PDA

View Full Version : Is this flyer good?


LawnMowerMan2003
04-03-2003, 09:39 PM
This is my new flyer. It's pretty basic because I made it in Word. I didn't really have any other software to use. What do you think?

LB Landscaping
04-03-2003, 10:47 PM
Kind of plain, can you add some color to spruce it up?? The content is pretty good, can you shrink it to fit one page???

LawnMowerMan2003
04-03-2003, 11:38 PM
I could add some color. Do you know how much color copies are running now? I haven't checked in a while, but they used to be kind of expensive. I printed it out on one page on my computer.

Clay
04-04-2003, 12:44 AM
LawnMowerMan,

I bet you have no idea how good that really is... :-)

Clay

LawnMowerMan2003
04-04-2003, 01:20 AM
Clay:

Should I take that as a compliment? :)

Some people say the dependable thing is uncreative, but I put that first, because 99% of the time if I talk to a new customer and they say "I had a lawn service, but..." it usually comes down to them not being dependable. So I thought maybe I could take the business from some scrubs, and not have to make a special trip out to the house if the customer thinks I'm not worth the extra money, cause the estimate will already be on their door. By putting a space for a "first cut" charge I can eliminate those people wanting me to cut a jungle for $25 or $30 and then not call me again (since I don't require contracts). I don't know what my response rate will be, but most of the leads should be good ones.

LawnLad
04-04-2003, 01:22 AM
Superior -

What sets you apart from your competion? "Superior" implies something... I take it to be a statement on quality. You talk about your personal characteristics - but what about your services. You simply state you'll make their lawn look "nice".

You've got the feature/benefit statements down pat. How about a simpler listing of your services with a brief statement of how the customer will be treated essentially answering the question, "Why you should hire Superior Cut Lawn Service"

Are all the properties you service the same size? If not - how can you offer a fixed price on fertilizing?

A second thought - with no contracts required, what's to keep someone from taking you up on a one cut and inexpensive fertlizer application and then cancel service. What if then they claim damage to their property from your application? For a small job you bought a lot of liability. A contract can limit your liability.

A thought... if you want to offer an incentive to buy - offer a free bag of mulch (cost you $3.00) or a % off the first visit.

Lastly - by letting the customer call you when they want their lawn cut - what happens when you quote $xx assuming you'll be spending 30 minutes cutting the lawn, but you show up after 3 weeks of growth and it takes you 1.5 hours? By letting the customer dictate how you service their property you are not holding yourself out to be the professional.

Don't be afraid to be the professional and tell the customer what will be best for their lawn. After all, if they're hiring a Superior lawn service, are they hiring knowledge/quality or are they hiring someone who is superior at cutting the lawn within 48 hrs?

Since I don't know your business these are just some thoughts, shots in the dark if you will. Good luck with picking up new customers this spring.

LawnMowerMan2003
04-04-2003, 01:50 AM
Lawnlad:



"What sets you apart from your competion? 'Superior' implies something... I take it to be a statement on quality. You talk about your personal characteristics - but what about your services. You simply state you'll make their lawn look 'nice'."

OK, I see that "nice" is rather vague, but how should I elaborate on the quality?

"Are all the properties you service the same size? If not - how can you offer a fixed price on fertilizing?"

The properties won't be exactly the same size, but I'm mostly targeting small lawns now, due to my current 21" mower limitation.

"A second thought - with no contracts required, what's to keep someone from taking you up on a one cut and inexpensive fertlizer application and then cancel service. What if then they claim damage to their property from your application? For a small job you bought a lot of liability. A contract can limit your liability."

That's a good point, but I still shouldn't be losing money on the fertilizer. I won't make much, but it's quick and easy. As far as the liability for fertilization, I'm more concerned about that. Do you think I should rewrite it "no long-term contracts required"? Or have the customer sign a waiver if they want fertilization?

"what happens when you quote $xx assuming you'll be spending 30 minutes cutting the lawn, but you show up after 3 weeks of growth and it takes you 1.5 hours?"

Maybe this isn't clear in the flyer, but I covered this by the "call within 3 days of _____ "< The date goes in that space.

"Don't be afraid to be the professional and tell the customer what will be best for their lawn. After all, if they're hiring a Superior lawn service, are they hiring knowledge/quality or are they hiring someone who is superior at cutting the lawn within 48 hrs?"

You think this is unclear? What would you suggest to improve?

adrianvbarrera
04-04-2003, 10:15 AM
LawnLad,

I commend you on your critique. It is rather harsh but it will BENEFIT Superior Lawns. The best critique comes from your competition.....second best is one from a fellow LCO at Lawnsite.com.


We need more crtiques like this one.


Keep up the good work.

Adrian

Clay
04-04-2003, 10:24 AM
MowerMan,

Yes, it was meant as a compliment.... :-)

While the flier is a little unpolished, you have naturally included some of the basic steps a good advertisement should have...

Get Attention
Show People An Advantage
Prove It
Persuade Them To Grasp This Advantage
Ask For Action

Just a few quick suggestions...

Either ditch the tractor logo altogether or get a modern mower to use in its place.

Try something like this for the headline...

Announcing A "Superior" Way To "Jump Start" Your Home's Curb Appeal While Creating More Free Time And One Less Headache!

Then, as LawnLad mentioned, the number one customer question to answer is "What's in it for me?"

You can simply accomplish this by rewording the "We are's" to "You get".... Get it??? :-)

You see, you naturally covered most of the basics....
You got attention with the headline.... showed an advantage with being depandable... proved it with experience... persuaded them to grasp your advantage by mowing within 48 hours.... asked for action by calling today and receive a reward...

While it is far from a polished professioinal flier, you see that you covered all the bases as outlined by some of the most successful marketers of all time.... You're a natural.... :-)

Good Luck, Clay

If you would like, you can email questions clayvaughn@hotmail.com

LawnMowerMan2003
04-05-2003, 08:42 AM
OK, I am still waiting from a reply from lawnlad, but here is my first revision. Thanks for the advice so far.

I want to do my best to get the best call response I can, because I'm going to be charging a little more than I have previously, after reading many posts here on the subject of prices. I used to think I should charge less to get more work, but now I'm starting to realize that it would be better to wait for the customers who pay more and won't go out and hire a scrub the next week, cause he does it cheaper. And, especially after reading some of the posts here on lowballers, I realize it's going to be a losing game to try to compete on price alone.

LawnLad
04-05-2003, 11:26 AM
Superior -

Your question about how to convey quality... I think to some degree it's assumed. Do people hire you to do something that is not a quality job? I think your revision words it better. You'll find what works for you over time as you experiment.

My recommendation would be to attend some garden shows and pick up some competitors flyers/brochures and see what you like and emulate some of what they use. Your costomer is most likely sophisticated enough that you don't have to spell out for them in detail - but can leave your presentation/marketing and ultimately your work to speak for itself.

Regarding the contract - I would recommend a working agreement. Make it a continuously renewing contract with no expiration with theability to cancel at any time with no penalty. And state that the customer can quit after one cut or 10 years if they like. The only reason you want their continued business is because they are satisfied with the work you do and they receive value for the dollars they have invested/spent with you.

The agreement would limit your liability, state your billing terms, state what happens if a check is returned NSF, etc. The agreement more or less gives the rules for how you will operate with the customer should a problem arise on either side. If you leave it open you're working with a verbal contract which is a recognized form of contract by the courts, but you open yourself up to potential problems if you ever wind up in court over something because courts tend to favor homeowners over contractor since it's assumed the business knows what they're doing.

It's a business decision as to how sophisticated you make your contracts and particularly in Ohio there are home solication laws that are pretty nuts... so it's a decision you make about how copmplicated or simple you want to make it. For simple lawn maintenance a "working agreement" may be enough to give confidence to your customer that you're professional and stand behind your work and give them the impression that you'll be there to serve them. Putting what you're going to do in writing makes a statement. Anyone can talk - but some how writing it out, particularly in contract form makes a customer trust you more before you even get started. So by advertising "No Contracts" I take it to imply the potential of "Fly by the night". Though this isn't the case - you're advertising it. You want the customer who looks for that security because they are less likely to try and take advantage of you then someone who is looking for that loosey goosey flexibility where they have a greater opportunity to take advantage. So, in summary I think you're advertisting/asking for trouble and inviting problems.

It's your choice as to what works best for you. There are many who don't use contracts and that's their choice. I choose not to use contracts on many jobs either, particularly the little ones for a neighbor of a customer where I don't think the paperwork is warranted or worth my time. I'm willing to take the risk. But I wouldn't advertise it. I'd talk with the customer about their preferences when I'm meeting with them face to face and I can decide before I offer the option of no contract if I'm comfortable with it before I decide to enter into it. I'm in the driver's seat in deciding what I'm going to do and what I'm not going to do.

Hope this helps... good luck.

LawnMowerMan2003
04-05-2003, 01:20 PM
Thanks again for the help. I see your point about people taking advantage of no contract, and I suppose they won't assume they need one, so I'm considering taking that part out. I'm going to post the final revision as soon as I finish, and update with the response I get. Hopefully this will be helpful to people just getting started. I remember my first flyer was made with a marker. :D

Meier
04-05-2003, 08:21 PM
If you're using a 21" mower, I would seriously re-consider the "no contract" part, especially combined with fertilizer and the "call me when you want it done" part.

If you fertilize and it rains (or they water) and if they let the grass grow three weeks before they call you, you'll be spending four hours on a lawn to earn 30 bucks.

All my opinion,
DFW, TX

LawnMowerMan2003
04-06-2003, 06:59 AM
I have removed the "no contracts", change the wording a little, and added a couple of pictures. I'll attach my latest copy. I printed 200 flyers yesterday, but haven't distributed any yet.

BTW, if the grass gets nice and thick the customer will just have to have me mow it more often, even though there is no contract forcing them to do this, I have handled this problem in the past by simply explaining that it takes me longer to cut and I have to either charge more or mow it more often, and the second choice is better for the customer as well as me, because the grass won't mulch as well if it's too long and won't look as good.

LawnMowerMan2003
04-06-2003, 07:22 AM
I forgot to attach the file. Notice how I am fishing for scrub's customers. I'll see if it works soon. I've only printed 200 so feel free to make more suggestions.

ronslawncare
04-07-2003, 09:47 PM
i think its not good,but could be worked on, because you are trying to mislead the public with 10 yrs experience than 12 yrs experience people will expect you to know what you are talking about.just be yourself. TRy this.

1.Name of your business
l2.logo
3.how about....... we can work with in your budget (instead of giving stuff away.
4.list all your services .
5.liscenced and insured somewere on there
6.instead of giving a price ,just say promptly given free estimates
7.serving ---- countys list cell# and office #
8.Call today for all your lawn and landscape needs.

my flyers is something like this.

LawnMowerMan2003
04-09-2003, 09:37 AM
Well, I was going to say over 10 years, and I changed it to 12. I started cutting grass when I was 15 and I'm 27 now.

I'm not sure if I can fertilize my average lawn (5000 square feet, I'm guessing) for $18 and make any money. I need to check fertilizer prices again.