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View Full Version : Filling in pool - need educated


swanny
02-01-2013, 08:00 AM
Customer has a 16x45 pool that's 9' deep sloped to 4' deep that he wants me to fill in. Has 4' concrete walk around it.

I'm figuring I'll have to take my saw and cut a 3x3 square out of the deep part to allow for drainage. Adequate enough? Too big, too small?

Anyone ever done these? Not sure how tough it's going to be to lift up the sidewalk and neatly stack it in so it won't settle, but that's the plan.

Access is easy...guess I'll fill the voids with stone, bring in topsoil, rake it out and seed/straw the area. I'm thinking between $3 to $4k for the job. Too expensive or cheap?

Thanks for the input!

whiffyspark
02-01-2013, 08:08 AM
I did one for 5k. Biggest mistake I ever made

I will never do another one
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alldayrj
02-01-2013, 08:18 AM
My dad used to do them for free if the people werent in a rush. Free dumps and machine storage! But i would make sure you write NO GUARANTEE AGAINST SETTLING. I would perforate the whole bottom and knock the sides in too. Compact every 6" minimum and if possible let it rain on it before you're done
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Landrus2
02-01-2013, 08:33 AM
My dad used to do them for free if the people werent in a rush. Free dumps and machine storage! But i would make sure you write NO GUARANTEE AGAINST SETTLING. I would perforate the whole bottom and knock the sides in too. Compact every 6" minimum and if possible let it rain on it before you're done
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You covered all bases and yes it will take long time for it to settle :waving:

Krafty
02-01-2013, 03:12 PM
We do a few every year. We normally just punch alot of holes in the bottom with a breaker. Bust up the edges and throw concrete in the bottom. Put a layer or two of fabric and cover with soil. Have not had one settel yet.

swanny
02-02-2013, 08:50 AM
Thanks for the info.

Wiffy - care to share any details about the one you did? You've got me curious.

whiffyspark
02-02-2013, 02:31 PM
Really bad timing and turned into a mess. Project took over two months. It would rain for days at a time and take a week to dry out.

It's one job I wish I passed on. Granted, I would do it again
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bighornjd
02-02-2013, 05:21 PM
I did one a few years ago about that same size. It had a metal frame around the edge about 3 ft down then a vinyl liner with sand underneath. No problem with drainage once the vinyl and steel was out. Had a sidewalk all the way around and block retaining wall on one end that came out as well. Layed the slabs and block flat in layers and used the gravel and sand from around the pool and what was back filling the retaining wall to fill in the voids. This brought me up to about 2 ft from the top before adding any regular dirt. Customer was in no hurry so we waited a couple weeks and let that get rained on a couple times and settle. Then we cut back the bank where the retaining wall had been to a gentle slope and used the dirt from that cut to fill it the rest of the way up to almost level, compacting about every six inches as we went. Graded off halfway smooth but left a slight dip to hold rainwater rather than let it run off and let that settle over winter about six months. Had experienced some slight settling come spring but honestly not much. Added several loads of aggregate fill to top of that in spring to bring about level and continued to allow to settle. No noticeable settling the rest of that summer. That fall we built up the whole area with about a foot of crusher run. The following spring we built a 32x48 pole barn garage right over top of where the pool was. The building straddles the old pool both ways so all the poles and footers are on virgin ground. We put in 5" of fiberglass reinforced concrete as well as wire mesh for the floor a just to be safe. The building has been up almost 2 years now. I was there a few weeks ago doing some other work and went in to check out the floor and there isn't a single hairline crack anywhere. I was really leery about that job at first but we took our time and didn't cut any corners and it turned out well. That is the only pool fill in I've ever done. I think the biggest thing is just allow it time to settle. I don't care how well it's compacted, there will be at least some noticeable settling. Just allow for it and make sure the customer understands it and it shouldn't be a big deal.
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turboawd
02-02-2013, 08:44 PM
Really bad timing and turned into a mess. Project took over two months. It would rain for days at a time and take a week to dry out.

It's one job I wish I passed on. Granted, I would do it again
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should have punched more holes into bottom :hammerhead:

ksss
02-02-2013, 09:18 PM
If you properly compact with acceptable fill, it will not settle. If it does settle someone %ucked up. There is really no excuse for the area settling. UNLESS the owner is not willing to pay for compaction or structural fill, then certainly the area will settle over time.

whiffyspark
02-02-2013, 09:21 PM
should have punched more holes into bottom :hammerhead:

That wasn't the issue, our clay holds rain water horribly. It made it a pain to grade. Not to mention a 3 ft diameter oak on top of a hill that I couldn't cut into. So the hill sloped back to the house. I ended up cutting a swale and installing a drain

I HATE clay
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Kepple Services
02-02-2013, 10:58 PM
I have filled a few in also... the largest took 28 laods to fill it... It was at an apartment complex. Looks good to this day. Cut large holes in the bottom of the deep end, cut the sides down 2' and pulled them in as we filled it. The deck we hauled away as the concrete dump was not that far away. Took about 4 days to complete as I couldnt get the truck to the pool and had to use a T300 bobcat to move ALL the dirt to the pool. After we filled it in, threw some sod on it and called it good.. never settled in we filled it in little by little and tracked it in the whole way..

Clarkscape
02-02-2013, 11:31 PM
This video may be helpful..
http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=p2GpVxRpYNE&feature=relmfu

meets1
02-02-2013, 11:50 PM
I have done a few. Punched hole with breaker from backhoe. Then started filling and tamping every 6-8 inches. The last one we did we hauled in dirt the last six inches and the burned dirt up and around and landscaped the entire pool. Looks cool!

swanny
02-03-2013, 08:49 AM
Thanks for the info. I did watch about 6 pool demo's on Youtube that were helpful. They've been customers for twenty some years...think I'll give them a ballpark price since I haven't done one before. I'm sure both parties will be happy after it's done.

whiffyspark
02-03-2013, 09:05 AM
It's not a hard job by any means. I used an e42 with a breaker. And a t110-190 for moving full dirt. I have a picture thread here somewhere to get you an idea.

The easiest way is to bust one wall down and walk the ex in to the pool. Then pull the walls into you. Make sure power is taken out of the breaker. We had a cut off saw on site to help with stubborn rebar. It's a simple job just take your time.

Fill dirt can be found for free. It rained so much during my project we hardly used a compactor except for against the will. The machines compacted the middle from running in and out.
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alldayrj
02-03-2013, 11:44 AM
I like the part where the homeowner paid someone to fill the pool, then paid tom to dig it up and fill it again!
If you can back the dump truck up to the pool, be safe and have a reliable spotter. Pops stood his c60 up on the tailgate in the deep end of a pool. Luckily we had a concrete truck on site and tugged it out.
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swanny
04-16-2013, 07:19 PM
Did that pool job this month. Took a couple hundred tons of fill...more than I estimated (guess I compacted it better than I thought I would), but my friend came out of a commercial job he was doing for $70 a tandem.

Busted up the concrete around the edges with the Takkie and some heavy forks, then stacked it in the bottom. Left the 4' metal liner around perimeter, but took the top edge and rolled it over like a sardine can with the bucket to get it below grade. Bottom was a vinyl liner on top of compacted sand.

Used some Power Tan to fill the rest of the way, and run the landscape rake. That machine has some power, but it's loud inside the cab - even with earplugs and earmuffs. Can't see very well out of those machines either.

Thanks again for the advice. Worked out well.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/barndwellers_md/004_zps4183739f.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/barndwellers_md/003-2_zpsab4817d8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/barndwellers_md/005_zps6dfbd509.jpg

Dually00-00
04-16-2013, 08:50 PM
This Is one I did a few years back. Punched a bunch of holes in the bottom, took down 2 foot of wall and bent re-bar over with the breaker. Then pushed sidewalk in . We compacted it and it took around 200 yards of fill. Then 4'' of top soil. Think we charged 7000.00 .
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