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o-so-n-so
02-26-2003, 11:26 PM
I was told today that you couldn't switch from the two fuels. You could use one or the other but if you switch it will cause the O rings in the pump to swell and damage the pump.
This person also said the he got better performance from "on road" fuel.
Is this true????????

hollywood
02-27-2003, 09:28 AM
to my knowledge, the only difference between on-road and off-road fuel is a dye. on-road fuel also costs more per gallon in my area. as for switching fuels, in my state it is illegal to use off-road fuel in a vehicle designated for highway use. if caught using off-road fuel, the fine is expensive.

a mechanic friend of mine told me that in older diesel engines using off-road fuel when on-road fuel should have been used could result in premature failure of the fuel pump. it had something to do with sulfur content in the fuel and its effect on lubrication in the pump itself. apparently the pumps burn up faster.

alot of farms in my area use one type of fuel for everthing diesel that they own. the savings per gallon in using off-road fuel are significant enough that it is is worth it to the owners to replace fuel system components on trucks used on the highway.

greenngrow
02-27-2003, 09:58 AM
Just don't get caught with the off road fuel in your on road truck $$$$$ fees.

Yes the farm fuel is higher in sulfur and it has a dye so it can be detected.

I use the on ON road fuel in all my diesel's including my tractor.

kayssupply
02-27-2003, 04:23 PM
I have been told by more than one of the areas better diesel mechanics to put a quart of transmission fluid to 10gal. of on road fuel. It is supposed to replace the lube qualitys of the off road. This applies to the older diesels with straight mechanical injection.

o-so-n-so
02-27-2003, 05:46 PM
The reason for this question is that I have a diesel powered stump grinder ( 1997 year model) that had only run "on road" fuel until about a month ago. The only reason I changed to " off road" fuel is because it's cheaper. I also bought a new tractor this week and thought I would run " off road" fuel in it as well. Is this legal? I don't own any other diesel powered equipment. My only tow unit is gasoline power. Should I go back to "on road" fuel for any reason?

DaddyRabbit
02-28-2003, 09:09 AM
OK, here's the down low on on an off road diesel fuel. The only difference is the added dye. The cetane rating is the same as well as the sulfer content. It wouldn't be very advantageous on an oil companies part to go to the added expense of another refinery for merely another type of diesel. There are some diesels however w/higher cetane ratings than others. The only reason for the dye is taxation plain an simple. I run off road in everything I have. I figure the washington bureaucrat's are fat enough on capitol hill w/out my money.

dougaustreim
02-28-2003, 01:27 PM
Yes, the dye is the only difference. Federal law, however, do not put the dyed diesel in a licencsed highway vehicle. We have to report every three months to the state any dyed diesel fuel that we use on road and pay the tax. This includes any work on highway contruction like road side seeding etc.

Suggest using soy or bio diesel in older equipment. The small percentage of soy oil in the mix adds significant lubrication and is especially useful in older engines. We have an 82 IH with 9 liter engine. When I use soy diesel, I get several mpg better fuel consumption, and the truck moves faster and snappier.

Doug
Austreim Landscaping

o-so-n-so
02-28-2003, 07:25 PM
Thanks for the info....In that case I will keep using "off road" fuel.

NYRookie
03-22-2003, 06:42 PM
I run on-road fuel in my tractor only. I keep all my receipts, which I'm sure everyone does. The extra tax that I pay on the fuel now is taken off as a credit when I file my taxes at the end of the year. I even purchased a seperate fuel tank to put off-road in until my accountant told me it wasn't worth it. My buddy bought it off me when his furnace tank got a hole.

CIBOLOCREEK@YAHOO.COM
11-11-2005, 06:48 AM
what is another name for off road diesel
thanks
larry arredondo

CIBOLOCREEK@YAHOO.COM
11-11-2005, 06:54 AM
OK, here's the down low on on an off road diesel fuel. The only difference is the added dye. The cetane rating is the same as well as the sulfer content. It wouldn't be very advantageous on an oil companies part to go to the added expense of another refinery for merely another type of diesel. There are some diesels however w/higher cetane ratings than others. The only reason for the dye is taxation plain an simple. I run off road in everything I have. I figure the washington bureaucrat's are fat enough on capitol hill w/out my money.


DADDY RABBIT
WHAT IS ANOTHER NAME FOR OFF ROAD DIESEL

THANK-YOU,
LARRY ARREDONDO

C&KLawnCare
11-11-2005, 07:39 AM
what is another name for off road diesel
thanks


Same as the nicnames for onroad diesel, Fuel oil, Diesel, Heating oil, #2 diesel, Ect ect,

Years ago all the diesel fuel was the same , highsulpher fuel and it was the same color they had no idea back then if it had taxes paid on it or not , So here comes some wacko . and his tree huggers in hand spouting out lets get the sulpher out of diesel fuel. .

Well They did and started sticking red dye in the high sulpher diesel , The argument about it is all the same just the dye is the only diffrence is pure bullcrap , Many many places the off road diesel is the same stuff that it all was before we ever heard of Low sulpher and Offroad .

Switching between the two is another bunch of hogwash The fuel syestems of todays diesel's are built to withstand both , The Older diesels that had the seal problems was because the method used to removed the sulpher also took along the lubricity of the diesel fuel ,

Our equipment has seen both ran thru for years and not one problem. though i swear to me with out a dyno to test em they ran better on the Off road High sulpher diesel .

They are not worried about sulpher in the diesel it was all a bunch iof crap to start the red dye stuff , But yet guess who runs the most off road diesel thats high sulpher up and down the highways daily .

Good ole Uncle sam thats who .

Guthrie&Co
11-14-2005, 03:25 AM
a mechanic friend of mine told me that in older diesel engines using off-road fuel when on-road fuel should have been used could result in premature failure of the fuel pump. it had something to do with sulfur content in the fuel and its effect on lubrication in the pump itself. apparently the pumps burn up faster.

.
well your buddy is a pud f uck, sullfur is what lubricates the pump and keeps it from burning up.

northeastpropertymgmt
11-14-2005, 01:48 PM
so wich is better to run. if it dident mader what was for the highway and not. what is better for the engine, more power, longer life.

Guthrie&Co
11-15-2005, 12:46 PM
they are both the same fuel. the only diffrence is the dye.

C&KLawnCare
11-17-2005, 10:24 AM
well your buddy is a pud f uck, sullfur is what lubricates the pump and keeps it from burning up

And your a bigger pud f uck because you dont even know what your talking about , Sulpher did / does not lubricate a injector pump , You ever seen dry sulpher ????????? Didint think so





they are both the same fuel. the only diffrence is the dye

That is 100,000 Percent bullshit , They are not the same friggen fuel at all . maybe out of 50 states maybe 2-3 have low sulpher as off road but the rest dont , How about educating your self some scaby before you go popping off .

C&KLawnCare
11-17-2005, 10:41 AM
call these fellers up and tell em their wrong , that its all the same all but the dye and watch em laugh ya off the phone

Looper delivers kerosene, high sulphur diesel for off-road equipment, low sulphur diesel for on-road vehicular use and gasoline. We're courteous and quick!
Contact us now!

Looper Oil Company, Inc.
7117 Mt. Holly-Huntersville Rd
Charlotte, NC 28216

I dont know who it was that ever started the line of crap world wide that the off road and on road diesel is the same all but the dye , But its a damned lie

Grass Man
11-17-2005, 12:20 PM
.... So noted, thanks :).

hollywood
11-18-2005, 06:19 AM
Well put C&K. There is alot of misinformation floating around.....

UNISCAPER
12-02-2005, 09:09 PM
Ever add some dye neutralizer to turn the color of the fuel back to original? Works slick as snot. I'm not running off road fuel on road, but i watched a guy dump the stuff in a white plastic tank and litterally turn it into on road tint.

Dirty Water
12-03-2005, 12:42 PM
Wa is required to sell low sulfur diesal at all pumps now, even at the offroad ones.

DKinWA
12-03-2005, 07:34 PM
Jon, is this new legislation for washington state?, because I've not heard this before. It just so happens my Pettit bill came today and there's lines for both high sulfur off road and low sulfur road diesel. Even the CFN (Pettit is part of CFN) off road pumps I use still say "high sulfur".

Dirty Water
12-03-2005, 07:40 PM
Jon, is this new legislation for washington state?, because I've not heard this before. It just so happens my Pettit bill came today and there's lines for both high sulfur off road and low sulfur road diesel. Even the CFN (Pettit is part of CFN) off road pumps I use still say "high sulfur".

Perhaps I'm wrong, I just know that the one station I can get pink at here says "low sulfur offroad" on the pump.

anteater6788
12-07-2005, 07:05 PM
I think that the next set of EPA regulations for '06 or '07 will require the off road diesel to be low sulfur diesel as well. I wouldn't worry about either hurting the engine components, alot of the diesel engines out there are used in both on road and off road applications with the main difference being the difference to meet the difference in EPA regulations.

UNISCAPER
12-07-2005, 07:30 PM
Mack will be producing a 16 liter, 700 HP engine developing 1600 ft lbs of torque at 1900 RPM for 2007. It uses a Maxidyne variable pitch turbo that is calibrated to the amount of weight the truck will pull under various conditions.

They completely redesigned the engine to accept sulfurless fuels without eating the injection pump and valves prematurely.
We have a dilema upon us with the extraction of sulfer from fuels. The process is similar to the way that coffee is freeze-dryed. The result, is tiny microscopic particles left behind that wear injection pumps and valves faster in engines that were designed with the intent that sulfer would be used as a lubricant. A band-aid fix is to run a good fuel conditioner or a similar additive. What the liberoids in the EPA failed to do once again was add some very important criteria when they pulled their numbers on particulants from diesel exhaust. They tested brand new engines on dynos in laboratory conditions. what they forgot is that by running the engines with the new fuels, they will wear out fster than with sulfer. When you test the same diesel after 300,000miles running sulferless fuels, the additional wear and looser tolerances produced more garbage than the engine running sulfer fuel with the same milage. Now, in reality, you got an independant trucker eeecking out his living with a rig. If his truck is still running well, do you think for a minute, he will down it to exchange a $3,000.00 injector pump? Nope. he is going to keep running it until it shows loss of power. So, once again, our government hard at work to screw up what worked very well.

lb59
12-29-2005, 10:43 AM
I was told today that you couldn't switch from the two fuels. You could use one or the other but if you switch it will cause the O rings in the pump to swell and damage the pump.
This person also said the he got better performance from "on road" fuel.
Is this true????????

How can switching between paying and not paying tax on it cause a problem?

lb59
12-29-2005, 10:48 AM
Just don't get caught with the off road fuel in your on road truck $$$$$ fees.

Yes the farm fuel is higher in sulfur and it has a dye so it can be detected.

I use the on ON road fuel in all my diesel's including my tractor.

There is no sulfur in the red dye.

lb59
12-29-2005, 10:57 AM
[QUOTE=o-so-n-so]1*I also bought a new tractor this week and thought I would run off road fuel in it as well. Is this legal?
2* Should I go back to "on road" fuel for any reason?QUOTE]

*****************************************************
1*It certainly is. The rip off that irks me is that all the gas stations charge me tax for off road use.
2*Only if you like paying for something you're not getting.

lb59
12-29-2005, 11:20 AM
OK, here's the down low on on an off road diesel fuel. The only difference is the added dye. The cetane rating is the same as well as the sulfer content.
1*The only reason for the dye is taxation plain an simple. .
1*What it boils down to is there is only one fuel with 2 prices on it.

lb59
12-29-2005, 11:24 AM
what is another name for off road diesel
thanks
larry arredondo
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Non taxable

lb59
12-29-2005, 11:50 AM
so wich is better to run. if it dident mader what was for the highway and not. what is better for the engine, more power, longer life.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Let's put it this way: You buy a car and pay tax or you buy a car and don't pay tax .
Which car is the best car?

C&KLawnCare
12-29-2005, 06:21 PM
1*What it boils down to is there is only one fuel with 2 prices on it.


I dont know who it was that ever started the line of crap world wide that the off road and on road diesel is the same all but the dye , But its a damned lie

For the last time OFF ROAD DIESEL AND ON ROAD ARE NOT THE SAME DAMN FUEL < CHRIST A KID WITH A STOPED UP NOSE COULD TELL YA WHAT FUEL WAS OFF ROAD BY THE SMELL

Guthrie&Co
12-30-2005, 08:45 PM
And your a bigger pud f uck because you dont even know what your talking about , Sulpher did / does not lubricate a injector pump , You ever seen dry sulpher ????????? Didint think so







That is 100,000 Percent bullshit , They are not the same friggen fuel at all . maybe out of 50 states maybe 2-3 have low sulpher as off road but the rest dont , How about educating your self some scaby before you go popping off .
then tell us asshat, what is the difrence then. show us how little you really do know. and i dont want some buddy of mine told me this line of bullshit story either. so far you have given no proof of your false statments. pack it up your ass and f uck yourself

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 10:23 PM
then tell us asshat, what is the difrence then. show us how little you really do know. and i dont want some buddy of mine told me this line of bullshit story either. so far you have given no proof of your false statments. pack it up your ass and f uck yourself


Oh Listen to this **** will ya Mr Know it all trying to tell a Diesel mechanic he dont know what he is talking about .

Listen dickhead SULPHER DID NOT EVER LUBE INJECTOR PUMPS OR INJECTORS, The reason low sulpher fuel started causing problems was the way they removed the sulpher from the diesel it also took the lubricating quality of the diesel fuel with it .

Hell theirs all kinds of proof on the internet, Diesel shops , Fuel bullitens if you want proof all ya have to do is look ass hole

{what is the difrence then} I would expect that from a 23 year old . The diffrence is nit wit , Off road is HIGH SULPHER DIESEL FUEL LIKE IT WAS FOR YEARS AND YEARS B4 THEY STATED THE LOW SULPHER STUFF AND DUMPING RED DYE TO OFF ROAD. On road is low sulpher diesel , Thats the damn diffreence ya idiot ,


{and i dont want some buddy of mine told me this line of bullshit story either. so far you have given no proof of your false statments. pack it up your ass and f uck yourself}

Oh but it was ok for you to say Oh a buddy of mine that dont know his ass from a hole in the ground told you something and u get on here like its written in gold , Next time u tell me to go F Uck my self you better hope to hell your not 50 ft away our your little ass will be counting teeth , you understand that PUNK

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 10:46 PM
What is the difference between diesel fuel and gasoline?

Diesel fuel differs from gasoline in several ways. Diesel fuel is heavier and "oilier" than gasoline. It evaporates much more slowly because it is composed of larger hydrocarbon molecules, which have higher boiling points, typically 150 °C to 370 °C.

How is diesel fuel classified?

Diesel fuel is usually classified as:

Seasonal diesel fuel: Type B or Number 2 – the most commonly used diesel fuel.
Light diesel fuels: Type A or Number 1, for special applications.
Recently, diesel fuel has also been classified by sulphur content: low sulphur and regular sulphur diesel.

What is low sulphur diesel fuel?

Low sulphur diesel fuel (LSD) is fuel that contains less than 500 parts per million
(0.05 wt per cent) sulphur. It is usually used for on-road applications. Since Jan. 1, 1998, all on-road diesel fuel in Canada must be LSD.

What is regular sulphur diesel fuel?

Regular sulphur diesel fuel (RSD) is fuel that contains less than 5,000 parts per million (0.5 wt per cent) sulphur. It is usually used in off-road applications such as farming, forestry and marine.

How can I tell if diesel fuel is low sulphur or regular sulphur?

All on-highway diesel fuel sold in Canada is low sulphur. Since dyed or marked off-road diesel fuel may be regular sulphur or low sulphur, ask your local supplier about the sulphur content of its off-road diesel fuel. In Western Canada, all Petro-Canada diesel fuels sold for off-road use are normally low sulphur.

Does low sulphur diesel fuel have adequate lubricity like regular sulphur diesel fuel?

Yes! All Petro-Canada diesel fuels have satisfactory lubricity as required by the National Standard of Canada for Automotive Low Sulphur Diesel Fuel.

Does Petro-Canada diesel fuel contain a lubricity additive?

All Petro-Canada diesel fuels have suitable lubricity to protect current fuel systems (pumps and injectors). Most of Petro-Canada's diesel fuels have good natural lubricity (even "low sulphur" diesel fuels), especially during the spring, summer and early fall.

Lighter, low cloud point, winter diesel fuels contain a lubricity additive in keeping with the requirements of the National Standard of Canada for Automotive Low Sulphur Diesel Fuel. Petro-Canada recommends that customers avoid routinely adding additional lubricity additive to fuels as high dose rates of some lubricity additives have been found to cause problems such as sticking of plungers, metering valves or fuel injector racks.

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 10:57 PM
What is Low Sulphur Diesel?

Low Sulphur Diesel is Automotive Diesel Fuel with a sulphur content restricted to 500ppm maximum (or 0.05% by mass). It is produced in Western Australia at BP’s Kwinana Refinery, and Queensland at BP's Bulwer Island Refinery.

What are the benefits of Low Sulphur Diesel?

Environmental and health benefits are

reduced exhaust particulate emissions


reduced odours


reduced sulphur dioxide emissions and


improved local air quality.
Performance benefits are

decreased corrosion in pistons and/or cylinder liner wear


reduced maintenance costs


potentially extended lubricant life and increased oil drain interval as well as


improved long-term storage life of diesel fuel.

Why is sulphur being removed from diesel?

Diesel engines are very efficient with low levels of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. The main concern with diesel engine emissions has always been smoke because it is clearly visible, particularly at high engine loads. In the past this smoke was considered to be undesirable because of aesthetics and odour, but now there is growing concern about the health effects of this particulate matter when it is breathed into the lungs. Reducing the sulphur content of diesel fuel reduces the smoke levels.


Where is Low Sulphur Diesel available?

From 1, Jaunary 2003, Low Sulphur Diesel will be the only form of Automotive Diesel Fuel available from all BP service stations throughout Australia. It is also available in Northern NSW.

What’s next?

BP's cleaner fuels journey saw the introduction in 2001 of Ultra Low Sulphur Diesel. As an even cleaner diesel fuel with a sulphur content restricted to 50ppm maximum, ULSD has 10 times less sulphur than Australian standards and will further assist Australia keep pace with the tighter regulatory environments of the US and Europe.




Concentration of Sulphur in Off-road Diesel Fuel:
The concentration of sulphur in off-road diesel fuel is unregulated in Canada and averages
approximately 3,000 parts per million (ppm) in Ontario (2002 data). This is much higher than
what is found in Canadian gasoline and on-road diesel fuel. By federal regulation, gasoline will
be limited to 30 ppm sulphur by January 2005, and on-road diesel fuel to 15 ppm by mid-2006.
Sulphur concentration in off-road diesel fuel is also currently unregulated in the USA. In May,
2003, the US EPA released a proposed rule that would regulate the level of sulphur in off-road
diesel fuel to a maximum of 15 ppm. As an interim measure, the proposal would require refiners
to produce off-road, locomotive and marine diesel fuel with a maximum sulphur concentration of
500 ppm by June 1, 2007. By June 1, 2010, the limit on sulphur in fuel used for off-road
applications (excluding locomotive and marine applications) would be 15 ppm. The US EPA is
considering including locomotive and marine diesel fuel in the 15 ppm cap by 2010.
As part of its proposed rule, the US EPA is also proposing new off-road diesel engine emission
standards, and meeting these standards will require vehicles to employ highly efficient aftertreatment
systems. Ultra-low sulphur diesel fuel is required by 2010 to allow the after-treatment
devices installed in 2011 model year off-road diesel engines to operate properly.
In August 2003, the federal government released a discussion paper on designing a Canadian
regulation to align allowable sulphur levels in off-road diesel fuel with those of the proposed US
rule. The discussion paper proposed limiting sulphur levels in off-road diesel fuel to 15 ppm,
with an interim limit of 500 ppm, by the same dates as in the US proposal. However, within this
framework, the Canadian government is considering simpler rules, with fewer exceptions to the
sulphur limits and fewer administrative requirements than the American proposal. This proposal
is consistent with Environment Canada’s “Federal Agenda on Cleaner Vehicles, Engines and
Fuels”, released in 2001, which outlined the government’s plan to reduce pollution from
vehicles, engines and fuels.
It should be noted that in California, sulphur limits for off-road diesel fuel will be lowered to 15
ppm earlier than in the rest of the United States. In California, limits on sulphur in fuels apply to
both on-road and off-road fuels, and in that state off-road diesel fuel is already limited to 500
ppm sulphur. In California, it is proposed that the maximum allowable level of sulphur in all onroad
and off-road diesel fuel sold, will be reduced from 500 ppm to 15 ppm, starting June 1,
2006. The proposed regulation has been approved, and it is anticipated that it will be finalized
by the California Air Resources Board executive officer in the near future.
It is recommended that the federal Minister of Environment be requested to limit the
concentration of sulphur in off-road diesel fuel to 15 parts per million by 2010, as is proposed in
the United States, as this change would substantially reduce sulphur-related emissions from the
off-road sector. It is recommended that the 15 ppm limit be applied to diesel fuel used in
locomotive and marine applications as well.

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 11:14 PM
Off-road diesel fuel – refers to diesel fuel that is used for off-road purposes (i.e., mining, farming, marine, etc.). Off-road diesel fuel is frequently dyed red or "marked" to show that it is exempt from provincial road taxes. fuel that contains less than 5,000 parts per million (0.5 wt per cent) sulphur, may not be used on-road, and is usually used in off-road applications such as farming, forestry and marine.

Low sulphur diesel fuel – fuel that contains less than 500 parts per million (0.05 wt per cent) sulphur, required for on-road applications, and may be used off-road.


NOw Scaby ya want to run that trap some more and show people how much more ignoarnt you are or are we done here,

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 11:28 PM
Ill apologize for my tone . But ill be damned if i get cussed at like i did by a snot nosed 23 yr old that needs a big lesson in manners

Guthrie&Co
12-30-2005, 11:36 PM
Ill apologize for my tone . But ill be damned if i get cussed at like i did by a snot nosed 23 yr old that needs a big lesson in manners
YOu started dealing it out so i dealt it back to you . seems like your internet ego cant handle it. anymore of harassment or threats in the pm's you send me will be delt with promptly.

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 11:42 PM
Oh really jesus christ your such a Jerkoff and a damned crybaby

Grass Man
12-30-2005, 11:44 PM
.... Thanks C&K for the definitive discussion. That kind of brings me up-to-date :waving:.

Off-road diesel fuel – refers to diesel fuel that is used for off-road purposes (i.e., mining, farming, marine, etc.). Off-road diesel fuel is frequently dyed red or "marked" to show that it is exempt from provincial road taxes. fuel that contains less than 5,000 parts per million (0.5 wt per cent) sulphur, may not be used on-road, and is usually used in off-road applications such as farming, forestry and marine.

Low sulphur diesel fuel – fuel that contains less than 500 parts per million (0.05 wt per cent) sulphur, required for on-road applications, and may be used off-road.

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 11:45 PM
Oh really jesus christ your such a Jerkoff and a damned crybaby


ROFLMAO Here is my PM back from Babyscapesthis is your warning. i dont put up with harassment from you or anyone else. Espicially from anyone like you. if you think you can handle 6'4'' and 280lbs bring it. if your behavior continues in this manner you will be delt with in the correct way.


Yoiu just bring your damn 6ft4 280 Lb ass up this way and watch how fast 6ft 139 Lbs knocks your ass in the dirt pal

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 11:48 PM
Your welcome Grass Man Sorry ya had to weed thru the imature crybabies that this site gets , But now people can understand the difrences in the fuels

BTW Scaby the only one doing any harassing is you harassing me , i just told you in my pm ya didnt know ur ass from a hole in the ground your the ones thats harassing so stick it punk

Guthrie&Co
12-30-2005, 11:53 PM
Your 34 years old and you act like this? man seriously, get a life. typical from a inbreed from west by god virginia. get real. i am not going to lower myself to your immature level. have a nice day

Guthrie&Co
12-30-2005, 11:56 PM
.... Thanks C&K for the definitive discussion. That kind of brings me up-to-date :waving:.
nice google by the way. i assume you forgot to mention the part where it read that sulphur was part of the lubrication in the fuel. but....as you stated earlier it wasnt...so which is it?

C&KLawnCare
12-30-2005, 11:58 PM
nice google by the way. i assume you forgot to mention the part where it read that sulphur was part of the lubrication in the fuel. but....as you stated earlier it wasnt...so which is it?

Scaby if you had 1/2 a fricken brain cell you would know SULPHER wont lubricate a dang Injector pump . BTW I didnt use google dumbass

Guthrie&Co
12-31-2005, 12:01 AM
The process of producing the lower sulfur content raises the Cetane rating of the fuel, but lowers the fuel lubricity. The seal shrink&swell characteristic of low sulfur fuel is different than the high sulfur stuff. Some engines need the higher Cetane of low sulfur fuel. The off road high sulfur fuel I buy for my tractors has a Cetane rating of 40, while the low sulfur highway fuel has a rating of 45. copy and paste from the site.
http://dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/FAQ/diesel_fuel.htm#onoff_fuel
here is the link read the rest

C&KLawnCare
12-31-2005, 12:27 AM
The process of producing the lower sulfur content raises the Cetane rating of the fuel, but lowers the fuel lubricity. The seal shrink&swell characteristic of low sulfur fuel is different than the high sulfur stuff. Some engines need the higher Cetane of low sulfur fuel. The off road high sulfur fuel I buy for my tractors has a Cetane rating of 40, while the low sulfur highway fuel has a rating of 45. copy and paste from the site.


You idiot you dont even understand what you read. That does not in no way no how state that the sulpher is a Lubricant , Jesus christ did you even make it past 5th grade in school? Have you ever looked at a chunk of coal and see the red/yellow/white streaks of sulpher in the stuff , Have you ever seen sulpher in a dry form christ that stuff would be like pouring sand in the diesel fuel and saying it was a lubricant , And you have balls to call me a inbreed and stupid West Virginian , Well least i have forgotten more crap about engines than you ever knew ******* .



In meetings with Patrick Swan, a well-known failure analysis expert in our road transport industry, I discovered my own diesel ignorance. It was time to straighten the record. When fuel is such a vital component of profit or loss, trucking people must have a better 'handle' on diesel fuel terminology and the way we use this information. In this feature, we will discuss issues such as:

What is a cetane number and why is this number an important reference point?
Is sulphur only a negative factor? Does sulphur in diesel have any benefit?
How can one detect that diesel is premixed with illuminating paraffin?
How does SA diesel fuel match international standards?
How can truckers ensure the quality of diesel which is delivered and stored?
To kick off, let's look at the basic requirements for a diesel fuel. They are, that it:



Cetane Number
The cetane number of a fuel indicates how readily it is able to self ignite in the engine. As a measure of diesel fuel's ignition quality, it represents the time delay between injection and ignition. A number around 100 has a negligible time delay while 0 is excessively long. After injection begins, atomised fuel particles must be given time to evaporate and mix with the compressed air in the combustion chamber, eventually forming a flammable mixture of fuel vapour and air. Injection continues after ignition has occurred. The combustion chamber then contains swirling pockets of burning fuel together with other pockets of evaporating raw fuel.

Because combustion is inefficient during the flame propagation period, the ignition delay period which causes it should be as short as possible. This can be affected by aspects of engine design but the nature of the fuel is the most important factor in reducing ignition delay.

Local temperatures and air-fuel ratios vary greatly. Too high a cetane number means fuel will ignite too close to the injector, forming a fuel rich zone around the injector, while the remainder of the combustion chamber has a weak air-fuel ratio. Incomplete combustion and soot particle formations occur in fuel rich zones resulting in black smoke.

For typical on and off highway engines, a cetane number of 45-50 is considered ideal. Note that SABS 342 has a minimum cetane number of 45 compared to the USA 2D standard of 40. Actual SA cetane numbers are around 48 while in the USA, the average for 2D grade is 45.

Higher cetane numbers may be required for future high speed engines but this will depend on combustion chamber design and particularly, air swirl within the chamber. Under cold start conditions, higher cetane number fuels ignite more readily and at start up have lesser white smoke. According to failure analysis consultant Patrick Swan: "Balancing emissions between start up and a hot engine is a major priority for modern engine designers. A cetane number greater than 40 is considered adequate for modern diesel engines."

To the driver, the most noticeable effect of low cetane fuels is the familiar diesel knock (increased noise). Starting may also be difficult, especially at low temperatures. Other effects include rougher running and increased exhaust emissions. When using fuels with higher cetane numbers, the engine starts more easily with a shorter warm up period and a better fuel consumption is achieved. There is less white smoke (caused by unburned fuel). However if the cetane number is too high, the engine is more likely to produce black smoke. This is because the short ignition delay means that some raw fuel is sprayed into an established flame, producing soot.

C&KLawnCare
12-31-2005, 12:41 AM
Does low sulfur diesel fuel have enough lubricity?

Yes. Even though the process used to lower the sulfur in diesel can also remove some of the components that give the fuel its lubricity, reputable refiners monitor this property and use an additive, as needed, to raise the lubricity to an acceptable level.


14. Will low sulfur diesel cause fuel system leaks?

The introduction of low sulfur diesel for on-road use in the U.S. was accompanied by problems such as fuel system leaks. These problems appear to be linked to the change in the aromatics content of the fuel and the age of the seal material.

Diesel fuel systems contain "O-rings" and other parts using elastomers that swell slightly when they come in contact with diesel fuel and absorb aromatic compounds from the fuel. Exposure to fuel with lower aromatics content will result in some of the absorbed aromatics being leached out causing the elastomer to shrink.

If the elastomer is still pliable this shrinkage will not cause a leak. However, if age or service at higher-than-normal temperature has caused the elastomer to loose its elasticity, a leak could occur. Engine owners should be aware that elastomeric parts have finite lives and should be replaced as necessary.

By itself, low sulfur or low aromatics diesel fuel does not cause fuel system leaks. They are caused by the combination of a change from higher to lower aromatics fuel and aged O-rings and elastomeric parts that have lost their elasticity.

True Cut Lawn Maintenance
12-31-2005, 12:36 PM
Why dont you two get off your damn power trips and act like civalized people and quit talking about how one can kick that others ass

GROW UP

Guthrie&Co
12-31-2005, 12:48 PM
Hey i am all for it but he wants a pisssing contest about how he is the ultimate fighter. frankly i could careless what that inbreed has to say or how he 'thinks' he is the baddest half breed in west virginia.

lawnmaniac883
12-31-2005, 02:41 PM
Wow, did this thread go to sh!t or what? Had some really good reading till two people began to disagree on something as ******ed as diesel lubrication? There was a thread on the TDR about how bosch tested low sulphur diesel in their injection pumps and concluded that it did have less lubrication for their CP3 injection pump than regular #2. Why? I dont know and am not going to take a guess, but somehow reduced sulphur does make an impact on diesel fuel. Simple as that, stop b!tchin at each other.

UNISCAPER
12-31-2005, 02:59 PM
We use KY jelly in the exhaust pipes of all our no sulfer vehicles. It's kind of messy, and it lubricates and reduces friction the truck can enter into marathon status without the risk of burns from friction!

Grass Man
12-31-2005, 03:18 PM
.... Oh my, I never thought diesel fuel was so importain :rolleyes:.



We use KY jelly in the exhaust pipes of all our no sulfer vehicles. It's kind of messy, and it lubricates and reduces friction the truck can enter into marathon status without the risk of burns from friction!

C&KLawnCare
01-01-2006, 09:52 AM
Hey i am all for it but he wants a pisssing contest about how he is the ultimate fighter. frankly i could careless what that inbreed has to say or how he 'thinks' he is the baddest half breed in west virginia.



Re: Hey dickhead

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Your telling me to grow up? you need to take a look at yourself first. You must have the little dick syndrome. seems like your bullshit mouth makes up for what you lack elsewhere. go **** your mother or your father. which ever you please. dont forget about the goats either

Quote:
Originally Posted by C&KLawnCare your the muther___ that has mental issuse u stupid inbred bastard . Id love to see you talk this crap in front of me because your stupid brainless ass would stand up about 5 seconds till i pounded your ass into the ground grow up ya stupid cocksucker just grow the **** up


they have medication and hospitials for your mental issues. cb radio hahaha inbreed hahaha squeel like a pig. you have all of your teeth?


Yea he is all for it this is the crap from my pm box and more he goes the more pissed i get, Someone in NC knock the **** out of this 23 year old thats been in buisness 9 years ROFLMAO,

Talking about parents scaby is a good damn way to get knocked on your fat ass pal

True Cut Lawn Maintenance
01-01-2006, 03:18 PM
Quit the damn pissing contest and grow the hell up and quit making this site look like crap with your baby arguments, if you want to b*tch at each other exchange e-mail addresses.

South Florida Lawns
01-01-2006, 04:13 PM
Now can you tell me the difference between Kerosene and Diesel?

I wanna hear it from C&k and CrabbyScapes in the same format and mood as the following posts.

UNISCAPER
01-01-2006, 04:41 PM
I knew Cara Seen, she was a hottie....

lawnmaniac883
01-01-2006, 06:17 PM
I knew Cara Seen, she was a hottie....


Lol, that straight outta the redneck dictionary on Blue Collar TV?

UNISCAPER
01-01-2006, 06:37 PM
Nope. Straight out of my soon to be published book called "Billisms" A word reference of day to day things that really make a whole lot more sense being called something else!

C&KLawnCare
01-01-2006, 07:14 PM
what did kara seen????? lmao

UNISCAPER
01-01-2006, 07:17 PM
Did you know her sister Ob seen? and her brother Bad seen? And they had two cousins named Lee, Ug and Home Lee.

Guthrie&Co
01-01-2006, 10:13 PM
Re: Hey dickhead

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Your telling me to grow up? you need to take a look at yourself first. You must have the little dick syndrome. seems like your bullshit mouth makes up for what you lack elsewhere. go **** your mother or your father. which ever you please. dont forget about the goats either

Quote:
Originally Posted by C&KLawnCare your the muther___ that has mental issuse u stupid inbred bastard . Id love to see you talk this crap in front of me because your stupid brainless ass would stand up about 5 seconds till i pounded your ass into the ground grow up ya stupid cocksucker just grow the **** up


they have medication and hospitials for your mental issues. cb radio hahaha inbreed hahaha squeel like a pig. you have all of your teeth?


Yea he is all for it this is the crap from my pm box and more he goes the more pissed i get, Someone in NC knock the **** out of this 23 year old thats been in buisness 9 years ROFLMAO,

Talking about parents scaby is a good damn way to get knocked on your fat ass pal
Its 9 years experince not 9 in the business, your started the pm's so dont act like your innocent. blah blah blah you sure talk alot of hot air. Your pretty good entertainment. maybe you should quit the mowjobs and blowjobs and be a comedian

UNISCAPER
01-01-2006, 10:29 PM
"Re: Hey dickhead"

"maybe you should quit the mowjobs and blowjobs and be a comedian"

I went to college with a guy named Richard Head. If that was my name I would have to change it!

Guthrie&Co
01-01-2006, 10:33 PM
"Re: Hey dickhead"

"maybe you should quit the mowjobs and blowjobs and be a comedian"

I went to college with a guy named Richard Head. If that was my name I would have to change it!
I knew a guy in school with the name of Willie Naylor.
Well i am out for the night i have some designs to do.

lawnmaniac883
01-02-2006, 06:27 PM
This is ridiculous, GROW UP, or atleast act like you are.

UNISCAPER
01-02-2006, 06:42 PM
I refuse to grow up! In hopes that the eternal pissing match would end with humor, it looks like we are in for one of those 50 page posts describing the many ways those calling names can extend their manhood.....