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JimB
02-07-2003, 08:46 PM
i GOT A BIG JOB SET UP FOR EARLY SPRING, A CUSTOMER WANTS ME TO PLANT PAKASANDRA'S COVERING AN ENTIRE HILL OF GRASS ABOUT 40 FEET TOP TO BOTTOM AND ABOUT 60 FEET LEFT TO RIGHT, THIS IS MY FIRST TIME EVER PLANTING PAKASANDRA'S AND IM NOT SURE HOW TO GO ABOUT THIS, SUCH AS HOW FAR APART TO PLANT EM AND WHETHER OR NOT I SHOULD KILL THE GRASS FIRST OR JUST PLANT EM IN THE GRASS.
ANY PROFESSIONAL HELP WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.

...JIM:dizzy:

ipm
02-07-2003, 08:58 PM
Pachysandra /space 12-15" apart. Foliage groundcover for shade, common name -Japanese Spurge.

You will need about 2,400 plants at 12" spacing. I would purchase flats. 18 to a flat= 133 flats.

You might want to back fill plants with a compost.

kill the grass 1st.

1MajorTom
02-07-2003, 08:58 PM
First question:
What type of sunlight does this hillside receive?
Pachysandra thrive best in deep shade. Used for a ground cover in shady areas such as under trees where it is hard to grow grass.
Pachysandra will not do well in full sun.
They grow slowly, thru a network of underground runners.
Once established, pachysandra makes a thick dense bed.

Newly planted pachysandra should be planted in mulch. (not a heavy mulch.)

mdb landscaping
02-07-2003, 09:16 PM
jodis right. make sure there is a little amount of sunlight hitting the pacysandra, because otherwise it will eventually die.

baddboygeorge
02-08-2003, 12:16 AM
i plant mine at 6 inches apart , it gives it a full effect asap an looks good . when i plant ground cover i use a cordless drill an a bulb auger an it goes super quick . if you have grass kill out first !!

devildog
02-08-2003, 04:55 AM
Have you decided which variety to use? Claytonia for example, (virginica) is a very early beautiful little plant. But, although its flowers are lovely, however they are very small. On the other hand, Claytonia siberica has thicker, more deeply veined foliage and it flowers for months.
Procumbens, commonly referred to as Allegheny spurge. In virtually every respect, it is superior to its more frequently used Asian cousin, terminalis is a very aggressive and stoloniferous. This can be helpful if you want to fill in a very large area super fast. The American variety, P. procumbens, is a clump forming groundcover that fills in an area a little more slowly, but much more elegant.
Procumbens is hardy in most areas of the U.S., probably into zone 4, in colder areas it is a herbaceous perennial. In the early spring, when the ground is bare, procumbens puts forth spikes of pink and white fragrant flowers that last two weeks. Soon after the dark green leaves begin show. In deep shade, the foliage remains a dark, luxurious green all summer. The more sun that the plants get, the lighter their leaves are. They will be healthy and productive but the leaves are paler in color, some with an almost chloritic appearance. This is a dappled-to-deep shade plant!
Are there erosion issues with this hill once you kill of the grass? Is it irrigated? As far as quantity needed, will depend on whether you use liners, 4" or 1's, and of course the "budget".
with regards... devildog

JimB
02-08-2003, 04:31 PM
THE PROBLEM WITH THIS HILL IS THAT IT IS LIKE A SKI SLOPE IT'S SO STEEP, SO MOWING IT EVEN WITH A WALK BEHIND SCAG IS A NIGHTMARE. THE OWNER TOLD ME THAT HE AGREE'S THAT THE HILL SHOULD NOT BE GRASS BECAUSE OF THAT AND HE WANTS ME TO GET RID OF THE GRASS AND JUST PLANT ANYTHING THAT LOOKS DECENT, HE JUST DOESN'T WANT WEEDS THERE BUT ANYTHING ELSE WOULD BE FINE, PLEASE, SOMEBODY HELP ME WITH THIS PROBLEM HILL ONCE AND FOR ALL.
ONE MORE THING, THE HILL GETS LOTS OF SUNSHINE AND A MODERATE AMOUNT OF WATER RUN DOWN.


...JIM:dizzy: :dizzy:

devildog
02-08-2003, 04:50 PM
Is this hill irrigated?

Lets think outside the box... does it have to be planted.... can it be terraced or landscaped in some other fashion?

Why just ground-cover? Is there a reason for "all groundcover"

Can you get a Designer or LA in your region to assist with this 1000 square foot "ski slope"?

Can you drop all the "caps" on your posts, please.

with regards... devildog

baddboygeorge
02-08-2003, 06:29 PM
i have had problems like this before with steep slopes an sometimes there wasnt enough room for terraces so what i did is covered the entire hill with netting that you use for grass on hills an plant the pacs in the net where the net will hold the root system in an then i mulched over the net .that was like two years ago now its completely covered in pacs an looks good an solved alot of problems with that area. i also fertilize them with triple 10 every few months an they thrive from the fertilizer . any more questions feel free!!

dan deutekom
02-08-2003, 07:38 PM
Other options might be cotoneaster, vinca or perhaps ornamental grasses

Lanelle
02-08-2003, 09:15 PM
I agree that a geo-jute netting will help hold the hill while the planting becomes established.

JimB
02-10-2003, 09:29 PM
:waving: Ok, sorry about the caps devildog, as for the rest of your advice, im not really sure what your talking about.
This whole project sounds like a nightmare I can avoid by subing this out to another guy, I dont have time for all this stuff.
I thought that this would be a somewhat easy project but it's getting worse every time i think about it.



thanx again everyone ...Jim

KCLandscape
02-15-2003, 08:48 PM
If you dont do landscaping on a regular basis, forget it. However, although we do a fair amount of maint, we have 2 steep slopes that the client is trying to improve. that kind of job is a virtual gold mine if you approch it right

Turfdude
02-15-2003, 09:20 PM
To figure your spacing, just layout a grid on graph paper. I too suggest 6" spacing. We get flats of pachysandra for $13.00 for 100 plants/flat. If you're doing 6" O.C. spacing, you need 4 plants/sq ft, then figure in plants for your end row & end column. ( of course, if you have 2400 sq ft & keep your plants in 6" from all sides, you'll need 96 flats.
You should get the ground prepped first, spread 15 yds of mulch (27 cu ft/yd*6 = 162 sq ft/yd at 2" depth - 2400/162=14.81) to the 2" depth, then have one guy poke holes in mulch & soil w/ minipick, or small drill w/ auger and have 2nd guy put in plants. This job will probably take 2 guys 1.5 days. It is monotonous work. We did a job 1/3 this size and as much as I enjoy landscaping & the final look of the project, I was bored outta my gourd!

Good luck
Bob

Sorry, just read lots of sun - go w/ ivy instead - cost is slightly higher, but it thrives in sun. Vinca is another good one, but very cost prohibitive here.