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Diddy
12-07-2012, 02:27 PM
My tires have had a good,life and after this season they are pretty beat. My tire size is 16 x 650 x 8. Can anyone explain what those 3 numbers mean? Im thinking about getting a wider tire to disperse the weight better and im trying to figure out what will fit and what wont. Thanks for the help

Ridin' Green
12-07-2012, 02:43 PM
The 16 represents the tire's over height when inflated to the correct pressure (supposedly), the 6.50 is the inflated cross section of the tire in inches at its widest point (again, supposedly), and the 8 represents the wheel or rim itself. The rim will be a little bigger than that at the outer edge, but the 8" measurment is taken at the inside of the lip at the first ledge or step if you prefer (for lack of a better term right now), and is where the bead of the tire actually seats.

Not all tires with the same sidewall markings are the exact same size and shape when inflated though, so it can get confusing. You can normally fit the next wider size tire on your rim, but it will usually be a little more rounded looking than designed to be due to the beads being squeezed in to fit the narrower rim. You should be able to go to a 16x7.50x8 tire on your rims as long as you have clearence on your machine for the added width.

herler
12-07-2012, 04:30 PM
Tractor tire code

The numeric codes on tractor tires since 1955 have required either two or three numbers: W-D or H/W-D where 'W' is the width of the tire in inches, D is the diameter of the rim in inches and H (if provided) is the height of the tire. Hence, 5.00-15 is a tire that will fit a 15-inch-diameter (380 mm) rim and is 5 in (130 mm) wide but of indeterminate height. 25/5-16 is a tire that has a 5 in (130 mm) width, fits a 16-inch-diameter (410 mm) rim and whose height is approximately 25 in (640 mm).

Diddy
12-07-2012, 04:55 PM
oh ok great thanks so much I really appreciate it. Would putting on a larger tire like a 18 x 850 x 8 make sense?

Ridin' Green
12-07-2012, 06:05 PM
oh ok great thanks so much I really appreciate it. Would putting on a larger tire like a 18 x 850 x 8 make sense?

They might fit your rims, but they may or may not hold air properly due to excessive sidewall roll-in keeping the bead from seating correctly, and they will not provide you with much if any advantage since they will be too rounded in profile when aired up to a proper amount of pressure. You would really need to find a set of rims made for that size tire to gain any real advantage, and to avoid other issues that can pop up from mounting the wrong tire on the wrong rim.

Diddy
12-07-2012, 10:53 PM
would you recommend getting bigger tires and rims to make less of a foot print

Ridin' Green
12-07-2012, 10:56 PM
Wider tires will make a larger footprint (spread the weight out over a larger area), but will have less compaction which is the desired outcome. If your machine will handle them without rubbing anywhere, then I would say go for it. Wider tires ride better too.

StanWilhite
12-07-2012, 11:44 PM
This is one of those cases where you should absolutely carry your old rims and tires to a "brick and mortar store" (as opposed to ordering them over the internet).

Explain your situation, and ask for the person that would be most likely to help you. He will be able to direct you and give you your options. If the tire you mount on the rim is wider than your old tire, you can run into a situation where the tire won't sit flat on the ground (from side to side).

As the other posts said, you can also run into other problems if you're not careful, that's why you need the opinion and direction of a knowledgeable person with experience dealing with situations like this.

herler
12-08-2012, 12:05 AM
I believe one way we can control turf impact is by addressing the tread's aggressiveness, this unfortunately is not represented by numbers but can be visually determined by looking at the tire.

One example of this would be the Turf Saver vs. Turf Master tires, as the name implies the Saver is far easier on the turf but it's a trade off... The less aggressive tread tires have to be replaced sooner because there's less rubber to begin with.

For this reason I usually go with the most aggressive tread I can find, then I learn to take it real easy in the turns knowing that I won't have to replace the tire near as often, the benefit is they really hold hills well.

StanWilhite
12-08-2012, 01:13 AM
I believe one way we can control turf impact is by addressing the tread's aggressiveness, this unfortunately is not represented by numbers but can be visually determined by looking at the tire.

One example of this would be the Turf Saver vs. Turf Master tires, as the name implies the Saver is far easier on the turf but it's a trade off... The less aggressive tread tires have to be replaced sooner because there's less rubber to begin with.

For this reason I usually go with the most aggressive tread I can find, then I learn to take it real easy in the turns knowing that I won't have to replace the tire near as often, the benefit is they really hold hills well.

As you said, there's a trade off in most anything you want to talk about. Some tires are made of rubber that uses a compound that is a lot "harder" than other tires where the tread is "softer".

The "off-road looking" really aggressive tires (for all kinds of different vehicles) are made of much softer rubber to help them grip better. The trade off is the fact that the softer tread will wear much faster than the less aggressive looking tires that use the harder compound rubber.

So with really aggressive "off road" tires, what you actually end up with, is a really aggressive deep tread design that will actually wear out quicker than the less aggressive looking tread design (that is made out of a harder compound rubber).

Anyone who has run "off road" tires on a motorcycle can identify with that. When I was about 10 years old I got my first motorcycle (a Honda 90) and after wearing the first rear tire out, I bought a "knobby" for it.

It lasted less than 1/2 as long as the first tire. But man, would it "bark" when you hit second gear....and that was the main thing in the whole world back then. Everything else was just irrelevant details!!! :laugh:

Diddy
12-08-2012, 11:02 AM
I believe one way we can control turf impact is by addressing the tread's aggressiveness, this unfortunately is not represented by numbers but can be visually determined by looking at the tire.

One example of this would be the Turf Saver vs. Turf Master tires, as the name implies the Saver is far easier on the turf but it's a trade off... The less aggressive tread tires have to be replaced sooner because there's less rubber to begin with.

For this reason I usually go with the most aggressive tread I can find, then I learn to take it real easy in the turns knowing that I won't have to replace the tire near as often, the benefit is they really hold hills well.

So turf savers are the way to go?

Diddy
12-08-2012, 11:37 AM
Where do you guys get your tires at? and do you recommend a certain type for a walk behind mower?

Ridin' Green
12-08-2012, 07:10 PM
So turf savers are the way to go?

Turf Savers are one of the cheapest tires you can buy, and by that I mean least expensive, but they are also one of the cheapest tires made quality wise too, and that's why they are less expensive. They are std equipment on many low cost to middle of the road L&G tractors because they are cheaper for manu's to buy, which is because less engineering goes into them than other tires. They are also very commonly used as OEM tires on WB's since they weigh less than a L&G tractor or Z. You'd have to use them quite a while to wear them out because they are a harder rubber compound. I've never seen a Turf Saver in anything but 2 ply, and I much prefer 4 ply tires on a machine I make my living with, and can't afford down time due to a puncture or split in a too thin tire carcass. I have actuallly had a pine needle puncture a 2 ply Carlise tire on the rear of a Toro L&G tractor while mowing.

So, it depends on exactly what you want to put the new shoes on as to what would be best. I don't agree that they are easier on turf than the Turf Masters either (or Turf Trac's or any other quality tire). They have a very squared off shoulder that is a lot harder on the turf than the Turf Master's design with its slightly rounded over shoulders. On a L&G tractor they are usually OK since they generally go slower than Z's or many WB's do while mowing and making turns.

I'm not teeling you all of the stuff I have posted in this thread based off of theory or what I think they will do, or how they'll wear etc. It's based on many years of firsthand experience with all the tires I've just mentioned being used on many different machines.

Diddy
12-08-2012, 07:53 PM
Turf Savers are one of the cheapest tires you can buy, and by that I mean least expensive, but they are also one of the cheapest tires made quality wise too, and that's why they are less expensive. They are std equipment on many low cost to middle of the road L&G tractors because they are cheaper for manu's to buy, which is because less engineering goes into them than other tires. They are also very commonly used as OEM tires on WB's since they weigh less than a L&G tractor or Z. You'd have to use them quite a while to wear them out because they are a harder rubber compound. I've never seen a Turf Saver in anything but 2 ply, and I much prefer 4 ply tires on a machine I make my living with, and can't afford down time due to a puncture or split in a too thin tire carcass. I have actuallly had a pine needle puncture a 2 ply Carlise tire on the rear of a Toro L&G tractor while mowing.

So, it depends on exactly what you want to put the new shoes on as to what would be best. I don't agree that they are easier on turf than the Turf Masters either (or Turf Trac's or any other quality tire). They have a very squared off shoulder that is a lot harder on the turf than the Turf Master's design with its slightly rounded over shoulders. On a L&G tractor they are usually OK since they generally go slower than Z's or many WB's do while mowing and making turns.

I'm not teeling you all of the stuff I have posted in this thread based off of theory or what I think they will do, or how they'll wear etc. It's based on many years of firsthand experience with all the tires I've just mentioned being used on many different machines.

Thanks for the input so if you were getting new tires for your walk behind which ones would you get?

Ridin' Green
12-08-2012, 07:55 PM
Thanks for the input so if you were getting new tires for your walk behind which ones would you get?

I don't run a WB right now, but if I did, I'd be looking strictly at 4 ply tires with slightly rounded shoulders. Something like the Turf Trac 16X6.50X8 4 ply tires would be fairly easy on the turf, and I have run those in the past and know they give decent traction and are easy on the turf. The Multi Trac is another good tire, and may even be better than the Turf Trac. Both are available in the size you need and in 4 ply.

Ridin' Green
12-08-2012, 08:09 PM
Go to this link and look at the upper left colume. Clcik on the tire name and you can view it and see what sizes are available-

http://www.carlisletirestore.com/

Diddy
12-08-2012, 08:27 PM
ok great thanks so much. which will give me better traction?

Ridin' Green
12-08-2012, 09:14 PM
I've had good rtraction from both. I honestly thing the Turf Trac grabs the grass better for traction, but it may also make it tear more on tight, or Z turns.

Diddy
12-08-2012, 09:21 PM
oh ok i usually end up doing a 3 point turn when i make the turn