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icex
12-29-2012, 03:37 AM
Got a call from a engineer on a gabion wall project. I wanted to see if anyone has experience pricing these and offer advice.

I have to remove a 50ft long, 15ft tall cinderblock wall thats fell into the creek and haul it off, build a 51ft long, 6ft wide pad using compacted 57 gravel, install 51ft of gabion baskets, drive 51 peices of #7 rebar in the first row of baskets (17 baskets, 3 rebar each), tie all baskets together, install geotextile behind the baskets and backfill with 57 gravel.

I estimated 208 tons of gabion rock (4-6 inch), and 200 tons of 57 gravel for the base, and backfill.

After finished with that, cover the top of the baskets with topsoil, grade and grass.

What would you charge laborwise? I have a number in my head but want to see what everyone thinks. I will have 3-4 helpers.

icex
12-29-2012, 04:39 AM
Forgot to mention the rebar has to be 6ft long, 3 ft driven down into the ground. There are 61 gabion baskets total.

icex
12-29-2012, 03:02 PM
Bump, anyone?

icex
12-30-2012, 03:03 PM
No one has experience installing gabion baskets? I think WV is the only state in the united states that uses these things lol..

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:12 PM
I have no experiance with such a creature.
I can visualize what you are saying but what I can not see if what type of access you have and what type of equipment you will be able to utilize.

I once had an errosion control project were we drove cables into the side of the hill using a 65# jack hammer and we drove them 12 feet deep. Part of the hill was very steep, no access to equipment so we had to use shoves to create walking trails.

Most Gabions I have seen are in the NE area and they are often highway projects. I do not do highway projects.

icex
12-30-2012, 03:14 PM
I have no experiance with such a creature.
I can visualize what you are saying but what I can not see if what type of access you have and what type of equipment you will be able to utilize.

I once had an errosion control project were we drive cables into the side of the hill using a 65# jack hammer and we drove them 12 feet deep. Part of the hill was very steep, no access to equipment so we had to use shoves to create walking trails.

We'll be using a mini excavator, renting a 2500 gpm pump to divert the water in the creek away from the work area, and renting a compactor to compact the 57 gravel.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:36 PM
Here are the anchors we used. They worked very well. It was an interesting project. The HO at the bottom of the hill had the concern as stuff was falling on him. The slope was too step to walk in most places. It was clearly coming down.

I discusssed with several engineers and they started talking about 10 to 20 foot walls and bids in the hundreds of thousands.

At the top of the hill was a poured in place 10' high retaining wall and another house. The water would shed off the roof, down the back yard and jump that retaining wall. Jump a 15' wide bio swale / bearm ( just clear the whole thing) then down that 70' high slope to the bottom. We fixed part of that bottom half one year. From there the hill turned. So we fixed the side adjacent to the HO's drive way.

The point of the hill broke away and came down. That left a 25' shear drop at the top cause all the dirt came off the face. We came back and fixed that. I wish I had done it a little different now but we litererally lifted up by hand.

I noted at the time that top retaining wall was coming down. Called the city and stuff but they did not listen. About 2 years later the top wall came down but most of my stuff held. Kind of hard for it to hold up with all that coming down on it. The HO said the city did recall my warnings LOL.

I would suggest these anchors over the rebar.


http://www.platipus-anchors.com/

I might look and see if I can find some photos for you.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:37 PM
That mini carries how much rock?

icex
12-30-2012, 03:38 PM
It's a 304CCR with a 28" bucket

Materials cost $20,000. I am estimating labor around $20-22k. Thats what I'm trying to figure out. Its about a month long project.

xc2010
12-30-2012, 03:43 PM
Not to sound like a smart-ass, but this thread shows you have no idea what you, your employees, and your current equipment set are capable of. No one has an identical set up so no one but you can determine how to bid a job. Even if you found two people with the same amount of employees and same equipment, they do not necessarily have the same overhead, profit margins etc.. You are the only one that can accurately determine what a job will take.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:44 PM
Is there a way to cut a road / path down there and get a bigger skid steer in there?
You might spend a day or two doing it but save 5 on the back side.

icex
12-30-2012, 03:44 PM
I have some pictures of the project. I'll upload them. Hold on.

xc2010
12-30-2012, 03:46 PM
I have some pictures of the project. I'll upload them. Hold on.

Then it should be simple (Estimated hours to complete X Labor rate)=Fixed cost

Edit: Fixed labor cost

1idejim
12-30-2012, 03:46 PM
I have done some work with them, last time was 25 years back i think. it boils down to a lot of hand work.

Gabions used to come in pieces and you assembled them with no.9 galv wire.

The cobble had to be hand sorted and placed where there was basicaly no voids.

I would use a demo hammer with a rod driver to put the 7/8" steel in.

The hand labor can be the killer.

If you have any inspections/inspectors they can make or break these jobs.

I dont remember what size we used offhand
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Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:47 PM
The 304CCR is a decent sized machine. I would look at breaking up that cinder block wall and using it as part of the gabion fill.

icex
12-30-2012, 03:50 PM
The 304CCR is a decent sized machine. I would look at breaking up that cinder block wall and using it as part of the gabion fill.
The pictures won't upload for some reason, but the engineer says gabion rock (4-6 inchs) must be used.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:50 PM
I have done some work with them, last time was 25 years back i think. it boils down to a lot of hand work.

Gabions used to come in pieces and you assembled them with no.9 galv wire.

The cobble had to be hand sorted and placed where there was basicaly no voids.

I would use a demo hammer with a rod driver to put the 7/8" steel in.

The hand labor can be the killer.

If you have any inspections/inspectors they can make or break these jobs.

I dont remember what size we used offhand
Posted via Mobile Device

I could not imagine some of those gabion cages I have seen being hand filled.

icex
12-30-2012, 03:54 PM
I could not imagine some of those gabion cages I have seen being hand filled.

The engineer said we should fill the gabion baskets by hand, but I do not see it possible to move 208 ton of a rock by hand.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:55 PM
The pictures won't upload for some reason, but the engineer says gabion rock (4-6 inchs) must be used.

It will be an interesting project. Keep in mind the risk reward aspect. More risk the more reward you need. Do not bid this as straight hours. I am sure there will be some site restoration needed even if it is not in the contract.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 03:57 PM
If you use those super bags, you can open the bottom and kind of spread the rock around. You can then sort through moving the rocks around to different baskets. Repeat until all are full.

1idejim
12-30-2012, 04:02 PM
The engineer said we should fill the gabion baskets by hand, but I do not see it possible to move 208 ton of a rock by hand.

I think you will find him right. And as i said the inspector will play a part as there may be an air space limitation per basket.
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icex
12-30-2012, 04:24 PM
I think you will find him right. And as i said the inspector will play a part as there may be an air space limitation per basket.
Posted via Mobile Device

We plan on putting them in with the excavator and having someone in the basket move the rocks into place. I believe it's a monthlong project which is why I am estimating 20k+ in labor

alldayrj
12-30-2012, 04:25 PM
I would throw a bucket or two of rock in the basket with the mini ex then sort them in by hand. Rinse and repeat. Definitely up the reward. The only thing worse than figuring your way through a new project is doing it for free or a loss.
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alldayrj
12-30-2012, 04:25 PM
We plan on putting them in with the excavator and having someone in the basket move the rocks into place. I believe it's a monthlong project which is why I am estimating 20k+ in labor

Damn great minds think alike
Posted via Mobile Device
Posted via Mobile Device
Posted via Mobile Device

Duekster
12-30-2012, 04:27 PM
Got a call from a engineer on a gabion wall project. I wanted to see if anyone has experience pricing these and offer advice.

I have to remove a 50ft long, 15ft tall cinderblock wall thats fell into the creek and haul it off, build a 51ft long, 6ft wide pad using compacted 57 gravel, install 51ft of gabion baskets, drive 51 peices of #7 rebar in the first row of baskets (17 baskets, 3 rebar each), tie all baskets together, install geotextile behind the baskets and backfill with 57 gravel.

I estimated 208 tons of gabion rock (4-6 inch), and 200 tons of 57 gravel for the base, and backfill.

After finished with that, cover the top of the baskets with topsoil, grade and grass.

What would you charge laborwise? I have a number in my head but want to see what everyone thinks. I will have 3-4 helpers.

How deep are the gabions 6 feet? are they stair stepped up to 15 feet high?

Some of that geotextile is expensive but will hold a lot of earth if you anchor it as I mentioned. I know it is more than the engineer asked for but I would not want a claim on my insurance.

icex
12-30-2012, 04:29 PM
How deep are the gabions 6 feet? are they stair stepped?

Some of that geotextile is expensive but will hold a lot of earth if you anchor it as I mentioned. I know it is more than the engineer asked for but I would not want a claim on my insurance.

They don't call for the geotextile to be anchored. It just says to "wrap" the backfil in it which is placing it and then pouring the backfil in and compacting it.

The baskets are 3ft deep.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 04:31 PM
They don't call for the geotextile to be anchored. It just says to "wrap" the backfil in it which is placing it and then pouring the backfil in and compacting it.

The baskets are 3ft deep.

I understand, just saying it would be great insurance that the gabion wall stays.

Jim mentioned inspection. I am sure the engineer will be there. Are there places where work stops for inspection? If so what window does he have to come out?

icex
12-30-2012, 04:39 PM
I understand, just saying it would be great insurance that the gabion wall stays.

Jim mentioned inspection. I am sure the engineer will be there. Are there places where work stops for inspection? If so what window does he have to come out?

The engineer mentioned in his plans that we should have their company there to monitor wall placement. They are calling for grout to fill the open voids in the gabion rock, but all I can see that doing is trapping water behind the wall.

1idejim
12-30-2012, 04:56 PM
I understand, just saying it would be great insurance that the gabion wall stays.

Jim mentioned inspection. I am sure the engineer will be there. Are there places where work stops for inspection? If so what window does he have to come out?

That is dependant upon the authorities, i assume that the RE will be on-site as well as fish and wildlife due to the creek.

I have been on many jobs where the inspectors and interested agency representives out number the working force. Normally work doesn't cease with an RE on-site.

All of the information you need should be in the bid package you should have received from the engineer.
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icex
12-30-2012, 05:01 PM
all i got was a report lol
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Duekster
12-30-2012, 05:02 PM
One section of that hill seemed to weep a lot. We drove in some of those anchors with tubing on it to control the weep.

I wonder that cause the first failure, current from the stream washing out the base or weeping and force behind it.

earthmover
12-30-2012, 05:35 PM
I have some experience doing gabion walls. I just bid on a gabion wall that was 20' high and 100' long. The bottom baskets were 9' for three courses and stepped back 1'-6" for the last 3 courses. The original concrete wall failed and had to be demoed. Behind the wall the soil had to be sloped at 1:1 slope and backfilled with #57 stone.

Gabions are very labor intensive. You need to assemble the baskets in the field and clamp the together. The face of the gabion stones should be hand stacked to give the face a clean look with little voids. Then the rest of the stones need to be moved around by hand to remove voids to minimize settling. Also, the baskets needed to be filled at 1/3 intervals and cross tied for reinforcing.

I think that the 304 will be a little small I would at least use a 312. You need reach to fill the baskets and you don't want to put the machine tracking back and forth right up against the back of the gabion wall. Plus, you need to excavate material from behind the existing block wall and load it out if you need to backfill with #57. Also, I figured in cutting in a bench behind the gabion wall to run the machine to fill the baskets and the site was very tight so, I figured using a loader to feed the excavator because I couldn't get the loads of stone close enough.

Without seeing the site and plans it's hard to know exactly what your up against but hopefully this information helps.

AEL
12-30-2012, 08:16 PM
I did alot of gabion last year on a erosion scar project i did for a developer. I hope your not charging just 20k for a month long job...plus 20 k for materials. These jobs can be very labour intensive , and working in tight access areas the right equipment can make or break the job. There are so many variables that can make a large impact on price. What is the distance from where you plan on stockpiling the material to where you are going to set up your mini to fill the baskets? What type of erosion control measures do you have to have in place? Are you going to need a filter bag for the water discharge from the pump?

icex
12-30-2012, 08:19 PM
I did alot of gabion last year on a erosion scar project i did for a developer. I hope your not charging just 20k for a month long job...plus 20 k for materials. These jobs can be very labour intensive , and working in tight access areas the right equipment can make or break the job. There are so many variables that can make a large impact on price. What is the distance from where you plan on stockpiling the material to where you are going to set up your mini to fill the baskets? What type of erosion control measures do you have to have in place? Are you going to need a filter bag for the water discharge from the pump?

Materials come to $19,495 not including taxs and the rebar. I am trying to find a price on the rebar.

I am in the range of about $22,000-26,000 for labor. That includes installing the baskets, removal of the old wall, etc.

As far as distance for the material, it's very close access. 50 ft or so.

AEL
12-30-2012, 08:26 PM
What about removal of the old concrete? thats 2 20yd boxes you will fill with concrete. How are you going to get the concrete out to your loading area and the gabion in from there?

icex
12-30-2012, 08:29 PM
What about removal of the old concrete? thats 2 20yd boxes you will fill with concrete. How are you going to get the concrete out to your loading area and the gabion in from there?

Our plan is to build us a road down into the creek (with a permit from DNR of course) and break up the concrete wall in sections (it's cinderblock wall built 30+ years ago) and lay it on the bank, and then probaly use to skid to move it out of the way so we can haul it off in our truck.

I will have 2 labor's putting the baskets together and then setting them into place with the excavator.

AEL
12-30-2012, 08:38 PM
Will a 4 tonne machine be enough to lift the baskets? I think a bigger excavator might be in order...

icex
12-30-2012, 08:41 PM
Will a 4 tonne machine be enough to lift the baskets? I think a bigger excavator might be in order...

I've used it to lift them before. We will put them in place and then fill them. It calls for 3 #7 rebar in each bottom basket to be driven down into the ground 3 ft.

Duekster
12-30-2012, 08:48 PM
Be sure to take some photos and keep up to date as this project progresses.

icex
12-30-2012, 08:54 PM
I will upload some pictures on photobucket tonight.

bobcatexc
12-31-2012, 12:27 PM
I've done gabion baskets, there no fun!! They are very labor intensive, make sure you rent a air gun to hog tie ring the basket together, that will help speed up quite a bit. We always place the stone into the basket with an excavator or I've used a backhoe, then hand place to fill in the voids and like someone mention you'll have to cross tie them in 1/3rd intervals or halfs. Small crow bar will become your labors favorite tool to pook rocks into place and help close the baskets together. I'm surprised they call out #57s that have to be compacted, we always backfill with gabion rock so you don't have to compact between the wall and dirt slope, cut the slope as tight as you can so it don't eat up to much backfill.

I'm sure a Cat 304 will work but I've never used anything small than a 308 or Kom PC88. You don't want to much machine as you want to beable to place the bucket down into the basket. We always dipped the rock out a rock box on a trailer or out of the back of Tri-axle. This will help save on rock and not get mud into the baskets and leave alot cleanier jobsite.

icex
12-31-2012, 04:40 PM
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0265_zps4db46bb0.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0264_zps411a59aa.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0263_zps56d2e41a.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0262_zps27e0cbab.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0261_zps3f2d9be5.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0257_zps72f91515.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0256_zpsae3236d6.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0255_zpsccbbe588.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0254_zps1b0a2ed4.jpg

excav8ter
12-31-2012, 04:42 PM
I did on Gabion basket wall job, for a damn spill way. Used my kobelco 135sr to set and fill baskets. Used a Takeuchi TL130 to fill a bedding box (or stone boat) and dug the 4"-8" limestone out from there. I think we built 23 baskets of varying sizes,
3◊3◊12 / 3◊3◊9 / 3◊3◊6....if memory serves me correct, it took about 45 minutes for one guy to build one basket. We set the baskets and filled them in about 2 days time, with2 laborers and 2 operators. But I was working from above the baskets. We had a Geo-textile fabric behind the baskets. We then poured 26 yards of concrete (flowable fill?) behind the baskets and filter cloth to to fill in the gaps behind the wall where we could not get the baskets tight to the vertical areas under the spill way.

norsky
12-31-2012, 10:33 PM
I have done some work with them, last time was 25 years back i think. it boils down to a lot of hand work.

Gabions used to come in pieces and you assembled them with no.9 galv wire.

The cobble had to be hand sorted and placed where there was basicaly no voids.

I would use a demo hammer with a rod driver to put the 7/8" steel in.

The hand labor can be the killer.

If you have any inspections/inspectors they can make or break these jobs.

I dont remember what size we used offhand
Posted via Mobile Device we used excavators to put rock down by the baskets and then hand placed the rock. very high labor. have to put the baskets together by hand. also used #9 wire to tie together. like you said the inspectors can make it a very long and unpleasant job. we usually did well on these jobs because nobody likes doing them

Duekster
12-31-2012, 11:44 PM
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0265_zps4db46bb0.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0264_zps411a59aa.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0263_zps56d2e41a.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0262_zps27e0cbab.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0261_zps3f2d9be5.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0257_zps72f91515.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0256_zpsae3236d6.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0255_zpsccbbe588.jpg
http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag139/icex2014/IMG_0254_zps1b0a2ed4.jpg

Put some money in for fishing gear and beers for you and the workers. :cool2:

KrayzKajun
01-01-2013, 12:17 AM
Will you be building a temporary barrier to divert the water flow away from the work area?
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icex
01-01-2013, 12:26 AM
Will you be building a temporary barrier to divert the water flow away from the work area?
Posted via Mobile Device

Yes, or we may rent a 2500gpm pump, damn it up and divert the creek down stream 50 foot away from the work area.

AEL
01-01-2013, 12:08 PM
Will the engineer allow you to pump that much water as apposed to building a temporary stream by pass? What time of the year will the work be done? I would recommend building some type of rock/bedding box to place the material in to save on spoils .
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icex
01-01-2013, 12:11 PM
Will the engineer allow you to pump that much water as apposed to building a temporary stream by pass? What time of the year will the work be done? I would recommend building some type of rock/bedding box to place the material in to save on spoils .
Posted via Mobile Device

The engineer isent going to be watching the project. I am looking into differnt ways to divert the water instead of pumping it, such as berming up the soil already blocking the creek more.

As far as when the work will be done, I am not sure as it is a insurance job.

RussellB
01-01-2013, 12:50 PM
haven't read the entire thread but I did oversee several gabion installations in the 90's while working for a utility. The Corp of Engineers stopped us from installing them in stream beds. Said they trap fingerlings and made us switch to large natural (to the area of restoration) rock. Costs of materials was higher but labor was lower. As far as diverting stream flows, pumping was a last resort due to displacement of sediments. The Corp much preferred diverting the flows to a narrower channel. We utilized cloth and rock for stream diversions.

excav8ter
01-01-2013, 01:01 PM
Just curious....but does it have to be a Gabion wall?

icex
01-01-2013, 01:02 PM
Just curious....but does it have to be a Gabion wall?

That's what the engineer wants.

Keep in mind that the insurance company hired the engineer for consultation. It's a homeowner, not commercial property.

AEL
01-01-2013, 01:07 PM
I dont think that berming up the channel with dirt is going to work. The creek seems to have prettty good flow and would wash out the dirt quite easily , plus you will be introducing a large amount of sediment to the watercourse. Remember just because the engineer isnt watching the project doesnt mean the epa or some conservation authority cant show up on site and issue some fines or even shut the job down.

I have always used large rocks to narrow the channel down , and in some cases have used sand bags filled with clear pea stone.

I dont know about your state but here in Ontario if you dont take proper precautions ( siltation, erosion control , dewatering, measures) you can have your job shut down and fined as much as $2.5 million

AEL
01-01-2013, 01:09 PM
Mabee try running the idea by the engineer of re-sloping the creek banks , and stabilizing them with rip rap and filter cloth.

icex
01-01-2013, 01:10 PM
I dont think that berming up the channel with dirt is going to work. The creek seems to have prettty good flow and would wash out the dirt quite easily , plus you will be introducing a large amount of sediment to the watercourse. Remember just because the engineer isnt watching the project doesnt mean the epa or some conservation authority cant show up on site and issue some fines or even shut the job down.

I have always used large rocks to narrow the channel down , and in some cases have used sand bags filled with clear pea stone.

I dont know about your state but here in Ontario if you dont take proper precautions ( siltation, erosion control , dewatering, measures) you can have your job shut down and fined as much as $2.5 million

It's not realy a issue here, however the only reason we'll be touching the creek water is to remove the old wall that fell into the creek. The gabion baskets are going to be used for erosion control along with geotextile to hold the dirt.

excav8ter
01-01-2013, 01:10 PM
That's what the engineer wants.

Keep in mind that the insurance company hired the engineer for consultation. It's a homeowner, not commercial property.

I was curious if it was a space thing or not?
What about removing the block wall and the vertical slopes, then lay down 2 layers of the heavier geotextile fabric , and then cover it with 18"-24" limestone, then fill in the gaps with a 4"◊8" and 8"◊12" mix of limestone?

We don't see very much Gabion wall work around us, I think mostly because of having such a vertical drop near a body of water, even though the stream is not very deep. They only do it where there is not enough room to shape a new slope, and place rip-rap on it.

icex
01-01-2013, 01:11 PM
Mabee try running the idea by the engineer of re-sloping the creek banks , and stabilizing them with rip rap and filter cloth.


It was mentioned but they do beleive that gabion baskets are more suited. From what I understand the property was filled in more years ago and theres alot of pressure that was behind the old retaining wall.

icex
01-01-2013, 01:14 PM
I was curious if it was a space thing or not?
What about removing the block wall and the vertical slopes, then lay down 2 layers of the heavier geotextile fabric , and then cover it with 18"-24" limestone, then fill in the gaps with a 4"◊8" and 8"◊12" mix of limestone?

We don't see very much Gabion wall work around us, I think mostly because of having such a vertical drop near a body of water, even though the stream is not very deep. They only do it where there is not enough room to shape a new slope, and place rip-rap on it.

I done a project last year similar to what your talking about, we put in 20" rocks in the bank and concreted everything into place. Has not budged since. That was a fun project. We were going to use gabion baskets on that project until the homeowner saw the price and compared it to rocks and concrete.

Gabion baskets are popular around here, especialy on creek banks.

excav8ter
01-01-2013, 01:15 PM
It was mentioned but they do beleive that gabion baskets are more suited. From what I understand the property was filled in more years ago and theres alot of pressure that was behind the old retaining wall.


Missed that post..... :hammerhead:

P.Services
01-01-2013, 01:36 PM
Doesnt look like a hard job to do at all.

Number one, you arnt going to pump that creek. If you think 2,500 gpm pump will keep up your in for a MASSIVE surprise. All you need is a floating sediment break wall out in the water. If you must have a dry work area then your needing to use a portable dam system. Google dam-it-dams, he can ship you a dam to rent. Figure 5k if you need one.

Knock that dirt down behind the wall so its all a gentle slope and gives you good access behind it.

Rip the concrete out with the exc. and use a CTL to bring it up and out.

I cant see that job being more than 2 weeks if that. As long as you have two guys on machines and 3 or 4 laborers.

icex
01-01-2013, 02:51 PM
Doesnt look like a hard job to do at all.

Number one, you arnt going to pump that creek. If you think 2,500 gpm pump will keep up your in for a MASSIVE surprise. All you need is a floating sediment break wall out in the water. If you must have a dry work area then your needing to use a portable dam system. Google dam-it-dams, he can ship you a dam to rent. Figure 5k if you need one.

Knock that dirt down behind the wall so its all a gentle slope and gives you good access behind it.

Rip the concrete out with the exc. and use a CTL to bring it up and out.

I cant see that job being more than 2 weeks if that. As long as you have two guys on machines and 3 or 4 laborers.

We estimate around 2-3 weeks. We will have 2-3 laborers working. Just depends on what the insurance decides to do.