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lostkraft
11-11-2003, 03:40 PM
Hi everyone. I was just wondering if someone could point me in the right direction. I am trying to find a website to purchase pesticide free fert, weed controls, etc... Organic materials.. And hopefully - maybe perhaps some one has puchased from before, or know that the products are good. I imagine the more you buy, the cheaper the product?? So possibly a wholesale supplier? Anything would be appreciated greatly..Thanks!

gwwilson
11-11-2003, 04:47 PM
purchase it right in local farm store mill.
corn meal works excellent cost about $207 / ton
vs. corn gluten meal for about $20 / 50# bag


Corn Gluten Meal for Crabgrass Control
The idea of using corn gluten meal for weed control burst on the scene in the early 1990's after Dr. Nick Christians
at Iowa State accidentally discovered its herbicidal properties while he was testing it for suppression of turf
diseases. After several years of efficacy studies and product development, corn gluten meal has gained national
attention as being the first effective "organic" herbicide. Corn gluten meal is not a registered pesticide because the
U.S. EPA has granted an exemption for corn gluten meal as an herbicide.
Corn gluten meal is a product of the wet milling process. It is a pre-emergent herbicide which inhibits root
formation during germination. It is currently labeled for control of crabgrass, barnyardgrass, foxtails (Setaria spp.),
dandelion, lambsquarters, pigweed, purslane and smartweed. Data suggest it has at least some activity on an even
wider variety of plants. It is safe to use on established turf. Do not use corn gluten meal in an area in which you are
trying to establish turfgrass.
Research shows 50-60 percent control can be achieved in the first year when applied at 20 lbs. Per 1000 ft. Studies
suggest that control is improved in successive years and as use rates increase. Currently it is sold as a dry product
under various trade names, including Dynaweed, Safe 'N Simple, Earth Friendly, W.O.W.!, Corn Gluten Meal
Herbicide and Propac. It is sold for the homeowner market in retail stores as Concern-Weed Prevention Plus. Until
recently it was only offered in powder form. Now a granular form is available which can be more easily applied
with Vikon spreaders, rotary and drop spreaders. Application rates vary from 12 to 20 lbs. per 1000 feet, once in
early to mid-spring and another in early to mid-August. Since the corn gluten meal is about 10 percent nitrogen,
this catches two flushes of crabgrass and spreads out the nitrogen effect. Two applications at 12 lbs/1000 ft. Will
provide nearly 2.5 lb. N/1000 ft per year. The nitrogen is in a slow release form so there is little to no potential for
foliar burn. Bulk orders cost about $950/ton; 50 lb. Bags run between $25 and $30. This is the same corn gluten
meal sold at feed mills for animal feed; however, it is pelletized for easier and more uniform application.
Portions of at least two proteins in the corn gluten meal, called peptides, are the active ingredients in corn gluten
meal. Laboratory studies show the peptides themselves to be significantly more effective at preventing weed
germination than the corn gluten meal itself. Unfortunately the peptides do not persist in the soil when used as a
spray long enough for effective control. Current research is aimed at isolating and packaging these peptides to
produce a sprayable product.

Randy J
11-11-2003, 08:06 PM
Not sure if this is exactly what you're looking for, but North Country Organics (http://www.norganics.com/index.html) isn't too far from you.

Randy

Dchall_San_Antonio
11-12-2003, 02:49 PM
Check out the FAQ on this forum and see if you have any more questions.

sgphillips
03-09-2013, 02:42 PM
Where can corn meal be bought near Center Valley PA for about $207 / ton or $20 / 50 lbs bag?

purchase it right in local farm store mill.
corn meal works excellent cost about $207 / ton
vs. corn gluten meal for about $20 / 50# bag


Corn Gluten Meal for Crabgrass Control
The idea of using corn gluten meal for weed control burst on the scene in the early 1990's after Dr. Nick Christians
at Iowa State accidentally discovered its herbicidal properties while he was testing it for suppression of turf
diseases. After several years of efficacy studies and product development, corn gluten meal has gained national
attention as being the first effective "organic" herbicide. Corn gluten meal is not a registered pesticide because the
U.S. EPA has granted an exemption for corn gluten meal as an herbicide.
Corn gluten meal is a product of the wet milling process. It is a pre-emergent herbicide which inhibits root
formation during germination. It is currently labeled for control of crabgrass, barnyardgrass, foxtails (Setaria spp.),
dandelion, lambsquarters, pigweed, purslane and smartweed. Data suggest it has at least some activity on an even
wider variety of plants. It is safe to use on established turf. Do not use corn gluten meal in an area in which you are
trying to establish turfgrass.
Research shows 50-60 percent control can be achieved in the first year when applied at 20 lbs. Per 1000 ft. Studies
suggest that control is improved in successive years and as use rates increase. Currently it is sold as a dry product
under various trade names, including Dynaweed, Safe 'N Simple, Earth Friendly, W.O.W.!, Corn Gluten Meal
Herbicide and Propac. It is sold for the homeowner market in retail stores as Concern-Weed Prevention Plus. Until
recently it was only offered in powder form. Now a granular form is available which can be more easily applied
with Vikon spreaders, rotary and drop spreaders. Application rates vary from 12 to 20 lbs. per 1000 feet, once in
early to mid-spring and another in early to mid-August. Since the corn gluten meal is about 10 percent nitrogen,
this catches two flushes of crabgrass and spreads out the nitrogen effect. Two applications at 12 lbs/1000 ft. Will
provide nearly 2.5 lb. N/1000 ft per year. The nitrogen is in a slow release form so there is little to no potential for
foliar burn. Bulk orders cost about $950/ton; 50 lb. Bags run between $25 and $30. This is the same corn gluten
meal sold at feed mills for animal feed; however, it is pelletized for easier and more uniform application.
Portions of at least two proteins in the corn gluten meal, called peptides, are the active ingredients in corn gluten
meal. Laboratory studies show the peptides themselves to be significantly more effective at preventing weed
germination than the corn gluten meal itself. Unfortunately the peptides do not persist in the soil when used as a
spray long enough for effective control. Current research is aimed at isolating and packaging these peptides to
produce a sprayable product.

Smallaxe
03-10-2013, 09:27 AM
It would be best to experiment with it before investing heavily into it... CGM is as good as any fertilizer, so that part of your claim as an LCO should be safe... but as a pre-m it is a waste... so you really notice a difference if only 100 CG plants invaded your yard, instead of 200???
Will your clients believe that their CG problem may have been 40-50% worse and you promise to do better next year???
I don't have any lawns that require pre-m, because they have been managed to the point of maturity in which CG doesn't find habitat for germination... that is your true organic way... natural,,, not artificially dependant...

phasthound
03-10-2013, 04:07 PM
Those prices are ten years old. It's much higher now.

sgphillips
03-11-2013, 08:47 AM
Any idea what the price are today or if there is any place near Center Valley PA that sale it?

Smallaxe
03-11-2013, 10:49 AM
To get 1 pound of N/k from Milorganite I pay about $2.66 ...

Go to your local agricultural co-op(should be one in a county near you) and see how much a 50 pound bag costs, then compare cost of pounds of N...

phasthound
03-11-2013, 11:20 AM
It's about $33.00/50 lb bag when sold by the pallet.

When used as a pre-emergent it should be applied at 20lbs./k.
Comparing the amount of N with Milroganite is apples to oranges as Milorganiite has no herbicidal properties.

That being said, do not compare the effectiveness of corn meal with chemical herbicides. A successful organic lawn care program involves more than just switching products.

Exact Rototilling
03-11-2013, 11:20 AM
Subscribed
Posted via Mobile Device

Smallaxe
03-11-2013, 12:02 PM
Again,,, I would definately not make any claims about the herbicidal qualities of CGM until I've seen it work in the environments I'm expecting it to work in...
As a Lawncare Professional that puts his/her reputation on the line on a daily basis,,, I don't like the idea of 50-60% success against CG, anymore than I accept a 50-60% plant survival success rate in creating beds and orchards...

The N rate for each dollar is a valid consideration in balancing your business decisions on what you're willing to invest in... some investments payoff and others create bad money issues along with a bad rep... best advice is to invest cautiously... :)

NattyLawn
03-11-2013, 01:06 PM
Any idea what the price are today or if there is any place near Center Valley PA that sale it?

Like Smallaxe said, call your local co-op to get a price. Another thing to remember is the CGM needs to be at least 60% protein to get the herbicidal properties from the material.

lawncuttinfoo
03-12-2013, 01:21 AM
It's about $33.00/50 lb bag when sold by the pallet.

When used as a pre-emergent it should be applied at 20lbs./k.
Comparing the amount of N with Milroganite is apples to oranges as Milorganiite has no herbicidal properties.

That being said, do not compare the effectiveness of corn meal with chemical herbicides. A successful organic lawn care program involves more than just switching products.

It is still available in MN for $20 per 50# bag.

Skipster
03-12-2013, 07:08 AM
It's about $33.00/50 lb bag when sold by the pallet.

When used as a pre-emergent it should be applied at 20lbs./k.
Comparing the amount of N with Milroganite is apples to oranges as Milorganiite has no herbicidal properties.

That being said, do not compare the effectiveness of corn meal with chemical herbicides. A successful organic lawn care program involves more than just switching products.

When using CGM at rates high enough to suppress crabgrass populations, you are applying about 6# N/M. How does that compare to N needs and recommendations for cool season turf? Can you say 'over-fertilization'?

Milorganite (and other biosolids) contain high amounts of heavy metals that can be toxic to pets, fish, and people. I've seen so many dogs get sick, visit the vet, and die from eating Milorganite applications that I won't use it anymore. Most biosolids also contain phosphorus, which you can't apply in many states.

Exact Rototilling
03-12-2013, 08:52 AM
I'm just not very impressed with Milorganite as a fert. It's spendy and I have had much better long lasting performance with organic based bridge products in clients lawns and my own lawn which is a testing area for products I use.

Treated sewage sludge I can buy here 2 different types for top dressing is EPA certified safe but I can not in good conscience use it in my garden for vegetables etc. Sorry organic at heart and I don't trust it.
Posted via Mobile Device

Smallaxe
03-12-2013, 11:11 AM
Milorganite was just an example for a cost per pound of N comparison with CGM becuz an LCO needs to have results for the least amount of cash... Since results with the "Herbicidal Qualities" are not at professional standards(50-60% less CG), it is important to at least have N along with OM to justify the expense...

Milorganite is not full of heavy metals but has added iron that is cheaper per pound than the Ironite name brand...

Organic ferts containing P are exempt from the P ban in our state, which focusses on surface waters...

Kiril
03-12-2013, 11:52 AM
When using CGM at rates high enough to suppress crabgrass populations, you are applying about 6# N/M. How does that compare to N needs and recommendations for cool season turf? Can you say 'over-fertilization'?

And we have yet another set of made up skip numbers. The recommended rate is 20 lbs/1000 when used as a preemergent. CGM is typically 9-10% N, which leaves us with N application rate of 1.8 - 2.0 lbs/1000, which is easily within any cool or warm season turf needs.

Milorganite (and other biosolids) contain high amounts of heavy metals that can be toxic to pets, fish, and people. I've seen so many dogs get sick, visit the vet, and die from eating Milorganite applications that I won't use it anymore. Most biosolids also contain phosphorus, which you can't apply in many states.

Care to provide a comprehensive list of toxic heavy metals that can be found in Milorganite along with the LD-50 for each? You can start with the MSDS, which by law must include information on these toxic metals.

http://www.milorganite.com/en/Retailers/Product-Information/~/media/Files/MSDS/Milorganite%20MSDS%20Pro%206-2-0.pdf

dKoester
03-12-2013, 12:18 PM
Forget that, too many people don't tell the truth these days to take anyones word. Have it tested yourself. And beyond that what was the process of eliminating the heavy metals in biosolids to begin with. Then where was that disposed at?

dKoester
03-12-2013, 12:26 PM
I love the california part.

phasthound
03-12-2013, 03:09 PM
When using CGM at rates high enough to suppress crabgrass populations, you are applying about 6# N/M. How does that compare to N needs and recommendations for cool season turf? Can you say 'over-fertilization'?

Milorganite (and other biosolids) contain high amounts of heavy metals that can be toxic to pets, fish, and people. I've seen so many dogs get sick, visit the vet, and die from eating Milorganite applications that I won't use it anymore. Most biosolids also contain phosphorus, which you can't apply in many states.

You just keep spreading misinformation which is a different form of crap. :nono:

lawncuttinfoo
03-12-2013, 10:45 PM
The recommended rate is 20 lbs/1000 when used as a preemergent.

I always laugh when I hear this. When you correctly analyze the actual ISU data this is not the ideal rate.

A long time ago my wife complied all ISU's data for a college paper (not easy I might add, it's not centralized or even organized) and correctly plotted it. We used this info to determine our rates which work unbelievably great.
The best part was when she called and spoke with Nick who said, "wow that is really nice we should do that"


No I'm not saying Skip is right or even defending him, just a tangent.

Skipster
03-12-2013, 11:07 PM
And we have yet another set of made up skip numbers. The recommended rate is 20 lbs/1000 when used as a preemergent. CGM is typically 9-10% N, which leaves us with N application rate of 1.8 - 2.0 lbs/1000, which is easily within any cool or warm season turf needs.


You obviously haven't read the research. Iowa State's research shows that 20# CGM/M to be no different from their untreated control plots in regards to crabgrass control. ISU's work has consistently shown that 60-80# CGM/M is needed to acheive 50% crbagrass control. At 10%N, you're looking at 6-8#N/M just to get 50% crabgrass control.

Read the research before you post.

Smallaxe
03-13-2013, 09:33 AM
You obviously haven't read the research. Iowa State's research shows that 20# CGM/M to be no different from their untreated control plots in regards to crabgrass control. ISU's work has consistently shown that 60-80# CGM/M is needed to acheive 50% crbagrass control. At 10%N, you're looking at 6-8#N/M just to get 50% crabgrass control.

Read the research before you post.

I try to stay away from these bickerings, but I had to insert a comment about ISU continuing to research with CGM when 60 pounds per k STILL only gives 50% control...
I never saw a gov't funded lost cause... as long as gov't money keeps being thrown at it, it's not lost ,,, it will live...

The CGM has never been anything other than propaganda and any lawn that requires Pre-M of any kind,,, after 3-5 years needs new management...
Aeration should no longer be required after 3-5 years of good management therefore there are no new seeds coming to the surface, and any seeds that will germinate in that soil layer has already germinated by then...

My comic relief is over now,,,so continue your bashing one another and I'll ignore the rest of this thread as usual... :)

Kiril
03-13-2013, 12:21 PM
I always laugh when I hear this. When you correctly analyze the actual ISU data this is not the ideal rate.

The recommended rate is directly out of the papers published by Nick Christians.

Example: http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/how-to-use-corn-gluten-meal.pdf

Rates will vary depending on crop and target weed. I generally recommend 20
lbs product per 1000 ft2. This provides about 2 lbs of nitrogen per 1000 ft2. Some
crops that are grown in rows can be treated in bands in the row and weeds can
be tilled between rows. This makes it more economical to use in crop production.
Test the material at rates from 10lbs/1000 ft2 in 10 pound increments to as high
as 80 lbs/1000 ft2.

A long time ago my wife complied all ISU's data for a college paper (not easy I might add, it's not centralized or even organized) and correctly plotted it. We used this info to determine our rates which work unbelievably great.

He quite clearly states rates may vary, however the recommended rate is still 20 lbs/1000. Problem is, most people that use it don't understand how to use it effectively.

Kiril
03-13-2013, 12:41 PM
You obviously haven't read the research.

Clearly you are speaking about yourself again.

Iowa State's research shows that 20# CGM/M to be no different from their untreated control plots in regards to crabgrass control. ISU's work has consistently shown that 60-80# CGM/M is needed to acheive 50% crbagrass control. At 10%N, you're looking at 6-8#N/M just to get 50% crabgrass control.

http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/cornglut3.pdf

At 20.28 lbs/1000 (99 g/m^2) level of control was 58% in 1991.

Further from the same paper:

Although nearly complete control of crabgrass in Kentucky bluegrass turf is
possible with corn gluten meal, the application levels required are excessive. A level of
99 g m -2 (2 Ibs. N 1000 ft-2), which can provide 58% reduction in crabgrass
establishment, would be practical in the spring application and is the suggested
application level for crabgrass control with this material.


Read the research before you post.

Indeed you should.

dKoester
03-13-2013, 07:50 PM
This should go down in the hall of shame.

lawncuttinfoo
03-13-2013, 11:21 PM
Kiril, the first link you posted is not a peer reviewed research paper. It is an opinion on the results of that research. Additionally it was written someone selling an idea to companies who want an easy application rate, this can not be discounted.

The second link you posted is actual research, however it is old and does not plot EVERY study and compare it all.

Yes humanity would not get anywhere without standing on the shoulders of their forefathers, however it is sometimes necessary to doubt and reanalyze their findings ourselves. In this case with different and better results.
Translation, don't be lazy, plot it all out yourself and you will see what I mean. :)

Kiril
03-14-2013, 11:07 AM
Kiril, the first link you posted is not a peer reviewed research paper. It is an opinion on the results of that research. Additionally it was written someone selling an idea to companies who want an easy application rate, this can not be discounted.

It is the opinion of the man credited for the discovery. If you have problem with his recommendation, then take it up with him. BTW, that 20 lb recommendation is seen in numerous publications by Christians.

The second link you posted is actual research, however it is old and does not plot EVERY study and compare it all.

How many studies are there with respect to crabgrass control? Further, what relevance does one studies numbers have with another studies numbers? I'll help you with that ..... NONE. You can't just collect numbers from various studies and plot them against each other.

Yes humanity would not get anywhere without standing on the shoulders of their forefathers, however it is sometimes necessary to doubt and reanalyze their findings ourselves. In this case with different and better results.
Translation, don't be lazy, plot it all out yourself and you will see what I mean. :)

What exactly are you getting at? I don't need to plot something to understand what the numbers are telling me. Beyond that, on several occasions I have posted an extensive list of links to papers and articles on the subject of CGM. I'll post them again in the event you missed them.


Studies/Articles On Corn Gluten As A Pre-emergent


PATENT: Updated patent (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/290757.pdf)

ISU: Greenhouse Screening of Corn Gluten Meal as a Natural Control Product for Broadleaf and Grass Weeds (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/grnhsechr.pdf)

ISU: Isolation and Identification of Root-Inhibiting Compounds from Corn. Gluten Hydrolysate (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/isolation.pdf)

ISU: Making its way to the marketplace: A natural product for the control of annual weeds (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/cornglut2.pdf)

ISU: Bioactivity of a Pentapeptide Isolated from Corn Gluten Hydrolysate on Lolium perenne L. (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/bioactiv.pdf)

ISU: Herbicidal Activity of Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten Meal on Three Grass Species under Controlled Environments (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/herbicidal.pdf)

ISU: The Use Of A Natural Product For The Control Of Annual Weeds In Turf (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/cornglut.pdf)

ISU: A natural product for the control of annual weeds (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/cornglut2.pdf) (Note: more or less same as previous link)

ISU: The Use of Corn Gluten Meal As A Natural Preemergence Weed Control in Turf (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/cornglut3.pdf)

ISU: How To Use Corn Gluten Meal (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/how-to-use-corn-gluten-meal.pdf)

ISU: Cellular effects in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) associated. with the root inhibiting compound alaninyl-alanine (http://www.hort.iastate.edu/gluten/pdf/Unruh_thesis.pdf)

UCD: Evaluation and Demonstration of Corn Gluten Meal as an Organic Herbicide (http://slosson.ucdavis.edu/newsletters/Wilen_200029044.pdf)

UWEX: Corn Gluten Meal: A Natural Pre-Emergence Herbicide (http://www.extension.umn.edu/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h531cornglutenmeal.html)


Studies/Articles On Natural Products & Methods For Weed Control


UWEX: Corn Gluten Meal and Other Natural Products for Weed Control in Turfgrass (http://www.soils.wisc.edu/extension/FAPM/proceedings/4C.stier.pdf)

UFL: Preliminary Evaluation Of Nonsynthetic Herbicides For Weed Management In Organic Orange Production (http://www.hos.ufl.edu/cachweb/FSHS_2004.pdf)

JA-CSSPA: Weed Suppression by Deleterious Rhizobacteria is Affected by Formulation and Soil Properties (http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/36221500/cswq-0214-147110.pdf)

JA-CS: Cultural Management of Weeds in Turfgrass: A Review (http://crop.scijournals.org/cgi/reprint/43/6/1899.pdf)

PATENT: Xanthomonas campestris isolates and methods of use (http://www.freepatentsonline.com/5271932.html)

goodgreen
04-16-2013, 10:27 AM
Find an Amsoil dealer near you and ask them for Aggrand Organic Lawn and Garden fertilizer. It's mixed in a sprayer backpack and does a wonderful job.

HayBay
04-16-2013, 11:24 AM
I have used Corn Gluten for more than 8 years now.
Its more of an expensive fertilizer at $32 per 50lb bag. Registered as a pesticide.

We use it for a fertilizer or weed suppression on very small properties. You want to basically cover the whole ground with the granules. CGM dries out weed and grass seed when in contact with them.

The biggest trick is timing the application just right, which will not happen very often.

Its was promoted at 20lbs originally, people complained it didn't work.
The suppliers bumped it upto 40 lbs per 1000 ft.
Then people complained it was too expensive and a forklift was required to move the huge amounts of bags required to apply to lawns. So the supplier went back to suggesting 20lbs per 1000.

Then people complained about the amount of N. So they came out with a useless liquid version without the N.
Short Shelf Life, stinks bad.

CGM is a waste of time and money. It is not sustainable, it doesn't work better over time.

If you have access to EPA approved pesticides, stick with what works. You can at least make a living without going broke.

One of the Moderators here has expressed his views of CGM

•Posted by dchall_san_antonio 8 San Antonio (My Page) on
Wed, Feb 15, 12 at 22:01

I highly recommend you go to the source at Iowa State and read the original research. CGM is not perfect, as was found a long time ago. If I recall correctly, you need to apply 40 pounds per 1,000 during the season or you're wasting your time and money.
Last season I applied 20 pounds per 1,000 every month from March through October. That's 160 pounds per 1,000 over the season. I have as many weeds this spring as ever. There is no way I missed the timing.

My experience is considered an anecdote by the scientific community; however, the collection of anecdotes is what these forums are all about. I like to call it, experiential evidence.



Milogranite used to contain higher levels of metal (lou gehrig disease) I am sure Milogranite is better now.

Kiril
04-16-2013, 11:31 AM
CGM is a waste of time and money. It is not sustainable, it doesn't work better over time.

Agreed, not sustainable, however conventional pesticides are neither sustainable nor do they work better over time.

If you have access to EPA approved pesticides, stick with what works. You can at least make a living without going broke.

Profit at all costs ..... :rolleyes:

One of the Moderators here has expressed his views of CGM

One should not draw conclusions about a product if one does not understand how it works. That applies to you are well HB.

HayBay
04-16-2013, 11:46 AM
kiril if you have the milogranite msds from the 1980s, please post it.

Kiril
04-16-2013, 12:16 PM
kiril if you have the milogranite msds from the 1980s, please post it.

It just so happens I do, but why? Do you have a bag of milorganite from the 80's?

HayBay
04-16-2013, 05:56 PM
Was hoping there was difference of info on what types of heavy metals are/were in Milogranite.

Here is some Corn Gluten Links. Strictly Turf Extension comments.

http://www.puyallup.wsu.edu/~linda%20chalker-scott/horticultural%20myths_files/Myths/Corn%20gluten.pdf

http://organic.kysu.edu/CGM.shtml

phasthound
04-16-2013, 08:40 PM
I'll have to agree that CGM has not performed as well as had been hoped.
Better results for weed reduction are achieved with annual overseeding, hand pulling, proper mowing and irrigation practices.

Some have had better results using liquid corn gluten. It does not depend as heavily on weather conditions, is far less labor intensive. Also, N is much lower so it can be applied selectively to areas that are prone to crabgrass without showing a better green up.

Kiril
04-17-2013, 10:50 AM
Was hoping there was difference of info on what types of heavy metals are/were in Milogranite.

It does not list trace toxic metals and the percentages stated are the same as the current MSDS available from their site (less than 1.0%, most less than 0.1%)

Kiril
04-17-2013, 11:20 AM
Here is some Corn Gluten Links. Strictly Turf Extension comments.

http://www.puyallup.wsu.edu/~linda%20chalker-scott/horticultural%20myths_files/Myths/Corn%20gluten.pdf

http://organic.kysu.edu/CGM.shtml

When someone talks about CGM as a desiccant, they don't know what they are talking about.

Guess I have to spell it out since clearly people can't read the studies, including Chalker.

CGM works as a growth regulator by inhibiting root formation and growth during seed germination. In order for it to be effective, the compounds responsible for this inhibiting effect must be present in the soil when the seed germinates and for maximum effect the seed must be exposed to moisture stress. If you can't ensure these two conditions are met, then don't expect eye popping results ..... expect variable results as numerous field trials have demonstrated.

HayBay
04-17-2013, 06:54 PM
Yes Kiril. Your technically right.

Also regarding Milogranite I do see on one Msds a California Prop 65 warning.