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View Full Version : Frozen base rock installed, now what?


mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 12:34 AM
We started a paver driveway this week and had material freeze. We excavated past the frozen layer of soil, and covered sub-base with geotextile. It snowed and froze over night, as well as the base rock. After breaking through the crust of the rock and we installed the unfrozen rock, compacting in 2-4" layers completely breaking up the clumps of frozen material as we went (not an easy task).

After doing alot of reading, I'm seeing this was probably a dumb mistake.

Now what? Do I leave it until spring to make sure things don't settle and re-compact with a big roller? Or because base was workable and I packed in 2-4" lifts is it ok to keep going?

DVS Hardscaper
01-16-2013, 08:38 AM
You're done. Ground can't be frozen, heaves and expands. Should not have started on frozen ground. Gotta wait until it thaws.
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mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 04:22 PM
I was afraid of that, but kinda figured. Thank you! Thankfully the customer was very understanding.

DVS Hardscaper
01-16-2013, 04:37 PM
LOL - how did it go " mrs jones I must apologize for my lack of competency. I didn't know that we can't prepare the aggregate base on frozen soil......"?

Now - we do work year round. But if the ground is frozen we don't do any base prep/installation.


.
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mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 06:18 PM
Something like that

jbailey52
01-16-2013, 06:35 PM
Ha! That's it?? I would have loved to see the look in their face. "sorry, we started this, but can't finish your torn out driveway, but have a nice winter!"

mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 06:49 PM
It was new construction and they didn't have a driveway anyway. We basically prepared the base and got the driveway back to where they had it (gravel). I explained the situation and the timing of the weather (abnormal above freezing weather which enabled us to actually start) and then dropping before we could finish the base.

jbailey52
01-16-2013, 07:00 PM
Is that 'striving for excellence'?

mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 08:11 PM
Well lets see, being honest with them, admitting my mistake, explaining what went wrong (which wasn't entirely a lack of knowledge on our part), giving them all their options (which included losing the job) and not charging them anything...under the circumstances, I'd say yes.

Gilmore.Landscaping
01-16-2013, 08:48 PM
Well lets see, being honest with them, admitting my mistake, explaining what went wrong (which wasn't entirely a lack of knowledge on our part), giving them all their options (which included losing the job) and not charging them anything...under the circumstances, I'd say yes.

+1 definitely the right thing to do.

There always comes that point in the season when you have to use experience to know when to stop. Many contractors out there would have rushed through the job and gotten their money and would have been nowhere to be found come spring.

Well done!

mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 09:01 PM
+1 definitely the right thing to do.

There always comes that point in the season when you have to use experience to know when to stop. Many contractors out there would have rushed through the job and gotten their money and would have been nowhere to be found come spring.

Well done!

Thank you! Definitely lesson learned and thankfully without much damage other than some pride...which never hurts to lose a little of.
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GreenLight
01-16-2013, 09:07 PM
Well lets see, being honest with them, admitting my mistake, explaining what went wrong (which wasn't entirely a lack of knowledge on our part), giving them all their options (which included losing the job) and not charging them anything...under the circumstances, I'd say yes.


You seem level headed and aware. I don't know of any contractor I have ever met that doesn't have a horror story or 10 about learning very basic things the hard way (and costing themselves a lot of money in the process). No matter your level of education, inexperience in certain areas will often times slap you around. The great part is you learned a lesson you will never repeat. It's going to happen, roll with the punches and move on with a smile on your face.

mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 09:11 PM
Lol i have my share :) failure is the best teacher
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mrusk
01-16-2013, 09:48 PM
I think the job will be okay. You said you removed the frozen layer of soil on day 2. Then you put down stone. Then you removed the frozen layer of stone the next day. If you never installed stone on frozen ground you will be fine. The key to winter work is get the base in and level before it freezes. Doing as little as covering an area with a tarp can prevent frost.

mirrorlandscapes
01-16-2013, 09:57 PM
Should have been more clear. Dug out base on day 1 and had base rock in piles waiting to be installed. everything froze overnight (unless geotextile kept subbase from freezing). Broke the piles of rock up and installed unfrozen rock probably on frozen ground. :( never checked under geo. Tarp would have been great idea thanks :) i didnt think that would prevent freezing. I'll know for next time
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DVS Hardscaper
01-16-2013, 11:32 PM
You seem level headed and aware. .

Yeah, I tried to mess with him and he took it all in stride :)
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