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mikeklein
07-05-2003, 11:43 PM
Im from the commercial lawn care section,and do not know much about asphalt.We are going to lay a driveway at our house,160ft long X 12ft wide,plus a parking area of 25'X40'.If we go with concrete we will need about 30 yards,at$67.per yd,thats a bit pricey.Ive been told asphalt is much cheaper to lay.I do know if we decided on concrete,me and some friends could set up the forms and finish it ourselves,but is asphalt a do-it-yourself job?I do have access to a steam roller and a skid steer.Do I just call up the paving co. and order however many yards I need to be delivered,like you would do with ordering concrete?Fianally,does the mix have to be hot or can it be laid cold?Thanks for any help.---MikeK.

Grassmechanic
07-06-2003, 06:54 AM
Stick with the professionals when it comes to asphalt. It's too tricky to mess with for a homeowner. And yes, it has to be hot. Personally, I'd sick with concrete, it's cheaper in the long run. Just my $.02, though.

Mike

Mowingman
07-06-2003, 09:16 AM
Asphalt is sold by the ton. You would need to find out what one cubic yard of asphalt weighs and order by the ton. It really is not a do-it -yourself type project. It needs to be spread properly and rolled at the right time, temperature wise, to get a good solid surface. Also, your base has to be better for asphalt, than it does for concrete. Better hire a professional for asphalt paving.
One more thing. Do not hire one of those gypsy asphalt pavers. They do poor quality work and charge a fortune. They usually have shiny new trucks, nice equipment, and no permenant yard, shop,or plant facility in your area.:)

Personal Pride
07-18-2003, 10:35 PM
I use to work for an asphalt company for about 4 months, right out of high school. Believe me it is hard enough to get it right when everything is working properly and everyone knows exaclty what they are doing. As for the site prep, right on, The base has to be flawless and packed really well, or you will have cracks and potholes in no time, stick to reinforced concrete, if you have a friend in the business, buy what ever beer or food is necessary to get them to check everything over before the pour and then to let them finish it for you or at least have them dirrect your efforts.

Concrete if properly poured will last a lifetime in the driveway application, where no matter how well you take care of asphalt it will always fail sooner or later.

cat320
07-19-2003, 08:24 AM
concrete is great if you can afford it and if it's stamped it would look even better.Asphalt is cheaper like was said it will not last as long as concrete.Both can be done by you. cocncrete laid wet and asphalt done hot. what ever you choose the base has to be good and solid.concrete will have to be formed and screened asphalt put down with a spreader and then rolled.

Pelican
07-19-2003, 09:51 PM
I worked for a major blacktop company for a few years and I will echo mowingman's comments. When it comes to blacktopping, you get what you pay for. The lowballers know how to make 1" of asphalt appear as 3" and when it fails, they are no where to be found. We have a group in this area that change their company name almost every season to avoid lawsuits and their bad reputation.

Asphalt can be purchased by anyone with the means to haul it from the asphalt plant. It's sold in tons like has been mentioned and usually comes in 3 ton drops or more.

I don't feel this is a job for a do it yourselfer. To properly install asphalt, you need a solid base as has been mentioned and a paver, either a box type or dedicated machine. You also need a real roller, not the one ton unit you get at the rent-all center. That's for rolling out the lines of a heavier roller. The life span of the asphalt will depend on how it is installed and maintained, be aware oil or gas leaks on vehicles will deteriorate the asphalt and cause it to crumble.

cat320
07-20-2003, 10:49 AM
Pelicans right about the 1" being called 3" they just pack the sides up to give it the depth of more.That's why it good to be onsite when it's being done and to know how many tons you will need for a desired depth too.