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View Full Version : who drops a bill off after every mow.


Amco Landscaping
01-13-2013, 09:28 PM
I was thinking about giving my guys bills for each lawn they mow and have them drop off with customer after every cut. what do you think?

trock
01-13-2013, 09:31 PM
What if they are not home? Seems like alot of extra work.... I invoice out once a month works good.

weeze
01-13-2013, 09:31 PM
i do that on one commerical account i have. i just walk in and hand it to the secretary. pretty easy to do. no need to pay for postage lol.

JB1
01-13-2013, 09:35 PM
That sounds like a pain in the butt.

Amco Landscaping
01-13-2013, 09:37 PM
this year money is going to be hard, so i was thinking of instead of waiting to get paid. I used to send out invoice every 2 cuts, i would just drop off after each one.

grandview (2006)
01-13-2013, 09:48 PM
If things are that tight ,you better re think your business plan. I think you'll spend more time chasing your money that way.

KS_Grasscutter
01-14-2013, 12:51 AM
If money is tight why would you want to spend four times as much as you should on printing invoices??

Darryl G
01-14-2013, 02:10 AM
I bill monthly but for one-time work will collect at completion. I have started sending out invoices after the last scheduled cut of the month rather than waiting til the end to bill everyone. I still put the 1st of the following month as the invoice date so it's still due when it normally would be, but a lot of people will pay them when they get them anyway. Weekly billing would create a lot more accounting work for me that I don't want to deal with. I make my money working on properties, not in my office.

weeze
01-14-2013, 01:16 PM
if you bill no need to do it weekly. i just hand them the bill once a month. most of my customers pay with cash or a check and those pay every cut. that's the best way to me. you get your money right away and don't have to wait on it. i just go to the bank at the end of each week to make my deposit. i only have a few that want to be billed monthly.

jsslawncare
01-14-2013, 03:12 PM
I was thinking about giving my guys bills for each lawn they mow and have them drop off with customer after every cut. what do you think?

What were you doing before?

zechstoker
01-14-2013, 03:16 PM
My customers would be irate if I handed them a bill every week. Plus, as stated above, it's going to raise costs with 4 or 5 times the paper, envelopes, and printer ink/toner being used for billing. One-time services get billed upon completion of a job, but we send everyone an invoice for the month on the first working day each month.

branchoutshrub
01-14-2013, 06:02 PM
Invoice once per month otherwise you waste so much time with quickbooks etc...

wbw
01-14-2013, 08:12 PM
I make my money working on properties, not in my office.

The guys that make the most money make it in the office, not working on properties. Just sayin'
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Darryl G
01-14-2013, 08:27 PM
I did the office thing for 15 years...I do this because I enjoy being in the field. Maybe when I get too old to do this, but for now I enjoy busting my butt, lol.

wbw
01-14-2013, 08:55 PM
I did the office thing for 15 years...I do this because I enjoy being in the field. Maybe when I get too old to do this, but for now I enjoy busting my butt, lol.

Good for you. Nothing better than enjoying what you do.
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Five Points
01-14-2013, 09:29 PM
i changed to seasonal agreements or contracts, however you want to call them. its over seven months May to November. I bill first of May and ask for payment by end of the month. That way I am basically paid for the months work at the end of that month. Worked really well. many pay right away others middle of month, some end of the month.

Seems to be chqs in the mail everyday. Best of all I never second guess myself. I just cut it, it always looks better after its cut.:canadaflag:

Weekend cut easymoney
01-14-2013, 09:49 PM
I cut that crap out years ago--I hated processing all those checks--
went to contracts for 95 percent of clients and email bills through Qb--not gonna look back--
my favorite is someone telling me they never received an invoice and me looking at my QB billing solutions tracking software that shows me if they have viewed it or not...and then telling them that I will resend, someone viewed the invoice on xx date--

accepting credit cards has also helped make things lots easier, though can be rather costly in the end--i get folks to fill out a credit card authorization form and then charge their card AUTOmatically in QB and then download the data --easy stuff

cpllawncare
01-14-2013, 10:05 PM
I have my maintence invoicing split up A-M by last name goes out the 15th the rest go out the end of the month. I don't do one time cuts, but design install jobs are the normal half up front and the balance due upon completion. The thing I found out about e-mailing invoices is a lot people don't check their e mails and I was constantly sending reminders out, I want to do the cc thing this year I think it should be a requirement for renters

JContracting
01-15-2013, 06:02 AM
Every client will be on a full service maintenance contract or if they just want to do fert/weed control, those services are billed the day they're done unless prepaid. I HATED having people try to cheap out and want to skip mowing for a week. With a monthly price, the money is always received and the client is almost always happy. Win, win.

If its an install, 50% up front received and then we begin and then the remaining 50% upon completion.

The only thing that would be per visit is plowing.

Roger
01-15-2013, 09:46 AM
..... The thing I found out about e-mailing invoices is a lot people don't check their e mails and I was constantly sending reminders out, .....

A couple of years ago, I worked at migrating my customers to e-invoices, rather than paper invoice. At that time, I was using USPS for all delivery.

I've learned the same thing as you -- e-Invoices get lost in the junk of e-mail IN boxes. We might see lots of junk mail in our mailboxes at the end of the driveway, but the IN box in our e-mail system is often clogged with much more junk. The e-Invoices are getting lost in the shuffle.

The idea sounds great -- quick, easy, a few clicks, and out the door. But, the reality is that the customers are not getting the Invoices as reliably as the USPS, or hand delivery. I am going to try to move more customers back to paper.

I invoice once per month at the end of the month. This last season, I've delivered them on the last visit of the month, in an obvious place that they frequent, or a place we've agreed upon. Often I use masking tape to attach to a back door, storm door, or other obvious place. This seems to work well.

lawnkingforever
01-15-2013, 01:05 PM
A couple of years ago, I worked at migrating my customers to e-invoices, rather than paper invoice. At that time, I was using USPS for all delivery.

I've learned the same thing as you -- e-Invoices get lost in the junk of e-mail IN boxes. We might see lots of junk mail in our mailboxes at the end of the driveway, but the IN box in our e-mail system is often clogged with much more junk. The e-Invoices are getting lost in the shuffle.

The idea sounds great -- quick, easy, a few clicks, and out the door. But, the reality is that the customers are not getting the Invoices as reliably as the USPS, or hand delivery. I am going to try to move more customers back to paper.

I invoice once per month at the end of the month. This last season, I've delivered them on the last visit of the month, in an obvious place that they frequent, or a place we've agreed upon. Often I use masking tape to attach to a back door, storm door, or other obvious place. This seems to work well.


Agreed. I started moving some customers over to emailing of their invoices. Mistake on my part. I spent way too much time chasing payments. Most of my clients are younger and higher end homeowners, so I thought it would work. With mailing invoices I receive most payments within my 14 day terms except for a few stragglers. Everyone is back on paper invoices for next year.
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