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Nitroman
02-26-2004, 06:31 PM
I'm mainly a lawn care guy but just picked up a descent mulch and flower job. It is over grass and I was planing on renting a bed edger. I was wondering what some of your more cost effective, but efficient ways were of killing the grass but still being able to plant flowers over it were. I'm not a real experienced landscaper as you can tell so any steps would be great.

thanks :confused:

crawdad
02-26-2004, 06:44 PM
Originally posted by 60"dixie
I'm mainly a lawn care guy but just picked up a descent mulch and flower job. It is over grass and I was planing on renting a bed edger. I was wondering what some of your more cost effective, but efficient ways were of killing the grass but still being able to plant flowers over it were. I'm not a real experienced landscaper as you can tell so any steps would be great.

thanks :confused:
I don't know about your state, but most places require you to be certified in order for you to use chemicals such as Roundup, so clear plastic, laid over the grass, cooking it in the sun, would be most cost effective. When all is dead, remove and re-use the plastic.
Crawdad

Lombardi
02-26-2004, 11:37 PM
Rent a sod cutter, roll up sod, spread Preen, plant flowers, spread mulch. Laying plastic is a PITA.

j fisher
02-26-2004, 11:41 PM
Originally posted by Lombardi
Rent a sod cutter, roll up sod, spread Preen, plant flowers, spread mulch. Laying plastic is a PITA.

Thats the way to do it.

Chris Wagner
02-27-2004, 01:19 AM
Of course there is always gasoline or boiling water... but you'll still have to get rid of the turf.

launboy
02-27-2004, 02:57 AM
if the area is not a big one use a flat head shovel (sharpen the tip with your grind wheel) just scrape off the top layer or maybe about 2 inches lower of grass. put some kind of weed killer down (if you can) put down fabric (optional) plant your plants, spread your mulch, admire your work,collect the check. or if the area is big use a sod cutter definitely.... you really need to get down to a bare dirt bed or you will have mucho grass and weeds

Coffeecraver
02-27-2004, 06:38 AM
What is the size of the bed in question?

dougaustreim
02-27-2004, 09:38 AM
Killing the existing grass is really the only option. Unless you can dig out every last root, the grass can come back. Preen is fine for preventing seeds from germinating, but is not effective for grass coming back from roots that are in the bed. Black plastic will prevent the grass from coming through, except up through the holes cut for the plants.

The easiest and least work is roundup sprayed over the bed area.

Doug
Austreim Landscaping

D Felix
02-27-2004, 11:03 AM
If you use the plastic trick, use black plastic. Remove it before you mulch, plastic has no place in the landscape, especially under mulch. Not even rock.

I know you are in Indiana, and you do need to have a commercial pesticide liscense to apply chemicals. Round-up included. Now, if you wanted to paint out the bed, and have the client spray the grass, well, I suppose that's one way around it.:D

If you want to get certified, you probably want categories 3A (ornamentals), and 3B (turf). The turf category is a PITA, from what my boss says. The ornamentals isn't so bad. Find the Office of the Indiana State Chemist through the Purdue website (http://www.purdue.edu). Or call them at 765-494-1585. You will need the core (RT) before you can get a category. I think you may be SOL on the core testing for the spring at this point though.

Lemme know if you need any more info.


Dan

Lux Lawn
02-27-2004, 01:59 PM
Originally posted by Lombardi
Rent a sod cutter, roll up sod, spread Preen, plant flowers, spread mulch. Laying plastic is a PITA.

Thats what I would do but I would add some bed mix to raise the bed a little bit above the height of the grass.

dougaustreim
02-27-2004, 07:11 PM
The point I was trying to make is that the unless you cut the sod really deep, you won't necesaarily get all of the grass roots, and Preen will not prevent grass regrowth from roots, only works on seed. Use the Roundup and then you'll know the grass is dead. Trust me after 32 years of this, I've dealt with the grass coming back too many times, anymore I only have to deal with it in jobs installed by others. Besides that, if you kill the grass, most of the time you don't have to remove all that extra material, usually your beds need to be built up anyway to get the proper drainage, especially along foundations.

Doug
Austreim Landscaping

trying 2b organic
02-29-2004, 01:07 AM
How about putting cardboard on the grass then soil on the cardboard. Soil in a mound so no need for edging a true raised bed. Then plant then mulch. Ive seen this done, wonder if it lasts or if its ok for the plants.

launboy
02-29-2004, 01:15 AM
cardboard??????? when it getswet it will deteriorate real fast a heckof alot faster then fabric or plastic

trying 2b organic
02-29-2004, 01:18 AM
ya thats the idea, but enough soil to prevent any grass from comming up. Will the cardboard and soil kill the grass by the time it disappears?

NickN
02-29-2004, 12:53 PM
Do it right the first time.Either rent a sod cutter and remove the soil or as a cheaper,but less effective method,use a tiller.Till the soil and remove all the grass you can.
What kind of grass do they have,btw?
Now come back in and amend the soil,working it in with the tiller.Set your plants and install mulch and a bed border(if you choose to use a border).
Down here,everyone has Bermuda.Bermuda being Bermuda,it finds every possible way to get into places you don't want it,so everyone uses landscape fabric to minimize this.

Nitroman
03-01-2004, 07:27 PM
Thanks for the tips:blob2:

raystreet
04-18-2004, 02:09 PM
WE DO A LOT OF THIS TYPE OF WORK USE ROUNDUP TO KILL THE GRASS THEN WAIT 3 DAYS TRIM THE DEAD GRASS DOWN TO THE GROUND ADD THE NEW EDGE A MULCH THEN ADD SNAPSHOT

BUTTERFLY LAWN CARE INC
MIDDLETOWN DE

bobbygedd
04-18-2004, 09:49 PM
wow, it's like splitting atoms with you guys.

ElephantNest
04-18-2004, 10:37 PM
Easiest way? Pile the dirt on top of the grass, trench edges, plant, mulch, collect money. Hehe I have the nicest gardens in my neighborhood, I never removed one blade of grass in my front yard. Now, I don't do this on all of my client's gardens, but I sure could on many. One of my front gardens was simply one yard of soil, piled and shaped, dug the trenches, planted and mulched it. Done. A week later I sprayed the edges with Round-Up, for the few blades of grass that actually lived through inches of soil on top of it.

Obviously this would only work on raised beds.

David Shaw
04-19-2004, 03:09 PM
If you use Roundup be sure and dig your bed edge before you spray the Roundup. Otherwise you will end up with dead grass that you don't want dead. This is called translocation. The reason I know? Made the same da** mistake myself.

Mark Lawncare
04-19-2004, 11:19 PM
What if the bed your spraying with roundup has shrubs or small trees already in it with grass all around them. Will the roundup hurt the small tree/shrubs?

D Felix
04-20-2004, 12:29 PM
Only if you get it on the foliage of the trees and shrubs.

Roundup will not move through the soil. When it comes in contact with the soil, it binds so tightly to the soil that it is then essentially inert.

I suppose there is a chance that heavy concentrations could be absorbed through the bark and cause harm to trees/shrubs, however, I suspect it would take a high concentration sprayed over much of the bark area to kill a tree/shrub.

If you are spraying for a client, you need to be licensed in your state to spray commercially. About the only thing you can do here in IN is spread straight fertilizer. Anything with any kind of pesticide in it and you need to be licensed... I suspect most other states are this way, maybe even more strict.......


Dan