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hywkbdr346
10-05-2003, 06:48 PM
ok,

I am looking to start a lawn cutting service next summer, and i'm looking for some starters advice.

I want to get into cutting yards in subdivisions, mid sized yards. Here are some of my main questions:

In general, what is a versatile size and style mower for this application?

Is 6000 dollars enough to get started?

In general, do people pay per cut or monthly?

On average how much ground, in terms of average sized yards, can two people cover in a 10-11 hour day?

what are some of the negatives to a lawn cutting service?

Any other advice, tips, pitfalls will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks-
Tony Roggenbuck

MT Lawn Care
10-05-2003, 07:13 PM
just starting out 6,000 is ok to start.

(equiptment) 36" walk behind if money allows you want a hydro.

( billing ) some of my customers ( not many ) pay per cut most pay on an average, 42 cuts per year billed over 12 months.

(how many )i'm solo i cut 7 or 8 per day 10 or 11 on long daylight days and thats movin pretty quick.

( negatives ) collecting money.

p.s. do your homework on anything you want to buy.
and remember it is your company and your name thats out there.

good luck!!!

tiedeman
10-07-2003, 03:04 PM
welcome to the site

What I have always told people, and I still do it, research. Even today when I get lawn & landscape magazines in mail I grab a pen and paper and take notes over the whole magazine. I also do research all the time on the web in relation to business articles and information not relating to the lawn care industry.

You can never learn too much

Rustic Goat
10-08-2003, 03:28 AM
So you want to be in the Lawn Care biz.

I too would suggest a 36" walk behind with a mulching kit and a sulky, hydro would be nice but budget all equipment before buying any. Total outlay may effect some purchases.

Read the thread by Eric Elm on start up advice.

Suggest mulching only, much quicker, environmentally friendly.

Start customer shopping now, plan on ad campaign starting maybe Feb.

When bidding lawns, be sure to take note of all physical factors, size, smooth or hilly, trees, shrubs, flower beds, how much and what kind of trimming, gate sizes, swimming pools, pets, etc. Anything that will effect the time it will take to complete the lawn.

Keep meticulous paper records of all purchases and income. If you don't know a CPA, find one, he/she may well be your new best friend, at least on the financial front.

When shopping equipment, also shop the equipment dealer, their attitude and service department. Don't buy the first thing you see, shop around, pick up mfg brochures, go to mfg web sites, take notes and compare. The equipment you get will either make your labor as easy as possible or you can end up fighting to get jobs done and cut your production and attitude way down.
Read every thread you can stand on this site, lots of good info here.
Best wishes