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ant
07-03-2003, 06:44 PM
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ant
07-03-2003, 06:45 PM
2

ant
07-03-2003, 06:47 PM
3.
i fertilized it 6/16 with 25-3-10 1.25 fe. 25%scu at a rate of <3/4 lbs.n

ant
07-03-2003, 06:49 PM
4.
i think it is summer patch....:dizzy:
new client

Lawn Tek
07-03-2003, 07:00 PM
Looks like helminthosporium , but would like close up view of the grass blades . Also , I would not have used that high of N. this late

MOW ED
07-03-2003, 07:14 PM
dunno without seein up close but try this


http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/plantsci/landscap/pp950w.htm

ant
07-04-2003, 10:01 AM
close up

ant
07-04-2003, 10:02 AM
3

ant
07-04-2003, 10:03 AM
4

ant
07-04-2003, 10:09 AM
3

ant
07-04-2003, 10:19 AM
spoke to the homeowner and he informed me that he gets it each yr.
i feel it is summer patch

SWD
07-05-2003, 11:47 AM
Nope, what you have is Necrotic Ring Spot of which the causal agent is Leptospaeria korrae.
You have a classic case.

ChickensDoo
07-05-2003, 11:53 AM
Originally posted by SWD
Nope, what you have is Necrotic Ring Spot of which the causal agent is Leptospaeria korrae.
You have a classic case. I agree with SWD. We used to call this and Summer Patch the same thing, Fusarium Blight.....

GroundKprs
07-05-2003, 02:35 PM
"Fusarium Blight" was the stock answer for summer turf death in the 70s and 80s in our area. It was eventually discovered that the problem was generally not the Fusarium spp., but was usually summer patch (Magnaporthe poae) or necrotic ring spot (Leptosphaeria korrae).

If one of these is indeed the problem, you must have a long term overall cultural management strategy. You're not going to fix it when the symptoms express themselves in heat of summer, because the grass is already diseased. Main infections occur in fall and basically in spring. Death in summer is just unavoidable result of these infections. Daily syringing of infected turf will help it to survive.

Of course you need to know what it is, in order to manage it properly. Anyone who can look at a picture on a website and positively diagnose one of these two diseases is obviously a stellar individual with astounding powers. The scientists I have known and asked will venture a guess, but always insist on a laboratory diagnosis to tell for sure. And i've been sending them to labs since they could only tell me it was one of them, but couldn't ID which it was, LOL. Things are better today.

If you want to know a little more about the two, read last two docs at http://www.btny.purdue.edu/Pubs/#turf
And Fusarium is dealt with at http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r785100511.html and http://www.hort.uconn.edu/ipm/turf/htms/fusrntrf.htm and other places. Fusarium blight is active in hot weather.

Doesn't Rutgers have a diagnostic lab, ant?

ChickensDoo
07-07-2003, 01:47 AM
Originally posted by GroundKprs
"Fusarium Blight" was the stock answer for summer turf death in the 70s and 80s in our area. It was eventually discovered that the problem was generally not the Fusarium spp., but was usually summer patch (Magnaporthe poae) or necrotic ring spot (Leptosphaeria korrae).

If one of these is indeed the problem, you must have a long term overall cultural management strategy. You're not going to fix it when the symptoms express themselves in heat of summer, because the grass is already diseased. Main infections occur in fall and basically in spring. Death in summer is just unavoidable result of these infections. Daily syringing of infected turf will help it to survive.

Of course you need to know what it is, in order to manage it properly. Exactly.
Originally posted by GroundKprs
Anyone who can look at a picture on a website and positively diagnose one of these two diseases is obviously a stellar individual with astounding powers. Thanks for acknowledging my stellar powers. I am wishing the boss, my wife, and all my friends would acknowledge same. I think I was giving my best guess with the picture that was posted. Maybe you and some of your scientist buddies could possibly help some folks out (like the daily syringe thing), instead of trying to prove how smart you are.....
Originally posted by GroundKprs
The scientists I have known and asked will venture a guess, but always insist on a laboratory diagnosis to tell for sure. And i've been sending them to labs since they could only tell me it was one of them, but couldn't ID which it was, LOL. Things are better today. Thanks for the info. It is good to hear that scientists guess, too. In the mean time, this poor guy has to tell his customer something..... My advice would be to syringe it daily til Labor Day, then lets core aerate the s**t out of it and overseed with a good tall fescue. In the meantime, maybe you and your scientist buddies could maybe come up with the disease and a plan of your own.

loser135
07-10-2003, 09:23 PM
Just curious, what type of turf is it?

ant
07-10-2003, 09:45 PM
mainly blue grass

lugnut#6
07-10-2003, 10:04 PM
like the PGA commecial..."these guys are good"

GroundKprs
07-13-2003, 01:14 AM
Golly, sorry to bruise egos. NOT. If you want to shoot from the hip to show your expertise to the client, go right ahead. Any client wanting a quick fix is not interested in my services. I tried years ago to give the quick pat answers, and had to eat my words too many times.

99% of the success with any plants is based on cultural practices. Problems with most plants, especially turf, are usually caused by one or many improper cultural practices. Patch diseases on ornamental cool season turf will be best served by proper cultural practices, which may at times include chemical controls.

But if you have a specific problem, the very first step is to POSITIVELY IDENTIFY THE EXACT PROBLEM. In the case of patch disease in our area, this means a laboratory diagnosis today. So, when ant gets his lab results and posts those results, we can go back to intelligent discussion of a remedy or remedies.

ChickensDoo
07-13-2003, 11:04 AM
Originally posted by GroundKprs
Golly, sorry to bruise egos. NOT. If you want to shoot from the hip to show your expertise to the client, go right ahead. Any client wanting a quick fix is not interested in my services. I tried years ago to give the quick pat answers, and had to eat my words too many times.

99% of the success with any plants is based on cultural practices. Problems with most plants, especially turf, are usually caused by one or many improper cultural practices. Patch diseases on ornamental cool season turf will be best served by proper cultural practices, which may at times include chemical controls.

But if you have a specific problem, the very first step is to POSITIVELY IDENTIFY THE EXACT PROBLEM. In the case of patch disease in our area, this means a laboratory diagnosis today. So, when ant gets his lab results and posts those results, we can go back to intelligent discussion of a remedy or remedies. No ego bruised HERE, GK. Things may be a little harder to visually diagnose up north, but here its a little easier to 'shoot from the hip.' Its not always cut and dried, and most of the time, more than one disease is active at a time.

I ALWAYS prescribe corrective cultural practices to the homeowner for a long term solution, rather than just using a 'bandaid' chemical fungicide. Fungicides have their place. Like when you have pythium on a golf green, and if you're the superintendent, you damn well better be able to visually diagnose it and treat immediately or bye-bye green and bye-bye employment. How long does it take to get the results from your samples?

We have 300 customers and have applied one fungicide to date in 2003, five in all of 2002 (3 customers). We use a more natural approach to disease control, supplying plenty of organic matter on a regular basis, and offering aeration and overseeding with disease resistant turf varieties.

I'm not arguing with you GK, but I think most turf managers would agree that our profession is based on a PRACTICAL APPLICATION of science.....

The Lawn Crew
07-17-2003, 02:14 AM
CHIPCO 26019 Flowable at the heavier rate will make tremendous progress in knocking this out. Marked improvement in one week's time.

This comes from experience!

ericksonbrad@hotmail.com
07-23-2003, 02:34 AM
it is obviously necrotic ring spot or fairy ring, hence the clearly defined ring pattern in the photo. either way it is positively a fungi and would be treated the same way. shooting from the hip is hardly the case based on the clarity of the photo's you posted. i would bet a college agriculture dept would diagnose off these photo's as well, since they post there own photo's on the web as a guide for individuals who haven't been around enough to know what they are looking at. getting on with it now i can tell you that when there is an infestation this severe cultural practices might not be enough, or simply might take to long to achieve the desired results. if caught early enough aerate and fertilize and you'r problem might just go away, however if it persists you may want to use a fungicide in conjunction with aeration and fertilizer. as with any disease or weed infestation turf health is a major part of combating the problem, therefore it is essential to fertilize but not to overdo it since any extra stress to the lawn is how the disease or weeds take over in the first place. hope this helps LOL.

turf78
07-23-2003, 05:17 PM
Fungicide would help at this time but more importantly aerate every spring and fall 2 to 3 passes for the life of the lawn. Over seed with some perennial rye. Apply potash is late spring, 21-3-21. Let me guess, lawn is bluegrass and 2 to 5 years old and clay soil. (did not read above info just looked at picture). Its not fairy ring. It is in the Fusarium family.