1. Always be honest with customer.
2. Always do a good job even if you loose your a&&. It may lead to something bigger.
3. Respect the competition. Learn from there mistakes so it doesn't cost you. The guys in my area have been great to talk too
4. Have a place to work on equipment.
5. Look for deals. Don't go out and buy it unless you need right then and usually you don't
6. Don't be scared to walk away and tell a customer hey I can't handle this it is out of my league but so an so can. So so maybe able to do same for you if they have stuff they don't want
7 make sure you know how to run your equipment before you use it on someone else's yard
8. Watch the low balling. I may have done it and sure we all have and not meant too
9. Know what it costs to run your equipment.
10. Make sure your happy with what you do.

Spring Valley Lawn Service
11-08-2012, 11:36 AM
New and seasoned guys feel free to add or disagree. I m alway opened to suggestions

Exmarkboy13
11-08-2012, 10:24 PM
- quality not quantity (this also depends on the situation/application.
-Keep you equipment in good condition. If you have bigger mowers, learn about hydro systems, how they work, and how to property service them.
-Dont be afraid of used gear.
-Like said above, know your costs.
-Bill on time.

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
11-08-2012, 10:44 PM
Dont blow your wad on things you cant afford. Buy it right and keep it tight.
Posted via Mobile Device

LandFakers
11-09-2012, 08:01 AM
Don't overbook yourselves for the week. You only end up rushing around and then quality suffers

GMLC
11-09-2012, 08:40 AM
Having no plan is a plan for failure.

Network, its not what you know its who you know. Be active in your community.

Most dont fail due to bad work but from bad business practices.

Be professional in everything you do. Look and act professional.
Posted via Mobile Device

Toro 455
11-09-2012, 09:08 AM
Spring Valley;
I can tell by your list of 10 that you're a craftsman who takes pride in his work and the service you provide your customers. I especially like #10.

But I do take exception with the tone of this whole thread about being cautious about what you buy and scheduling.
There's the old saying, older than the dollar, that goes "In for a penny, in for a pound".

And "Nothing ventured, nothing gained".


Don't be too timid about commiting yourself to the job.

For instance, my nephew wants into the business. He currently has 3 lawns he mows with a 19" push mower. He was thinking of finding a used WB and maybe a trailer for his car.
He's worked for me as a kid and has a couple of years experience on a crew in Cincinnati.

My advice to him was to buy a new mower and a used truck. Study and take the pesticide license test now while he has the time to do it.

Basically to decide where you want to be in the business and head that direction like nothing is going to stop you. Like you would dive into a pool instead of wading in timidly.

Nothing motivates you to hunt for jobs like that mower payment coming due.

Sprinkler Buddy
11-09-2012, 09:12 AM
Don't expect to be at the top overnight. It takes time to build a reputation no matter how good you are. Respect your employees if you want respect back if or when you need them. Some pros here will disagree with that one. lol

DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING
11-09-2012, 01:47 PM
Spring Valley;
I can tell by your list of 10 that you're a craftsman who takes pride in his work and the service you provide your customers. I especially like #10.

But I do take exception with the tone of this whole thread about being cautious about what you buy and scheduling.
There's the old saying, older than the dollar, that goes "In for a penny, in for a pound".

And "Nothing ventured, nothing gained".


Don't be too timid about commiting yourself to the job.

For instance, my nephew wants into the business. He currently has 3 lawns he mows with a 19" push mower. He was thinking of finding a used WB and maybe a trailer for his car.
He's worked for me as a kid and has a couple of years experience on a crew in Cincinnati.

My advice to him was to buy a new mower and a used truck. Study and take the pesticide license test now while he has the time to do it.


Basically to decide where you want to be in the business and head that direction like nothing is going to stop you. Like you would dive into a pool instead of wading in timidly.

Nothing motivates you to hunt for jobs like that mower payment coming due.

My point above was to watch your costs and spend your money wisely.
Why have a mower payment when you can put those monies to work for you in advertising?
We see way to many guys show up each spring with new equipment that we are fortunate enough to purchase at the end of the season because they have simply overextended themselves.
Posted via Mobile Device

Spring Valley Lawn Service
11-09-2012, 05:12 PM
My point was I always wanted a walker. Everyone has a walker. So I got one and never use it. Great machine but my business has steered me away from the yards that need bagging. All because everyone runs a certain mower doesn't, mean you have to have one.

cpllawncare
11-11-2012, 08:37 PM
Don't overbook yourselves for the week. You only end up rushing around and then quality suffers

I found this to be my biggest challenge last year, I tried all season to schedule a certain route on a certain day each week, but the weather kept me off base all season. I found myself getting really frustrated, and to make it worse I don't know how to fix this problem for next season?

Weekend cut easymoney
11-11-2012, 10:09 PM
Some guys schedule hedge trimming and other work on Friday or Sat so they have a makeup day....or have Monday's as makeup days ..
We mow unless there is a torrential downpour
Posted via Mobile Device

Darryl G
11-11-2012, 10:49 PM
Good thread!

One thing I've learned is that downtime kills the bottom line, messes up your schedule and can ruin your relationships with your customers. Have a backup plan for as many things as you can. What if your truck breaks down, your main mower, blower, trimmer. You should have backups or some sort of contingency plan for all of the above because sooner or later it will happen.

Learn how to fix stuff yourself and bring tools and supplies with you at all times. Having some bailing wire, duct tape, expoxy (liquid and putty), a portable air pump, electrical tape and connectors and some common-sized nuts and bolts in stock can save you a run to the hardware store and keep you on schedule. And don't forget the fire extinguisher and first aid kit!!! I also bring a couple of scrap 2 x 4s, 2 x 6's and 4 x 4s with me in case I have to block something up or to support one corner of my trailer gate if I can park it on level ground. I also bring spare lubricants/fluids for everything I run as well as a spare belt for every belt on all of my equipment. I carry at least one jack stand at all times too.

cpllawncare
11-12-2012, 12:40 AM
Some guys schedule hedge trimming and other work on Friday or Sat so they have a makeup day....or have Monday's as makeup days ..
We mow unless there is a torrential downpour
Posted via Mobile Device

I'm not going to put a mower in a rain soaked yard just to keep a schedule I made a disclaimer in my service agreements about that, most understand but a few still don't get it and want it cut as soon as it dries out but by then I have another route to tend to I keep a fairly tight schedule but when it rains for two days in a row or more it's total chaos. I have managed to keep all the equipt running with very little downtime due to a rigorous maint schedule every weekend. the only maint issue I had last year was a starter and soilnoid go out but the dealer had it back up in a half a day under warranty so it wasn't to awful bad.I get the makeup day thing but I can't make up two or three days?

Blades Lawn Maintenance
11-12-2012, 01:11 AM
So far so good. I agree with all of this