PDA

View Full Version : Clover


KTNC
07-14-2003, 12:36 PM
My lawn has an abundance of clover every year at this time, is there any way to eliminate this? Will spraying work?

lawndreamer
07-14-2003, 12:37 PM
yup

Scraper
07-14-2003, 12:40 PM
Try the Homeowner forum or better yet, search. This most basic question has been answered more than once.

greenman
07-15-2003, 12:12 AM
If your lawn has an abundance of clover, it may be an indication of low nitrogen levels. What is your fert schedule, or do you?

mtdman
07-15-2003, 12:26 AM
Get a horse. I understand they dig the clover.

:D

Rustic Goat
07-15-2003, 02:58 AM
Proper fertilization and cutting a 'taller' than you may be used to, may take a season to really be effective, but it's certainly worked for me. Near passive weed control.

Phishook
07-15-2003, 03:17 AM
I agree with the Goat. Try raising the cutting height.

The clover likes the sun, so a thick lawn will slow it's growth and germination.

yardmonkey
07-15-2003, 12:03 PM
Clover (and other clover-like leguminous weeds) indicate low nitrogen in the soil. (The clover is trying to correct this). I have not seen this work, but have read that just increasing the nitrogen level, by fertilizing, should get rid of the clover. I would think that higher mowing height, as suggested above, would be helpful also.

As one who takes care of lawns for a living, I often have to have the mindset that clover is a weed and we need to eliminate it. But it is interesting to consider that not only did people not used to care if there was clover in their lawn, but they actually used to plant it with seed. I think even into the 1960's clover seed was included in lawn seed mixes! For some interesting discussion of that, see: The Lawn - A History of An American Obsession - by Virginia Scott Jenkins - published by the Smithsonian. Amazon link - http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1560984066/

Runner
07-15-2003, 02:03 PM
For this homeowner, you are not going to be able to go to home depo, or anywhere like this, and get some kind of "weed b gone", and take care of this clover. Find a good reputable company, (preferably a smaller on that knows what they are doing), and let them handle it. They should use Confront on it this time of year.

Chris Wagner
07-15-2003, 02:58 PM
Actually, I beg to differ that one can't find a product at their local garden center to get rid of clover.

If we need something quick, we pick up Ortho's liquid concentrate for clover, chickweed, and creeping charlie. We dilute it with water in a 2 gallon sprayer (for spot jobs).

I agree that regular herbicide products won't work well. Forget about the granular stuff for clover. But this works really well. Just make sure to get the clover pretty good... almost to run off.

A1 Lawn@Landscapes
07-15-2003, 04:23 PM
I have to strongly disagree with you reagarding not using anything granular on clover. Confront is available in granular form and with fert as well 18-2-9. The directions state that the lawn does not have to be wet for optimum results.Works wonders for me and I have read for others here as well. Reasonably priced as well

Grassmechanic
07-15-2003, 08:56 PM
Originally posted by yardmonkey
Clover (and other clover-like leguminous weeds) indicate low nitrogen in the soil. (The clover is trying to correct this). I have not seen this work, but have read that just increasing the nitrogen level, by fertilizing, should get rid of the clover. I would think that higher mowing height, as suggested above, would be helpful also.

As one who takes care of lawns for a living, I often have to have the mindset that clover is a weed and we need to eliminate it. But it is interesting to consider that not only did people not used to care if there was clover in their lawn, but they actually used to plant it with seed. I think even into the 1960's clover seed was included in lawn seed mixes! For some interesting discussion of that, see: The Lawn - A History of An American Obsession - by Virginia Scott Jenkins - published by the Smithsonian. Amazon link - http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1560984066/
Years ago (mid 60's) I remember a lawn in the neigborhood that was all clover. The guy mowed it down to around an inch, maybe lower. All of us kids loved to run on that lawn. The only green lawn in the middle of the summer. It was pretty neat.

Mike

yardmonkey
07-15-2003, 11:08 PM
I can remember lots of school playgrounds covered with clover when I was a kid.

One of my "little old lady" customers has a shady front yard with fescue (our shade grass in Oklahoma) and its getting a bit thin. I've been telling her I would like to overseed it this fall. Last week she said - "If any seed goes on that yard, there's going to be clover seed too." Meaning she will insist that I include clover seed.

Just got another super cool book in the mail today - Redesigning the American Lawn, published by Yale University Press. Makes the case that the 13 million acres of "industrial lawns" maintained in the US is enough to have a serious effect on the ecology of the planet. They advocate the "Freedom Lawn" - whatever grows under the mower blade is the lawn - no chemicals. Amazon -
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0300086946/

ULTIMATE LAWN
07-15-2003, 11:17 PM
You are correct yardmonkey.

We maintain several common areas for the city & a few residential accounts which have been deliberately seeded with Clover for use as a ground cover instead of grasses.

I have allways cut these areas at 2.75".

KenH
07-16-2003, 07:40 AM
It wouldnt look bad in lawns except for the white flowers......Thats the only way customers even know it is there.

LAWNGODFATHER
07-16-2003, 07:34 PM
Originally posted by ULTIMATE LAWN
You are correct yardmonkey.

We maintain several common areas for the city & a few residential accounts which have been deliberately seeded with Clover for use as a ground cover instead of grasses.

I have allways cut these areas at 2.75". No you don't. Quit lieing. Where are the pics?

Mscotrid
07-17-2003, 12:33 PM
I'm not sure of the rest of you guys, but Clover isn't a friend of mine. Studies have shown the amount of nitrogen received by the soils from clover does not off set the distraction from a well manicured lawn.

Left unchecked clover will spread aggressively into a yard. I'm not sure of the theory of clover grows in low nitrogen areas. Seems to me a weed is a weed and will be transplanted and grow in any turf when left to it's own choice.

I love the smell of Herbicide in the morning....


M

yardmonkey
07-18-2003, 12:23 PM
"Left unchecked clover will spread aggressively into a yard. I'm not sure of the theory of clover grows in low nitrogen areas. Seems to me a weed is a weed and will be transplanted and grow in any turf when left to it's own choice."

Well I may be on the other side of this from most people on this forum, as far as what is a weed and waht to do about them. But a weed is any undesirable plant. So if you don't like clover, its a weed. Bermuda grass is also a weed if it is growing where you don't want it.

As far as growing in any turf when left to their own choice - there are many hundreds or maybe thousands of weed seeds in any square foot of any lawn. These seeds will sprout only when the conditions are right for that weed. You can notice that on 10 lawns in a row, each will have different weeds. They all have the same seeds, which are blowing around in the wind by the billions. But each weed grows where the conditions are right for it. A well-managed lawn (chemicals or not) is not that inviting for most weeds, mainly because the thick, healthy turfgrass should shade them out. And if the soil is in good shape, that is even better. Many weeds can be considered indicator weeds, which can reveal problems with the soil. And many weeds are actually trying to rectify those problems. In many yards, clover may sprread aggressively, and in many others, it will not be able to.

Chemicals can seem to be the logical, practical and economical way to fight weeds, but long-term use of some of the chemicals can make the soil sick enough that it will be covered with weeds as soon as the chemicals stop. This has to do with hurting the life in the soil, the many types of micro-organisms that are part of healthy living soil. And then there's the earthworms....

dan deutekom
07-18-2003, 08:53 PM
Oh No

Here we go again

pesticides or not pesticides

organic or synthetic

Nice grass or weedy looking clover

:dizzy: :dizzy: :dizzy: :dizzy:

Nobody on middle ground?:help:

MOW ED
07-20-2003, 09:13 AM
Its only a weed if you perceive it to be a weed.

Years ago they seeded many lawns here with a combination of grass and clover. Some people like the look. I have a customer that doesn't want anything on her lawn. From a distance it is green. Up close it is a dizzying array of every type of weed and clover you can find with some fairy ring mixed in. Her daughter talked her into a natural lawn because all the birds will go away if she applies chemicals. Well the birds are still there, the grass has gone away.

On a different note, I have a friend who seeded his lawn and added oats to the mix. It was funny because we told him to just graze goats to cut the lawn. After 3 years the lawn looked ok. He is just a homeowner who heard that this was the thing to do. Any other weird grass mixes out there?

hustlers
07-20-2003, 12:03 PM
the future of turfgrass will need to rely on Nitrogen fixing
leguminous ground covers which are attractive and reduce the
need of fertilizing bu using FREEEE atmospheric Nitrogen.

It would greatly reduce the pollution caused be making N

I have worked on coffee plantations and used ground peanut
as a very effective thick ground cover which fixes N for the plant and no additional applications of Fertilizer are ever applied,
the plants are very healthy and in the sun demand much add. N
of which I have never applied to.

QUALITY GOES UP_ quantity goes down__ I hate cheap coffee

bobbygedd
07-20-2003, 04:20 PM
confront granular works great on clover

Grassmechanic
07-20-2003, 10:58 PM
Originally posted by hustlers
the future of turfgrass will need to rely on Nitrogen fixing
leguminous ground covers which are attractive and reduce the
need of fertilizing bu using FREEEE atmospheric Nitrogen.

It would greatly reduce the pollution caused be making N

I have worked on coffee plantations and used ground peanut
as a very effective thick ground cover which fixes N for the plant and no additional applications of Fertilizer are ever applied,
the plants are very healthy and in the sun demand much add. N
of which I have never applied to.

QUALITY GOES UP_ quantity goes down__ I hate cheap coffee
What did you do? plant the peanuts around the coffee? If not, there will be no fixating of nitrogen from ground-up peanut products applied as a mulch. The nitrogen fixating nodules are located in the root systems of legumes. HTH.

Mike

chefdrp
07-24-2003, 01:24 AM
i used ortho weed b gone. sure enough tey were gone in 2 days