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plowboy81
06-15-2003, 12:33 PM
I live in NC. We use wheat straw. I really can get it for $3.00 per bale but I figured that would really make you guys ask questions. If you put seed down, you had better use straw or something or it WILL NOT grow, believe me.

This was suppose to go with the "help with raking and seeding"

JB1
06-15-2003, 12:50 PM
we have a lot of wheat field around here $1.50 per bale.

ffemt1271
06-15-2003, 12:52 PM
i take all of the pine straw i remove and run it thru a friends square baler--bale of straw=$0

plowboy81
06-15-2003, 12:57 PM
This post was originally suppose to be a reply, but since your here I'll ask. Is that $1.50 if you get it out of the field or is that already up in the barn? I also farm, but I don't cut wheat. The farmers I know sale it to me for $1.75 if I get it up. I really don't have the space to stock up. Another guy sales it ot me for $2.00 per bale until he has no more because I always help him get it up for free.

rodfather
06-15-2003, 06:36 PM
Sorry, I NEVER use straw...you inject the possibility of weeds with the new seed. Best thing we do is core aerate and immediately broadcast the seed over the aerated area (and add in some starter fert as well). Works every time.:D

DLCS
06-15-2003, 06:45 PM
Ditto what RodFather said:)

awm
06-15-2003, 06:55 PM
i agree plowboy. straw spread properly,
double in the seed and plant at the proper time. i dont guarantee a stand,as thats just not the way i learned to do it.
no predicting mother nature. but im almost that sure ,and i dont have problems with much weed seed in wheat straw. but a caution , what works here wont necessarily work a hundred miles n or s of my area. i just know my area and i guess thats the name of the game.

plowboy81
06-15-2003, 07:00 PM
AWm,

Sounds to me like the norhtern boys do things differently than us rednecks. There is no way I can get grass to grow down here w/o putting down straw. Maybe it is so much hotter here than up there. I guess seeding up north all year is like us seeding in the fall. Maybe that is the difference.

Turf Medic
06-15-2003, 07:13 PM
Not to sound stooopid :blush: But what is pine straw?

fblandscape
06-15-2003, 07:14 PM
I thought hay or straw for $1.50 per bale is what horses and cattle eat? I was told that salt hay (grown in salt marshes) costs roughly $15 per bale. Shredded straw also goes for about $8 or $12 per bag. I can go to my nursery and double check that tomorow.

Turf Medic- Pine straw is what we northerners (Yankees in southern terminology) refer to as pine needles. They for some reason, don't ask me why... put it down in their planting beds in place of mulch a lot of times. :rolleyes:

tiedeman
06-15-2003, 07:21 PM
I also ditto Rodfather as well

ElephantNest
06-15-2003, 07:57 PM
A lot of people around my neck of the woods use pine straw for mulch. I personaly hate it, and it adds to much nitrogen to most gardens when decomposing. I think some of the logic is the fact that we have so many pine trees, that it will wind up in the bed anyway, covering whatever other mulch was there, unless cleaned out VERY regularly. We have no shortage of the stuff here, us LCOs wind up with bags and bags of it, most of it going to the curb. I use top grade cypress mulch for all of my gardens, unless a home owner can talk me out of it. But usualy, I can talk them into it.

GeorgiaGrassMan
06-15-2003, 07:58 PM
They for some reason, don't ask me why... put it down in their planting beds in place of mulch a lot of times.

A lot of the time? Almost all the time would be closer to the truth. Mulch is something you almost never saw in most of the South even 15 years ago. It's a relatively new thing here. Still, most people living in the South who are from the South (a minority these days it seems) use pine straw rather than mulch.

GeorgiaGrassMan
06-15-2003, 08:50 PM
They for some reason, don't ask me why... put it down in their planting beds in place of mulch a lot of times.

A lot of the time? Almost all the time would be closer to the truth. Mulch is something you almost never saw in most of the South even 15 years ago. It's a relatively new thing here. Still, most people living in the South who are from the South (a minority these days it seems) use pine straw rather than mulch.

plowboy81
06-15-2003, 09:11 PM
There is an enormous difference between hay and straw. Hay is what horses and cows eat. Hay is tall cut fescue, orchard grass, or young cut rye grass as well as many more different types. Straw is the stems left when you cut wheat, oats, or rye. I don't know of anyone down here who buys straw in a bag, never even seen it. We use pine needles in alot of our beds and around trees. We also use mulch but it depends on what the customer wants and what will go best with the surrounding landscape. Pine needles around here aren't but 3.50 per bale. I imagine alot of guys in Florida use them because alot of needles we get up here come from Florida. It takes about 70 bales of straw to cover one acre when seeding if it is blown. Takes a little more when hand shaking.

GeorgiaGrassMan
06-15-2003, 11:30 PM
They for some reason, don't ask me why... put it down in their planting beds in place of mulch a lot of times.

A lot of the time? Almost all the time would be closer to the truth. Mulch is something you almost never saw in most of the South even 15 years ago. It's a relatively new thing here. Still, most people living in the South who are from the South (a minority these days it seems) use pine straw rather than mulch.

ffemt1271
06-16-2003, 12:00 AM
TURF MEDIC pine straw is the "leaves"of a pine tree , ya know the needles.

1grnlwn
06-16-2003, 12:38 AM
True turf planted at the proper time and watered the proper amount will not need mulch (straw). Problem is left to the homeowner the ideal situation almost never occurs. Hence straw. Sure there will be some unwanted seeds, but are you telling me the yard won't have weeds when only 1/2-1/4 of the seeds expected to germinate do? And yea penmulch may work but it pretty pricey for 1/2 acre lots.

NCSULandscaper
06-16-2003, 12:39 AM
i wouldnt think of planting a new lawn and NOT use straw. as mentioned it just doesnt come up without it. And after all these years i have been on a farm and in business i have never had a problem with all the "weed" seeds that people say are in it. I have nothing but nice turf when im done with it.

GeorgiaGrassMan
06-16-2003, 12:44 AM
What is the proper amount of straw to use when seeding? I mean should it almost completely cover the ground or cover it completely or what? Bales per acre won't help me here because I won't be doing new lawns - just filling in bare spots.

NCSULandscaper
06-16-2003, 12:46 AM
Originally posted by GeorgiaGrassMan
What is the proper amount of straw to use when seeding? I mean should it almost completely cover the ground or cover it completely or what? Bales per acre won't help me here because I won't be doing new lawns - just filling in bare spots.


I spread so its a very thin layer just barely covering the ground. That way it decomposes quicker and you dont have to rake it out.

plowboy81
06-16-2003, 12:47 AM
When you put down straw, if for any reason you may get one or two blades of reseeding straw(wheat), then when you cut it, it will die out and only return green. I have never ever had a problem with seeds in the straw. The reason being is when the wheat is cut, the straw(stems) are beat around and any wheat that may not be caught in the combine(what we use to cut wheat) will fall on the ground and stay in the field. Then you go back and rake the straw(flip it over so it can dry out) at least once if not more depending on the rain. So if there is any wheat left in the straw, it has already fallen on the ground. Hope this explains the way we as farmers help you get the straw you use and clear up any fears you have of "ruining" a yard.

NCSULandscaper
06-16-2003, 12:58 AM
Originally posted by plowboy81
When you put down straw, if for any reason you may get one or two blades of reseeding straw(wheat), then when you cut it, it will die out and only return green. I have never ever had a problem with seeds in the straw. The reason being is when the wheat is cut, the straw(stems) are beat around and any wheat that may not be caught in the combine(what we use to cut wheat) will fall on the ground and stay in the field. Then you go back and rake the straw(flip it over so it can dry out) at least once if not more depending on the rain. So if there is any wheat left in the straw, it has already fallen on the ground. Hope this explains the way we as farmers help you get the straw you use and clear up any fears you have of "ruining" a yard.

Couldnt have explained it better myself. I have about 30 acres of fields, so next year im going to grow and cut my own straw and forget paying $2.50 a bale. I have the space to store it and i go through nearly a thousand bales a year.

mtdman
06-16-2003, 05:06 AM
I always use straw, very lightly, due to the fact that the homeowners are generally dense and don't understand that seed needs water to grow. In fact, I've taken to repeating myself about watering at least a dozen times. People just don't do it, and then I get blamed for the grass not growing. The straw helps to maintain the moisture in the soil and really does help the grass to germinate, I've found. This year, with all the rain we've had, every lawn I've planted has come up like crazy. I've also taken to adding the starter fertilizer to help the seed out, as well.

2 Questions:

DO you rake the straw out after the grass has grown or leave it?

and

I don't understand the aeration and seeding thing. I would think that seeding directly after an aeration would create a lumpy lawn, with all the plugs sitting on top. Does it come out evenly? I haven't done a whole lot of aerations, and never seeded after. Generally, I try to sell a dethatching and seeding together. That usually works well.

Thanks!
:D