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Jackman
03-04-2004, 08:57 AM
I am trying to get into Unilok pavers bought a plate tamper but not sure what to use to cut the bricks, I suppose a Demosaw would work but have also heard of a Geateen (sp) cutter and a diamond blade wet saw. What do you guys use. I appreciate your comments. Thanks Jack

dougaustreim
03-04-2004, 09:12 AM
definately saw, don't split your bricks. The diamond blade is the only way to go. Wet is ok but not essential.

When we first started, we used a DeWalt chop saw with a diamond blade for several years, before we got a better saw.

Doug
Austreim landscaping

ksland
03-04-2004, 01:30 PM
Makita chop with a 8" diamond blade is all I have used for 2 years, same blade too.

GreenMonster
03-04-2004, 01:52 PM
You guys are using electric motor chop saws?

You talking about the kind that will take an abrasive disc for cutting metal?

I've always used a handheld gas with diamond blade. Kind of overkill, and a pain for bricks.

zedosix
03-04-2004, 02:11 PM
Since you are not doing this full time yet, you will be best off with a 14" quick cut, such as a stihl or partner, or echo. There are many types. Put a diamond blade on it and your good for a couple of months with daily use. When you get a bit more serious about stone, you will be wise to purchase a target or other wet saw also with a 14" diamond blade. Forget the chop off saws they are way too slow, and there not really meant for this type of work.

DUSTYCEDAR
03-04-2004, 02:14 PM
u can rent a wet saw when needed
i use a mk wet saw a huskvarna cut off saw with a wet diamond blade and a worm drive saw when needed

NNJLandman
03-04-2004, 02:59 PM
gas powered saw, best what to cut. Its fast and easy. I have used other things to cut pavers and blocks but nothing cuts as smoothly as a saw.

hole in one lco
03-04-2004, 03:05 PM
stihl chop saw don't forget ear plugs and dust mask

hole in one lco
03-04-2004, 03:08 PM
I forgot to tell you always cut your brick on a angel it makes it easier to nibble if you have to.

dougaustreim
03-04-2004, 05:29 PM
It is very difficult to make a neat cut on a small paver with a gas hand held saw, as well as being unsafe. The electric chop saw with a diamond blade installed instead of the crabide will work very well for a starter setup. You can pay for a chop saw with just a few rentals of the wet saw.

Doug
Austreim landscaping

zedosix
03-04-2004, 06:38 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by dougaustreim
[B]It is very difficult to make a neat cut on a small paver with a gas hand held saw, as well as being unsafe.

What could be so "unsafe" as using a hand held quick-cut? Neatness comes with experience.
Most retaining wall blocks these days require a 14" blade and even larger to go thru in one shot.

jwholden
03-04-2004, 06:50 PM
I use a 12" gas cutquick for cutting. The easiest and least time consuming method for me is to use the foot opposite the saw to hold the brick while cutting. Long cuts in a field of bricks are done in place, except for tight curves. I also angle the cut SLIGHTLY toward the portion of the brick I am keeping. Looks great on top but leaves some 'fudge' room below.

ALWAYS WEAR A QUALITY RESIPIRATOR. 10 OR 20 BUCK FOR A RESPIRATOR IS CHEAPER THAN DYING FROM LUNG DISEASE!!!

GreenMonster
03-04-2004, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by jwholden
I use a 12" gas cutquick for cutting. The easiest and least time consuming method for me is to use the foot opposite the saw to hold the brick while cutting. Long cuts in a field of bricks are done in place, except for tight curves. I also angle the cut SLIGHTLY toward the portion of the brick I am keeping. Looks great on top but leaves some 'fudge' room below.

ALWAYS WEAR A QUALITY RESIPIRATOR. 10 OR 20 BUCK FOR A RESPIRATOR IS CHEAPER THAN DYING FROM LUNG DISEASE!!!

I basically use the same technique with a 14" cut off. It's a bit of a hassle starting/stopping a gas powered frequently. I was just wondering might be relatively inexpensive stationary saw options. You can pick up a chop saw somewhat inexpensively, but I would think the dust would do a number on an electric motor.

I've gone with the cut off saw because it is most versatile (wall block too).

Jackman
03-04-2004, 10:10 PM
Thanks guys I never would have thought of the chop saw just seems unatural however since I am just starting in this I ll give it a try with a Craftsman saw or some other low priced unit. If the Unilok works out then Ill spend the big bucks for the wet saw. Thanks again Jack

mdvaden
03-05-2004, 12:44 AM
This year, I decided to offer paver block install too. Made up my mind while talking to vendors at the Portland Yard Garden and Patio Show.

Can't believe I waited this long. The base is much easier to prep that I expected.

I plan to start with fairly simple installs - like no fancy designs.

My impression was that a wet saw was the means to cut correctly and keep dust down.

How many folks use two or three saws?

The installation guide I picked up did not explain how to cut a curve. Anyone want to explain that one?

little green guy
03-05-2004, 12:53 PM
I use a sthil 12" saw for all staight runs and easier cut and a target wet saw for the more smaller more intricut cut. That the way i've found to be the fastest and still be able to do the harder cuts nicely

little green guy
03-05-2004, 12:54 PM
I use a sthil 12" saw for all staight runs and easier cuts and a target wet saw for the more smaller more intricut cuts. Thats the way i've found to be the fastest and still be able to do the harder cuts nicely

dougaustreim
03-05-2004, 01:37 PM
I wonder what the OSHA inspector would say about using your foot to stabilize an 8" long paver while cutting with a gas cut off saw. Larger block is possibly ok, but small pavers. really now


Doug
Austreim Landscaping

Jackman
03-05-2004, 09:15 PM
Little Green Guy when you are cutting the straight runs are the bricks already installed in the walk? I was under the impression that the bricks are cut one at a time and then installed. I am just getting started so there is much to learn. Thanks Jack

jwholden
03-05-2004, 10:26 PM
I wear steel toe boots!!!

hole in one lco
03-05-2004, 11:21 PM
Get your self some paver tubes to makes life a lot easier and get a couple different sizes.

I always put a solder course so each paver hast be cut individually.

Always make your base as if you were going to park a car on it you don't want go back in 3yr and redo it.

kris
03-06-2004, 08:48 AM
Partner 950 cut off saw with 14" diamond tip blades.

Tim Canavan
03-06-2004, 09:44 AM
go rent a wet saw until you get the hang of it.

zukofsu
03-06-2004, 12:46 PM
IMO the best saw to start out with is a stihl ts400 (or similar hadheld). This is a relatively inexpensive hand held gas saw and you can cut just about anything once you are skilled with this tool. If you are going to rent a saw initially (I did), buy your own diamond blade because the rental place will probably charge you for wear on the blade. Also, you can use this blade when you purchase a saw!

A few things to remember:

- A high quality SEGMENTED diamond blade is much better than a cheaper "turbo" non - segmented blade. Average life on a quality diamond blade is about 800 l.f.

- Bring the saw to the paver to be cut, not the paver to the saw as this will save you countless man hours.

- Clean and check air filter regularly as this will greatly prolong the life of the saw. Also, if "wet cutting" make sure you clean the saw as once this slurry dries it is very hard to remove from machine.

- if cutting the pavers in place, overlay your pattern and DO not compact the pavers before cutting and this will save you countless hours as well.

- In regards to a table or "chop saw" I have used an MK electric which was ok, but a gas powered saw (americut or others) is much more practical and with larger pavers or block the tray is longer to accommodate these cuts with a single pass. Also, with the gas saw you don't have to worry about finding a large outlet and blowing Mrs. Smiths fuses!

- Edco makes an attachment for their saws that lets you turn a handheld into a table saw. I have not used this, but for about $400 dollars the design looks cost effective and promising.

- Last, but not least wear a high quality respirator as you only have one set of lungs. It is also worth looking into a dust collection system that will suck all the dust and debris away.

- One last trick if cutting "wet", instead or recirculating the water and slurry, run a valve with a hose to a suitable drainage area so you can will use "fresh" water all the time and eliminate the need for cleaning the paver after a cut.

sorry for the long post, just a few things I have learned in my short 24 years :)



- :blob2:

landscapingpoolguy
03-06-2004, 03:41 PM
best thing to cut any concrete product with is a gas powered 14" brick wet saw...edco and MK make nice saws but they run about 2g's..if you just doing pavers 2"5/8" you can get away with a quality smaller wet saw like a heavy duty tile saw.....In my opinion wet cuts come way cleaner then dry and so much faster...less wear an tear on the blade too.....if ya really wanna go budget you can use a diamond blade on a miter saw but its slow and alot of dust.

Chuck

little green guy
03-06-2004, 07:02 PM
I usaly don't cut all the pavers in place, i've heard of guys doing that and I have done it and it does work but like someone else mentioned we run a soldier couse and it just ends up that we usually cut them seperatly. Also if it's close to a house which it usually is it gets to dusty so we take the pavers and cut them in an area where the dust won't be a problem.

Project Earth, LLC.
03-10-2004, 09:26 PM
When i first started, I used a Stihl TS-400 chop saw.. Last 2 jobs i did last year, i rented a table wet saw (diamond blade)--

HUGE difference!! I cut pavers at least 10 times faster and a perfect cut everytime. And with the chop saw, you and everything within a 15 ft diameter of you is going to be COVERED in dust.

-JC

trailboss
03-11-2004, 10:22 PM
I know it sounds kinda small but we use a skill saw with a diamond blade on it. It works real well for cutting pavers, small wall block, chop block and flagstone.
We go through about one saw every two years but they're not too expensive. We do have to put a new blade on about every job. Its real hard to put a big piece of flag on a wet saw.

kris
03-12-2004, 01:18 AM
Used to be a die hard stihl fan ... until i tried Partner.
Like mentioned earlier if you can overlay your pattern and cut them in place there is no comparing time to using a table saw. I use to overlay the pattern, set up your boarder stones on top and mark your curve ... yes you could mark it without setting them up but I found it nicer to see exactly how it would look. Knock your boarder stones aside and cut away. You still have to remove a few stones on a tight radius.....It is much much faster.

Mirrorimage37
03-12-2004, 09:58 PM
Cutting pavers? Go with a table mounted wet saw. they will cut up to 3 1/2". Best to use are stationary saw with movable incorperated table. Used the chop saw and other methods, but the dust will kill you. Even attatched a fish tank punp with a resevoir to a drop saw. Nothing works like the wet saw. Most places sell them as commercial tile saws. Remeber measure twice cut once

kris
03-12-2004, 10:02 PM
Originally posted by Mirrorimage37
the dust will kill you.

All our cut offs are equiped with a water supply.

jwholden
03-12-2004, 10:37 PM
Kris,

How does cutting the pavers in place with a wet blade work for you?

Does your sand get saturated? Any trouble with the 'paver sludge' not washing off of pavers?

Sounds like a great idea!!!

kris
03-13-2004, 06:25 AM
You have to wash it off fairly soon but it really isn't that much water. Do another task while it drys a bit and finish it off.

yardmonkey
03-17-2004, 10:49 AM
I'm not too experienced at hardscaping, but I used an old Black and Decker 8" handheld circular saw for awhile. I even used it to cut big slabs of flagstone. I recently got a beat up old 10" chopsaw from a pawnshop for $40. 12" would have been better but didn't have time to shop around or want to spend much extra. The 10" will at least cut through the 4" Edgestone bricks that I like for borders. But if you are experimenting with saws or are concerned about trashing an electric motor or just don't want to spend much - check out the pawn shops. And always ask how much they will take - they will sometimes take half of what they have them marked for. I usually like to buy new tools, but in this case I was glad to have the pawn shops around.

On my first Windsor block wall a couple of years ago, I just split them with the hammer and chisel. Appropriate in some cases, not in others. Normally the split ends of Windsor blocks are hidden up against something.

And yeah - always wear earplugs and a respirator. I've been lazy about eye protection, but probably should do that too. (I never use a weedeater without the safety glasses).

Here's a question. I just put in an Edgestone border and I chopped off a couple of straight edges to make a 90 degree corner by a sidewalk. The sawed end of one brick is exposed a couple of inches and looks a bit tacky since it is white where it was sawed, while the bricks are "river red" in color. I wonder if there is some good way to recolor the cut edge?

SCL
03-17-2004, 05:11 PM
MK makes a real nice chop saw, dry, for around $650 with a blade. Real portable, real dusty. Makes things go real quick and the motors sealed.

john_nj
04-05-2004, 01:12 PM
I'm going to install a 45-degree herringbone using 6x9 pavers (and then adding a soldier course). I'd prefer to cut the pavers in place using a gas-powered hand-held wet saw to save time. I'm concerned that it will be difficult to keep the pavers from moving all over while I cut them.
I'd appreciate any advice or experiences on this.
Thanks.

mdscaper
04-05-2004, 07:00 PM
Partner K700., 14" diamond blade. After years of cutting dry with a rental, finally broke down and bought one with one of those wet cut nozzle kits. Man, what a difference. If you set the flow of the garden hose just enough to keep the dust down , it doesn't make much mess at all.
After many walkways I've gotten pretty good at scoring the curve freehand(any mistakes just flip it over and try again). Then cutting on the scored line.
At some point I think every landscaper has cut unsafely(the holding paver with my foot is something I know I've done in a hurry). But don't press your luck. Your eyes, ears, fingers and feet are too important. I don't know how anyone could use a cut-off saw without ear protection. And this is coming from a Motorhead fanatic.

Rex Mann
04-05-2004, 11:40 PM
John,

When doing a 90 or 45 degree herringbone pattern use a wet saw AKA tub saw, AKA paver table saw. The reason is, with these patterns you make one cut and you get two drop pieces. A wet saw makes it much easier to cut the pieces square. If they are square you can use both pieces. Cutting square with a hand-held can be difficult even for experienced users.

Peace,

Rex

our web site (http://rmstonescaping.com)

rluscomb
03-20-2006, 08:49 PM
am doing a paver job at my home (trial before we start offering service:dizzy: ) have some curves, what is the best way to cut curves and rounded edges. thanks for your help:drinkup: