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View Full Version : My take on all this $/hour dicussion.


germann
02-27-2004, 10:19 AM
Many people on this site post on how much to charge, what do you make per hour, HOW CAN YOU CHARGE $50 an hour, etc...etc.

It is interesting to see the variety.

Lawn and Landscape reported....

Lawn care companies report charging anywhere from $20 per hour as a low in Florida and southern California to $75 per hour in the Northeast. Fert. and Squirt is usually higher than the mowing rate by $20-$40. However......

Every locality is different....to price, go by several factors

1.) How much does it cost you to mow that lawn? In other words, you need to know how much your equity costs to run per hour, and what your other overhead is divided over your yearly hours. Jim Huston (SP?) has great advice and workbooks on job costing. We picked a workbook of his up after his talk on pricing at the lawn and garden show.

2.) What do the other companies in your area charge? If you can't make a profit at that rate, you probably need to cut costs or find different work. You will probably not succeed charging $10/hour more than everyone else, even if your quality is high.
NOTE-You will be more expensive than scrubs. If someone wonders why, explain to them the importance of a license and insurance.

Lawnsite is a global community. Many of the posts you read will be irrelevant to you and your business. Look at the "posters" location, equipment, profile, and other posts before you buy into their info.

And remember, this is just my opinion........
:)

bobbygedd
02-27-2004, 11:02 AM
you are absolutely correct on all said. mostly, and what others here say is irrelivent, is how much the competition is charging. you must be competative, i don't care what quality of work you provide, what equipment you use, or if you look like brad pitt, if you are not competitive in pricing, you're finished. i tend to be , on average, $7-$10 higher than the true scrubs, and $3-$5 higher than the legit companies, and i'm selling them with relative ease, with some great sales tactics i've developed over the years. the guys that come in too low, either can't do the work properly, or can't afford thier overhead, and they are finished. the guys that come in too high, don't get the work, or they get it, then lose it to another company because of pricing.