PDA

View Full Version : Buying new skid steer


f16fxr
06-06-2003, 02:18 PM
First time user.

First, this is a great site, and there is a lot of info here.

I'm leaning toward a track model just for the smoothness of ride when I spend a lot of time in the cab. I've rented an ASV RC-50 and I really liked it. Just wondering how the others match up or if putting tracks on a wheeled skid steer would be close to the same.

Thanks
:help:

ksss
06-25-2003, 01:32 AM
I have run the T190 and a Takeuchi 130. The 130 was a far better running machine than the Bobcat. The Bobcat was loud especially when the machine was pushed over relief which was often. The controls on the Bobcat are not servo assisted and required much more effort to operate. The 130 had none of the problems the Bobcat had. I can see where the tracks have value in some situations (I have rented them to grade basement floors). Out where I am at however I can't justify the added cost of the tracks up front and the increased cost per hour over a tired machine (it never rains here and it is very rocky). Being from Minnesota however, that would probably be different for you. I have never run an ASV. However in talking to different dealers in this area they don't bring much trade value. The upkeep on the running gear is expensive and there is little demand in this area for the machines (so I am told). Good luck.

JohnatAllBrite
07-17-2003, 03:30 PM
A personal opinion: I have a Kubota L-35 TLB, & a 2000 Bobcat 773 w/heated cab...Outside of using the bobact for snow removal (which it is great for) i HATE THE MACHINE! Gets stuck easy, horrible on hilly terrain. I have only 100 hours on it at the present time, try using it at home from time to time, but always end up cursing it & climbing back on the kubota. They are great for tight places, but..... I think I would have rather gotten an articulated rubber tire loader in the 8,ooo lb class.

JohnatAllBrite
07-17-2003, 03:33 PM
A personal opinion: I have a Kubota L-35 TLB, & a 2000 Bobcat 773 w/heated cab...Outside of using the bobact for snow removal (which it is great for) i HATE THE MACHINE! Gets stuck easy, horrible on hilly terrain. I have only 100 hours on it at the present time, try using it at home from time to time, but always end up cursing it & climbing back on the kubota. They are great for tight places, but..... I think I would have rather gotten an articulated rubber tire loader in the 8,ooo lb class. At least with the L-35 you can also use the loader & the back hoe at the same time.

DaddyRabbit
07-18-2003, 12:06 AM
With all due respect, I wouldn't look twice at the ASV machines. The under carriage is rather "whimpy" and can and probably will de-rail it'self on a hill w/a full bucket of dirt riding sideways. The ASV has a very nice ride as a CaT does but that "cheap" feeling starts to gravitate after some seat time in the ASV. I have run all out there and the one I like is the Gehl CTL series. It is made by Takahashi and brother to Mustang as well. The track design is supurb and has vertical path lift to boot. All machines come w/hand servo controls.

NNJLandman
07-18-2003, 12:22 AM
We Run a Mustang 2120 i believe. Runs great, no problems, gets the job done. Great work horse.

Dan's lawn care
07-18-2003, 03:54 PM
My Dad has 95 case 1854c and i love it. Plus he just bout a 01 case 75xt I hate it. the only thing i like is that it has power and it is a dsl sucker

clamcooker
08-12-2003, 08:21 AM
I would go with the RC-50. Undercarriages don't seem weak to me, asv supplies all of Caterpillars's undercarriages and they don't seem to be a company that would buy weak components. I have run RC-50 a few times and know some owners, everyones raves about it.

ksss
08-15-2003, 03:00 AM
Don't let the Cat logo blind you. The ASV running gear is great for a well defined type of enviroment. However work out side that with an ASV or CAT track skid steer and it will cost dearly. It is a very soft, smooth riding system. The problem is it is high maintainence. I have pondered an RC30 for strictly working on established yards and very tight areas. With two other wheeled machines I can be assured of not having to use it where it doesn't belong. I think as long as the user understands the limits of the system and the upkeep costs there is no problem. But to think that because CAT has a hand in it, makes it "all good" that thinking will be expensive.

Qualey
08-17-2003, 01:48 PM
The ASV is not high maintenance. You tighten the tracks upon break in, change fluids on a regular basis and keep the pivot points lubed. The problem with the machines is that they allow one to get into positions a skid steer could never achieve. Underskilled operators can cause damage in these situations as they are not used to the capabilities of the loader. We have a 4810 and a 4500 and will never buy another skid steer. For what its worth, we have used these things on extreme granite slopes along the coast with loaded buckets and 3500 lb pallets and NEVER thrown a track. Same goes for winter frozen woods terrain in lot clearing jobs. Only problem I have is high cost and Southworth Milton's poor dealer service.

Matt

Strawbridge Lawn
10-18-2003, 12:40 PM
I will be renting an rc-30 soon. Talked to the guys who rent them and they have had no problem with them. I think even a CAT machine has an ASV undercarriage so I am hestitant to think they are weak in this area with an affiliation with CAT. Anyone with real bad news on these?

Randy Scott
10-18-2003, 10:34 PM
I think if you don't have a skidsteer yet, I would get a wheeled machine first, then add a tracked machine when you have enough work that can be dedicated for it's intended use. Depending on the work you do, you will limit yourself to what you can and should really use that machine for. I know we spend a lot of time on roads when doing lawn installations and laying sod etc.. Loading and unloading the trucks and trailers at jobsites. Accessing from the street and so forth. A track machine will take a pounding in this setting. Although the tracked machines are relatively new to this industry, most guys around here are getting about two years on the tracks and idlers, etc.. After that time they are needing replacement and serious maintenance due to wear. This results in about a $4000 bill to go through the drivetrain and replace the tracks. I just replaced tires on our skidsteer and it was only $600. A lot less painful than $4000. I understand they are designed for different settings, but you need to figure out what will work for you. We are looking to add a tracked machine because they definately have their niche, we just aren't at that volume of workload for that machine quite yet. Probably by late next summer or early 2005. I know guys rave about the tracks for wheeled machines but they too are $3500 to $4000.

I guess YOU need to decide what the machine will really be used for to help you answer what type of machine to get. Good luck with it.

m&m
10-28-2003, 11:49 PM
get a rubber tired one.....you can buy tracks for it which are just as efficient from my experience....also, make sure you have enough "sidewall" so to speak on the tracks so tires dont climb out of the tracks when you are on an incline.....we have steel tracks which go over the tires....not a prob at all with em

kansas_turf_man
11-13-2003, 12:28 PM
I run a 2003 Bobcat A300, I love it, it has articulating wheels and every option available, I havent had a problem with it yet. I love the articulating wheels bacause i can drive on a lawn i just sodded a few minutes earlier and not hurt a thing.

Albemarle Lawn
11-23-2003, 09:02 PM
Love it.

I have the Cat 247, it goes all kinds of places a skidsteer gets stuck.

xcopterdoc
11-24-2003, 07:54 PM
I agree.. get a wheeled one first. I can tell ya first hand that the track machine parts are expensive, no matter what brand. We have 5 Bobcats and one JD 260 and I'll tell ya.. for the money, the JD is a good machine. We have 1300 hrs in 2yrs on it and only minor adjustments, couple of minor repairs. Like a loose/broken hose clamp and a broken spring on the left side parking brake assy.

kris
12-27-2003, 05:53 PM
Originally posted by JohnatAllBrite
I have only 100 hours on it at the present time,

Man ... 100 hours. How or why would you keep it around then? Awful expensive. We also have 5 bobcats and a Kubota, articulate steering with a small backhoe attachment...the kubota is for sale because we only put on 275 hours last season. With the exception of a MT-50 all our other machines are in the 12-1500 hour range per season....short season here. We get absolutely impeccable service from the dealer that keeps us coming back.

UNISCAPER
01-18-2004, 04:16 PM
If you guys are complaining about the high cost of track maintenance, it is largley because you are not recovering enough in your usage charges to compensate. All track drive loaders have projected wear time, and your dealer should provide you with a usage/wear guide so you get back what was taken.


We have had an ASV 30 for 2.5 years, 2500 hours, just gettign ready for an undercarriage/tracks. We have a 935 Cat track drive crawler loader with a 4 in one bucket. It will go 10,000 hours before tracks are needed.

Also have Cat 246 skid steer, which wears tires every 500 hours. Tracks have definite advantages over tires, but you need to charge for them accordingly.

If you don't have the money for replacement when it comes time, you are working too cheap, and need to review your numbers. And don't let competiton dictate to you what you charge...Your company should have it's own numbers.