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JimLewis
05-15-2003, 01:41 AM
What is the plant in the following picture? (not the maple or Nandina in back, the smaller ones in front, near the sidewalk.)

http://www.cybcon.com/~jimlewis/plant.jpg

Rtom45
05-15-2003, 10:09 AM
I can't see real well from the photo, but it looks like some kind of barberry to me. Is it woody, does it have dark bark, is it thorny?

JimLewis
05-15-2003, 11:52 AM
No, it's definitely not a barberry. I am familiar with all of the different types of them. Not even similar when you look closer.

Here is a close-up shot. It looks almost more like a perennial, but it could be a shrub I guess too. They say it produces purple flowers.

http://www.cybcon.com/~jimlewis/plant2.jpg

Green in Idaho
05-15-2003, 07:56 PM
aaahhhh? One of the Hebe varieties maybe...?

This one doesn't look like the exact, but check with this nursery in your neck of the woods and send them the photo.

http://www.siskiyourareplantnursery.com/

See hebe purple

JimLewis
05-16-2003, 01:21 AM
YES! I think you are correct! A good friend of mine (fellow landscaper) thought the same thing earlier today. And it makes sense because the client told me that it gets purple flowers in the summer. So I think it's one of the purple Hebe plants.

Green in Idaho
05-16-2003, 03:07 AM
Do I win anything?
But actually I'm not positive. But that nursery specializes in unique plants and if you are seeking more like your photo samples, they might be the best source in your area, even though I know NOTHING about your area..
:p:rolleyes:

JimLewis
05-16-2003, 01:27 PM
You win an all expenses paid trip to a local restaurant for drinks and talk about landscaping! (Travel to Tigard, OR not included. Not valid with any other promotional offer. See store for details. )

:D :D :D

hubb
05-16-2003, 02:34 PM
This plant is known as "Smokebush" or "Smoke Tree". Otherwise known as "Cotinus Coggygria"
According to what I've found its actually a tree that most people prune back to the ground each year so that it stays low growing and produces flowers in the early summer.
I found it in a "Better Homes and Garden" complete guide to gardening book that I have.
If you have any more questions about it just e-mail me and I'll get back with you.
Hope this helps.
Dave

Green in Idaho
05-16-2003, 02:45 PM
Dude! Cotinus Coggyria is a TREE! Grows 8-10' High!

Again, I am not positive about the earlier ID but I am sure it is NOT continus coggyria (smoke tree)! Leaf pattern is totally different, color, stem, flowers, etc.

JimLewis
05-16-2003, 05:55 PM
Yah, I am familar with the smoke tree too. This isn't that. I am pretty sure it's a Hebe.

Green in Idaho
05-16-2003, 06:41 PM
Jim, that nursery is right there in Oregon. Have you had a chance to confer with them?

JimLewis
05-16-2003, 07:05 PM
I can't even get their website to come up. Some error about cookies aren't turned on. But they ARE turned on. I've tried it in both IE and Netscape. The website just isn't working or something. I can't get past the error page to find out anything about them.

hubb
05-16-2003, 10:29 PM
Yeah I think you guys are right. I looked at the picture a little more closely and it is different. Sorry, my mistake.

Georgiehopper
05-17-2003, 08:30 PM
It is Hebe 'Autumn Glory'

Rtom45
05-19-2003, 10:12 AM
According to Wymann's encyclopedia, Hebe is native to New Zealand. They grow outdoors in zones 7 - 9, but can be grown in pots and moved into greenhouses in colder climates. Wymann goes on to say that this group of plants is mostly used in California. The encyclopedia lists 7 different species, but says there are many more.

iclgs
05-20-2003, 06:10 PM
Definetly a Hebe!! I grew up in New Zealand......Trust me that is a hebe!

Turfdude
05-21-2003, 09:21 PM
Hebe -jebe - never saw anything like it in Jersey!

Georgiehopper
05-22-2003, 01:51 PM
Its not hardy in Jersy.. :-)

BigJim
05-23-2003, 10:20 AM
If its a Hebe they need a good feed!.Hebes are evergreens,other than the coloured leaf varieties they are generally all dark green.Theres 100's of varities of them,they are natives here,but many of the new varieties are bred in Europe where the use them as house plants.Photo of Autumn Glory(or Beauty in some books) below.