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Boltzie
03-18-2003, 09:17 AM
I have a lawn care book that talks about placing an annual top dressing of pete/loam/sand blend. It states that most lawn care professionals place top dressing and it is recommended for a homeowner.

Does anyone place a top dressing every year? I haven't seen it done in my development where most yards are taken care of by professionals. Is this soil dumped out of a truck on the lawn and spread thin?

Thanks,
Dan

Lombardi
03-18-2003, 10:49 AM
I have never heard of that in my area. It sounds like another gimmick to increase revenue.

timturf
03-20-2003, 05:19 PM
A good topdressing with organic matter is very benefical to lawn.
Helps build the soil and smooth out lawn. Labor intense. How about applying a quality natural organic fertilizer!

check out espoma

David Haggerty
04-04-2003, 07:21 AM
I went to the CENTS show in Columbus a couple of years ago.
A LOT of the booths there had some kind of topdressing they offered.
So I bought a little Earth-N-Turf 1/2 cu yd topdresser.

I applied it to two lawns, about 5 acres total.


Gaw-w-wd!! What an improvement. (I have pictures)
And these lawns already had first class weed & feed program in place!

It's something Golf courses and pro turf fields have always done.
It's just now coming into the commercial lawn market.
I have GOT to get a bigger topdresser.

I don't see why you couldn't apply topdressing with a pull behind spreader if you cut the topdressing with enough sand to make it flow.

Check out this website on topdressing:
http://www.sandmantopdressing.com/topdressing.htm

Dave

Green Pastures
04-04-2003, 11:59 AM
I used an organic topdressing on several lawns last fall and have been extremely impressed with the results.

It was a humus blend. Actual ingredients are treated human waste and yard clippings and leaves all ground up and left in piles to "ferment"! :D

It was some strong smelling stuff till the first rain, BUT it did NOT smell like human waste. It smelled like really fertile dirt, had a very earthy organic smell.

I had 1" put down on all grassy areas. The lawns I did this on last fall are BY FAR the best looking lawns I service so far this year.

Even the neighbors are commenting how much better the lawns look than theirs and have already scheduled more jobs for next fall. The flowering trees on the properties (in the lawn) had way more blooms on them than the exact same trees on the un-treated lawns in the same neighborhood.

Very pleased with the results.

jason r.
04-04-2003, 09:38 PM
Scott,
How did you apply the topdressing?

Green Pastures
04-05-2003, 09:47 AM
Jason, check your PM box.

jason r.
04-05-2003, 03:55 PM
Scott, thanks for the PM. It really looks like you got you stuff together. I really enjoy reading your posts.

David Haggerty, how do you like your Earth n Turf. I was checking out their website and they look very interesting. I'm looking for something to spread a thin layer of river sand on props. Do you think a tow behind spreader could accomplish this?

David Haggerty
04-06-2003, 04:49 PM
jason r

I'm really pleased with the spreader. I think it'll spread coarse river sand. That's one of the chores I bought it for. I'm sure it'll work OK, but I havn't tried it for that yet.

It's really well built. It even has high speed tires and bearings so you can trailer it to the site. The Earth-N-Turf spreader definitely deserve a look if you're considering a top dresser.

Dave

SystemXpert
04-11-2003, 11:08 AM
Annual Todressing ?

It depends on how big your yard is and how much you want to work. Mine is only 8,000 sqft, so it only takes about 4-6 hours to topdress by hand.

I experimenting with using a combination of those pelletized compost pellets mixed with dry sand that can be done from a spreader.

Waiting until this fall with I aerate again.

timturf
04-11-2003, 03:24 PM
why are we topdressing with sand?

SystemXpert
04-11-2003, 06:54 PM
2 Reasons I'm adding some sand.

1. My soil is has alot of clay.

2. I'm meant to say RiverSand. The folks at Lesco told me it was the best thing to use.

Am I wrong ?

Green Pastures
04-11-2003, 09:35 PM
I would add an organic topdressing as opposed to sand. The organic material will break up the sand some as well as give you some natural fertilizer.

The organic topdressing I use is a combination of treated human waste and recycled yard waste, (mulched leaves, grass clippings, hardwood bark) it smells a little strong at first but not at all like human waste smells. It just smells really earthy and fertile.

I was AMAZED at the results from using it last fall as a supplement to aeration and seeding.

The two yards I used it on are by far my best looking yards this spring.

Edited to say it's called "Nutragreen" here in my area. Great stuff.

David Haggerty
04-12-2003, 05:27 AM
Originally posted by Green Pastures
Edited to say it's called "Nutragreen" here in my area. Great stuff.

They call it Com-Til at the city of Columbus OH

It's made from sewage sludge also. This must be a more crude product than what's available to you. It has a high ammonia content. It makes the grass grow like crazy though.
Some local nurseries buy it, regrind and mix it with other stuff and resell it for more money. It just looks like more money for less potency to me. But this could only be applied at 1/4" or less or it'd give the lawn a chemical burn.

I might try blending my own. Maybe with 1/3 coarse river sand. I understand the sand will loosen the soil to give better water absorption.

Dave

timturf
04-12-2003, 08:40 AM
when adding sand to soil, you need @70 to 80% sand, or you end up with concrete!

Just use organic material, it will help loosen and build soil!

65hoss
04-18-2003, 04:08 AM
I topdress with compost only. NO SAND. As stated before, sand and clay make concrete. In a few years go try to aerate where you put sand. Compost helps to change the soil structure. The organic matter makes the grass an extremely dark rich green. Customers have been very pleased with the results.

cross1933
05-20-2008, 09:31 AM
Anyone have links to equipment that can be used to spread compost? This for a my home yard use.

LarryF
05-20-2008, 09:56 AM
I

Check out this website on topdressing:
http://www.sandmantopdressing.com/topdressing.htm

Dave

Dave. That website doesn't take me anywhere.

Marcos
05-20-2008, 11:33 AM
Anyone have links to equipment that can be used to spread compost? This for a my home yard use.

I use a fairly large manure spreader, something similar to this in the fall, on the soccer fields, and on the larger residentials I take care of :

http://www.countrymanufacturing.com/manurespreaders.htm?gclid=CNa6pouutZMCFQqFGgodYm4WCw

However, on the smaller residentials, or other turf areas with lots of 'obstacles' :cry: in the way, ..we still do it via wheel barrel, dumping compost into small piles, then raking to about 3/4" depth...after the lawn's been pretty much scalped compared to normal mowing height, of course, so we can see exactly "what we're doing" a little better, and not have to 'fight' through the grass with the rakes nearly as much.

On the bigger lawns using the manure spreader...we often have to make sure the ground's good and firm before we go in with such a (potentially cumbersome and hard-to maneuver, in certain spots) tractor/ wagon combo.
Sometimes this means I'll have to delay any scheduled aeration until after the composting is completed; depending upon what nature throws our way, if the site's not set up with an irrigation system.
Soccer fields are a piece of cake. :) No obstacles whatsoever.

But with the especially heavy clay around here...aeration in conjunction with compost topdressing is vital, especially on heavily sloped areas of turf, because of the possibility of the compost 'sheet washing' :cry: right off the lawns, and into the sidewalk / street, during heavy rains.

Kind of expensive for a homeowner to buy, though.
Maybe you can call around...and RENT something like this to pull behind your lawn tractor ?

cross1933
05-20-2008, 11:55 AM
I use a fairly large manure spreader, something similar to this in the fall, on the soccer fields, and on the larger residentials I take care of :

http://www.countrymanufacturing.com/manurespreaders.htm?gclid=CNa6pouutZMCFQqFGgodYm4WCw

However, on the smaller residentials, or other turf areas with lots of 'obstacles' :cry: in the way, ..we still do it via wheel barrel, dumping compost into small piles, then raking to about 3/4" depth...after the lawn's been pretty much scalped compared to normal mowing height, of course, so we can see exactly "what we're doing" a little better, and not have to 'fight' through the grass with the rakes nearly as much.

On the bigger lawns using the manure spreader...we often have to make sure the ground's good and firm before we go in with such a (potentially cumbersome and hard-to maneuver, in certain spots) tractor/ wagon combo.
Sometimes this means I'll have to delay any scheduled aeration until after the composting is completed; depending upon what nature throws our way, if the site's not set up with an irrigation system.
Soccer fields are a piece of cake. :) No obstacles whatsoever.

But with the especially heavy clay around here...aeration in conjunction with compost topdressing is vital, especially on heavily sloped areas of turf, because of the possibility of the compost 'sheet washing' :cry: right off the lawns, and into the sidewalk / street, during heavy rains.

Kind of expensive for a homeowner to buy, though.
Maybe you can call around...and RENT something like this to pull behind your lawn tractor ?

I am considering,http://www.emeraldseedandsupply.com/lawn/index.html

Marcos
05-20-2008, 12:15 PM
I am considering,http://www.emeraldseedandsupply.com/lawn/index.html

That thing looks pretty neat.

It weighs 24 pounds, empty.
My guess is when you fill it up with moist compost (still wet from the ongoing decomposition process), it'll weigh closer to 40 #.

With that in mind I sure hope your lawns relatively level , and / or that you're a weight lifter !!
:cool2:



The openings around the cylinder are 1/4" x 1/2" according to the specs.

If you're getting BULK compost delivered (....which is usually, by far the better value vs. bagged compost, when you look at your cost / yard )
you'd want to make sure that your compost provider KNOWS that you'll be running your compost through a 1/4" screen, so that they can run it through their processor again, if need be, before it's dumped on your drive or wherever.
Otherwise, you may end up with some "balls" of compost you'll have to try to break up. Yes...this happens in bagged compost, too !

People who buy compost, bagged OR bulk, for landscape uses, often aren't quite as 'picky' about compost particle size.
:waving:

cross1933
05-20-2008, 02:37 PM
I will be ordering Soil Pro+ Organic from,http://www.844dirt.com/dirt.htm.

I used topsoil from there last year when I reseeded the backyard. I asked for the dry pulverized soil and was pleased with the soil delivered. I think it was around $145 for 3 yards delivered.

I will try to hook this on the back of my lawn tractor, my weightlifting days are over.

Marcos
05-20-2008, 06:49 PM
I will be ordering Soil Pro+ Organic from,http://www.844dirt.com/dirt.htm.

I used topsoil from there last year when I reseeded the backyard. I asked for the dry pulverized soil and was pleased with the soil delivered. I think it was around $145 for 3 yards delivered.

I will try to hook this on the back of my lawn tractor, my weightlifting days are over.

Wow...Maybe run a pan through that to see if there's maybe some gold dust included too, that you didn't know about.
:usflag:


Around here, retail wise, the going rate for decent compost delivered from an Ohio state certified composting facility is typically between $24-$29 / yard (after any 'discount coupons' factored in), with the supplier usually requiring 3 or 4 yards minimum per delivery.

cross1933
05-21-2008, 07:54 AM
Wow...Maybe run a pan through that to see if there's maybe some gold dust included too, that you didn't know about.
:usflag:


Around here, retail wise, the going rate for decent compost delivered from an Ohio state certified composting facility is typically between $24-$29 / yard (after any 'discount coupons' factored in), with the supplier usually requiring 3 or 4 yards minimum per delivery.

Quote from another local company,
Mushroom compost - 3 x 31.99
Delivery - 30.00
IL sales tax - 6.72
Total delivered - $132.69

Marcos
05-21-2008, 04:13 PM
Quote from another local company,
Mushroom compost - 3 x 31.99
Delivery - 30.00
IL sales tax - 6.72
Total delivered - $132.69

My guess is that they'd very readily drop the $30 delivery fee completely...if you were to "up" the order to, say, having 5 yards delivered.

Negotiate with them. They're farmers at heart. They're used to it.

The general rule of thumb is that 1 yd will topdress 1000 sq ft of lawn at about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch thick.

But don't forget that you'll probably need some for any flower / vegetable garden project you may have.