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View Full Version : How many of you guys have your employees under workman's comp.?


ConPro
03-12-2003, 10:35 PM
This will be my first year with it. Touchy situation for some.

J&R
03-12-2003, 10:39 PM
Lucky i guess 10 years with on claims on my worker comp.

LAWNGODFATHER
03-13-2003, 12:45 AM
All my employees' are under WC.

Fantasy Lawns
03-13-2003, 01:12 AM
Fore Us if you have more than 3 hourly's you gotta have it ;->

grshppr
03-13-2003, 01:26 AM
Yep, I've got to have it on all employees. It is reasonably priced, 2.13%/$100.

Doc Pete
03-13-2003, 07:03 AM
Originally posted by LAWNGODFATHER
All my employees' are under WC.
My commerical accounts demand it. I just feel safer with it.
Pete

John Allin
03-13-2003, 07:39 AM
Professional landscapers have WC, and comply with the laws of their respective states.

Scrubs do not.

We all have choices......

Doc Pete
03-13-2003, 11:37 AM
Originally posted by John Allin
Professional landscapers have WC, and comply with the laws of their respective states.

Scrubs do not.

We all have choices......

The best solution would be for the Consumer to wake and realize WC is what they should demand for "Their safety", not ours.......
Pete

BRL
03-13-2003, 04:58 PM
"The best solution would be for the Consumer to wake and realize WC is what they should demand for "Their safety", not ours.......
Pete"

Uh Pete,
Here in NJ the consumers don't have to "wake up & demand it", the NJ Legislature has made it mandatory (for many years now). You must carry Wormen's Compensation insurance for all employees, and most if not all consumers know that already? If a consumer "demands it" they are most likely requesting a certificate from your insurance company that proves that you are not breaking the laws while working at their property. Each state has it's own regulations regarding this, so there may be different options posted in a thread here. From the NJ WC Web site, and those rules are basically the same for Corps etc.:

Sole Proprietorship – All sole proprietorships operating in NJ must obtain WC insurance or be approved for self-insurance as long as any one or more individuals, excluding the business owner, receives compensation for service. There are no exclusions for family members or minimum payroll.



http://www.nj.gov/labor/wc/insure.htm

BRL
03-13-2003, 05:08 PM
I just realized that it's possible you are a sole proprietor with no employees. If that is the case then I see where your comments are coming from in that perspective.

Mueller Landscape Inc
03-13-2003, 07:21 PM
Have it. Paying 22.2% per 100. No claims.

Doc Pete
03-13-2003, 09:17 PM
Originally posted by BRL
I just realized that it's possible you are a sole proprietor with no employees. If that is the case then I see where your comments are coming from in that perspective.

Hey, I agree with you. Anyone can type the LCO name at the NJ site, and if you ain't on it, you ain't got insurance. My point is that besides you and I know we need to have it, but the consumers think their "homeowners" will cover them if there's a problem. Errr.....No....... once the consumer pays (money) for work done, there homeowners won't cover them..........
So here's my name Pete O'Connor T/A "For Pete's Sake".... where's your's:D
Pete

Gr grass n Hi tides
03-16-2003, 06:56 PM
Workers comp is designed specifically so that "industries can clean up their own messes."

Working with mowers, line trimmers, chemicals, etc., is hazardous, so what happens if you have a guy in the field who gets hurt and you DO NOT have comp coverage is that you and/or your company gets sued.

The injured guy might be a dedicated worker, nice person, and have every great quality you could list; however, what if he's 25 years old, chops off half his foot & has a life time impairment. Then he has no choice but to pursue a claim, which could be huge and thus you could lose your company. The guy might not have a choice in the matter if he's trying to put groceries on his family's table. Plus, I don't think any of us would want something bad to happen and have no way to help take care of it.

The solution is pay for comp coverage (or use a temp agency because they pay for their own comp). Your State's Industrial Commission handles the claim, pays for medical treatment, pays out (in N.C. anyway) lost wages at 2/3, and if a severe injury is involved will "clinch" a final settlement with the individual.

Whoever you have your mowing contract with, they want you to have the comp so they don't have any exposure if an accident happens (during the course of your normal business). The 25 yo with 1/2 foot chopped off scenario - he would probably probably be forced to try and bring in the property owner too, which they are well aware of.

Employers might complain about paying for comp, but that's part of it. The alternative is not really an alternative at all.

BB36
03-16-2003, 07:26 PM
All have comp. 3.64 per $100